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Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Three-tiered Perspective), 1997 Color pencil on paper, 23 ½ × 18 inches (59.7 × 45.7 cm)© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Three-tiered Perspective), 1997

Color pencil on paper, 23 ½ × 18 inches (59.7 × 45.7 cm)
© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Pink Butterfly M02G), 2002 Oil on linen, 48 × 34 inches (121.9 × 86.4 cm)© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Pink Butterfly M02G), 2002

Oil on linen, 48 × 34 inches (121.9 × 86.4 cm)
© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (White Butterfly), 2002 Oil on canvas, 72 × 24 inches (182.9 × 61 cm)© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (White Butterfly), 2002

Oil on canvas, 72 × 24 inches (182.9 × 61 cm)
© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Black to Brown Butterfly Green M07 #747), 2007 Oil on linen, 62 × 52 inches (157.5 × 132.1 cm)© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Black to Brown Butterfly Green M07 #747), 2007

Oil on linen, 62 × 52 inches (157.5 × 132.1 cm)
© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Carve Room 702 Memories of the Nile 737), 2007 Oil on cardboard on linen mounted on panel, 45 ½ × 33 inches (115.5 × 83.8 cm)© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Carve Room 702 Memories of the Nile 737), 2007

Oil on cardboard on linen mounted on panel, 45 ½ × 33 inches (115.5 × 83.8 cm)
© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Yellow Face 774), 2007–08 Oil on cardboard mounted on linen, 72 ¼ × 54 ¼ inches (183.5 × 137.8 cm)© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Yellow Face 774), 2007–08

Oil on cardboard mounted on linen, 72 ¼ × 54 ¼ inches (183.5 × 137.8 cm)
© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Red Butterfly I Yellow P MARK GROTJAHN 07-08 751), 2007–08 Oil on linen, 72 ½ × 54 ½ inches (184.2 × 138.4 cm)© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Red Butterfly I Yellow P MARK GROTJAHN 07-08 751), 2007–08

Oil on linen, 72 ½ × 54 ½ inches (184.2 × 138.4 cm)
© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Dancing Black Butterflies), 2007 Color pencil on paper, in 9 parts© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Dancing Black Butterflies), 2007

Color pencil on paper, in 9 parts
© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Dancing Black Butterflies), 2007 (part 1) Color pencil on paper, in 9 parts© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Dancing Black Butterflies), 2007 (part 1)

Color pencil on paper, in 9 parts
© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Captain America Drawing in Ten Parts 41.17), 2008–09 Color pencil and oil on paper, in 10 parts, each: 85 ¾ × 47 ¾ inches (217.8 × 121.3 cm)© Mark Grotjahn. Photo: Rob McKeever

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Captain America Drawing in Ten Parts 41.17), 2008–09

Color pencil and oil on paper, in 10 parts, each: 85 ¾ × 47 ¾ inches (217.8 × 121.3 cm)
© Mark Grotjahn. Photo: Rob McKeever

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Captain America Drawing in Ten Parts 41.17), 2008–09 (detail) Color pencil and oil on paper, in 10 parts, each: 85 ¾ × 47 ¾ inches (217.8 × 121.3 cm)© Mark Grotjahn. Photo: Rob McKeever

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Captain America Drawing in Ten Parts 41.17), 2008–09 (detail)

Color pencil and oil on paper, in 10 parts, each: 85 ¾ × 47 ¾ inches (217.8 × 121.3 cm)
© Mark Grotjahn. Photo: Rob McKeever

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Grey Face 778), 2009 Oil on cardboard mounted on linen, 60 × 48 inches (152.4 × 121.9 cm)© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Grey Face 778), 2009

Oil on cardboard mounted on linen, 60 × 48 inches (152.4 × 121.9 cm)
© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Into and Behind the Green Eyes of the Tiger Monkey Face 43.18), 2011 Oil on cardboard mounted on linen, 48 ⅛ × 37 ⅛ inches (122.2 × 94.1 cm)© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Into and Behind the Green Eyes of the Tiger Monkey Face 43.18), 2011

Oil on cardboard mounted on linen, 48 ⅛ × 37 ⅛ inches (122.2 × 94.1 cm)
© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Ten Dollar Foxes, White on Red Mask M14.d), 2012 Painted bronze, 23 ½ × 10 × 17 inches (59.7 × 25.4 × 43.2 cm), unique variant© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Ten Dollar Foxes, White on Red Mask M14.d), 2012

Painted bronze, 23 ½ × 10 × 17 inches (59.7 × 25.4 × 43.2 cm), unique variant
© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Moss on Rock Heavy Texture Mask M16.d), 2012 Painted bronze, 43 ½ × 16 × 5 ¼ inches (110.5 × 40.6 × 13.3 cm)© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Moss on Rock Heavy Texture Mask M16.d), 2012

Painted bronze, 43 ½ × 16 × 5 ¼ inches (110.5 × 40.6 × 13.3 cm)
© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Top Gates Mask M22.h), 2012 Bronze with wax seal, 28 ½ × 17 ⅜ × 18 inches (72.4 × 44.1 × 45.7 cm), unique variant© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Top Gates Mask M22.h), 2012

Bronze with wax seal, 28 ½ × 17 ⅜ × 18 inches (72.4 × 44.1 × 45.7 cm), unique variant
© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (African II, Gated Front and Back Mask M44.e), 2015 Bronze, 51 ¼ × 19 ¼ × 37 ¾ inches (130.2 × 48.9 × 95.9 cm), unique variant© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (African II, Gated Front and Back Mask M44.e), 2015

Bronze, 51 ¼ × 19 ¼ × 37 ¾ inches (130.2 × 48.9 × 95.9 cm), unique variant
© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Pink Cosco VII Mask M40.h), 2016 Painted bronze, 59 ½ × 33 ¼ × 36 ½ inches (151.1 × 84.5 × 92.7 cm)© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Pink Cosco VII Mask M40.h), 2016

Painted bronze, 59 ½ × 33 ¼ × 36 ½ inches (151.1 × 84.5 × 92.7 cm)
© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (New Capri VII 47.07), 2016 Oil on cardboard, 32 × 25 inches (81.3 × 63.5 cm)© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (New Capri VII 47.07), 2016

Oil on cardboard, 32 × 25 inches (81.3 × 63.5 cm)
© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Full Color Butterfly for Hillary 47.22), 2016 Color pencil on paper, 10 ⅛ × 6 ⅛ inches (25.7 × 15.6 cm)© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Full Color Butterfly for Hillary 47.22), 2016

Color pencil on paper, 10 ⅛ × 6 ⅛ inches (25.7 × 15.6 cm)
© Mark Grotjahn

About

Because I have an active and obsessive eye‚ I’m interested in finding as much contentment as I possibly can. In my work I create problems and then solve them in order to feel peace. 
—Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn combines gesture and geometry with abstraction and figuration in visually dynamic paintings, sculptures, and works on paper. Each of his series reflects a range of art-historical influences and unfolds in almost obsessive permutations.

Grotjahn was born in Pasadena, California. He received a BFA from the University of Colorado at Boulder and an MFA from the University of California at Berkeley. While studying in California, he began his first major project, Sign Exchange (1993–98), in which he painted replicas of signs that he saw in stores around Los Angeles, then had the store owners display his hand-painted versions in place of the originals. In 1995 Grotjahn was an artist-in-residence at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in Madison, Maine. He moved to Los Angeles a year later and, with his classmate Brent Petersen, opened the short-lived gallery Room 702.

In 2001 Grotjahn began the Butterfly series. These geometric paintings and drawings explore the constructs of dual and multi-point perspective and take on various forms as Grotjahn alters their composition and color. A selection of multicolored and monochromatic Butterfly works on paper were exhibited in 2005 at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. In 2018 the Los Angeles County Museum of Art presented 50 Kitchens (2013–18), from the same series, a work with more than fifty parts that all evolved from a single composition and incorporate residual traces of earlier drawings. Continuing his investigations of symmetry, perspective, and form, Grotjahn began the Face paintings in 2003. These expressive, anthropomorphic works of cardboard on canvas often feature sections cut away to reveal painted canvas beneath. As the series progresses, the faces become less apparent and more abstract, their curved lines creating void-like apertures.

Alongside his painting practice, Grotjahn has been making masks since 2000, painting cardboard boxes lying around his studio and affixing paper tubes between cut-out “eyes.” The Masks (2000–), although originally approached as a less formal project, came to assert themselves as a new armature for his painting. In 2010 Grotjahn started casting the Masks in bronze. In many of the sculptures, he incorporated and retained remnants of the bronze casting process, such as the sprues and runners, into his final work. As he does with his paintings, Grotjahn often boldly signs the Masks, allowing his signature to come forward as a compositional element. In 2014 the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas presented the first museum exhibition of Grotjahn’s sculpture, including small-scale and larger freestanding works.

In 2016 Grotjahn began the Capri works (2016–), seeking to break away from the Face paintings in favor of a more experimental, spontaneous working process. The first Capri works, New Capri, were modestly scaled paintings created for a private presentation at Casa Malaparte in Capri, Italy. Following this exhibition, Grotjahn created the Capri paintings (2016–), followed by the Free Capri series (2018–), in which he introduced the technique of scraping out areas of thick paint, then placing the resulting “slugs” in rows and grids elsewhere on the canvas.

As the Butterflies, Faces, Masks, and Capri series continue to expand, Grotjahn uses Instagram to further experiment with repetition and juxtaposition, employing the grid format to freely arrange images in different combinations, in a form of visual tic-tac-toe. Throughout his work, by finding variations within his immediately identifiable style, Grotjahn reveals the complexities of authorial gesture.

Mark Grotjahn

Photo: Monica Almeida/The New York Times/Redux

Fairs, Events & Announcements

Mark Grotjahn in his studio, Los Angeles, 2022. Artwork © Mark Grotjahn

In Conversation

Mark Grotjahn
Andrew Fabricant

Monday, October 10, 2022, 6:15pm
Gagosian, Grosvenor Hill, London

Join Gagosian for a conversation between Mark Grotjahn and Andrew Fabricant, the gallery’s chief operating officer, on the occasion of the artist’s exhibition Backcountry at Gagosian, Grosvenor Hill, London. The pair will discuss Grotjahn’s long-standing exploration of the formal and expressive possibilities of paint, his ongoing experimentation with abstract mark making, and events in his professional and personal life that have informed the new works on view.

Register

Mark Grotjahn in his studio, Los Angeles, 2022. Artwork © Mark Grotjahn

Gagosian’s booth at Art Basel 2022. Artwork, left to right: © Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © Succession Picasso 2022; © John Currin; © Jonas Wood; © Mark Tansey; © 2022 Judd Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © Ellsworth Kelly Foundation. Photo: Sebastiano Pellion di Persano

Art Fair

Art Basel 2022

June 16–19, 2022, hall 2, booth B15
Messe Basel
artbasel.com

Gagosian is pleased to participate in Art Basel 2022 with modern and contemporary works by gallery artists, as well as special entries in the Unlimited section of the fair.

Gagosian’s booth in the main section of the fair represents the full breadth and depth of the gallery’s programming through work by many of its represented artists. On view are new works by Mark Grotjahn, Rudolf Stingel, and Jonas Wood; works by newly represented artists including Ashley Bickerton, Rick Lowe, and Jordan Wolfson; and works by Theaster Gates and Brice Marden, both of whom are also exhibiting at other venues in Basel—Gagosian’s gallery at Rheinsprung 1 and Kunstmuseum Basel, respectively—during the fair.

To receive a pdf with detailed information on the works, please contact the gallery at inquire@gagosian.com. To attend the fair, purchase tickets at artbasel.com.

Gagosian’s booth at Art Basel 2022. Artwork, left to right: © Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © Succession Picasso 2022; © John Currin; © Jonas Wood; © Mark Tansey; © 2022 Judd Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © Ellsworth Kelly Foundation. Photo: Sebastiano Pellion di Persano

Gagosian’s booth at Art Basel Hong Kong 2022. Artwork, left to right: © Georg Baselitz; © Louise Bonnet; © Zeng Fanzhi; © 2019 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All rights reserved; © Rudolf Stingel. Photo: Martin Wong

Art Fair

Art Basel Hong Kong 2022

May 27–29, 2022, booth 1C15
Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre
www.artbasel.com

Gagosian is pleased to participate in Art Basel Hong Kong 2022 with an ensemble of contemporary works by international artists. The gallery’s presentation will feature works by artists including Georg BaselitzLouise BonnetEdmund de WaalUrs FischerKatharina GrosseMark GrotjahnJennifer GuidiSimon HantaïHao LiangDamien HirstThomas HouseagoTetsuya IshidaAlex IsraelEwa JuszkiewiczRick LoweTakashi MurakamiAlbert OehlenNam June PaikGiuseppe PenoneRudolf PolanszkySterling RubyEd RuschaJenny SavilleJim ShawRudolf StingelSpencer SweeneyRachel Whiteread, and Zeng Fanzhi.

Gagosian’s booth at Art Basel Hong Kong 2022. Artwork, left to right: © Georg Baselitz; © Louise Bonnet; © Zeng Fanzhi; © 2019 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All rights reserved; © Rudolf Stingel. Photo: Martin Wong

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Museum Exhibitions

Installation view, Mark Grotjahn: 50 Kitchens, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, May 20–August 19, 2018. Artwork © Mark Grotjahn. Photo: Museum Associates/LACMA

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Mark Grotjahn
50 Kitchens

May 20–August 19, 2018
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
www.lacma.org

Conceived as one work, Mark Grotjahn’s 50 Kitchens (2013–18) takes its inspiration from a single Butterfly composition that Grotjahn made to meet the dimensional specifications of a wall in his kitchen. The more than fifty subsequent chromatic drawings explore pairs of radiating colors and together create a prismatic display. Grotjahn began making his Butterfly compositions in 2001. This exhibition was the first presentation of 50 Kitchens at LACMA.

Installation view, Mark Grotjahn: 50 Kitchens, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, May 20–August 19, 2018. Artwork © Mark Grotjahn. Photo: Museum Associates/LACMA

Mary Weatherford, la noche, 2014 © Mary Weatherford. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen Studio

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The Forever Now
Contemporary Painting in an Atemporal World

December 14, 2014–April 5, 2015
Museum of Modern Art, New York
www.moma.org

Forever Now presents the work of seventeen artists whose paintings reflect a singular approach that characterizes our cultural moment at the beginning of the new millennium: they refuse to allow us to define or even meter our time by them. They represent a wide variety of styles and impulses, but all use the painted surface as a platform, map, or metaphoric screen on which genres intermingle, morph, and collide. Work by Joe Bradley, Mark Grotjahn, and Mary Weatherford is included.

Mary Weatherford, la noche, 2014 © Mary Weatherford. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen Studio

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Scribble Scrabble French Mask M31.b), 2013 © Mark Grotjahn

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Mark Grotjahn
Sculpture

May 31–August 17, 2014
Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas
www.nashersculpturecenter.org

This exhibition was the first dedicated museum presentation of Mark Grotjahn’s sculpture, which the artist began producing privately in 2000, alongside his painting practice. It showcased many never-before-seen, three-dimensional works, ranging in size from small, intimate compositions to larger-scale freestanding works. Combining common cardboard boxes and tubes and cutting them to roughly resemble masks or faces, Grotjahn then scraped these assemblages and cast them in bronze, which he either left raw or elaborately painted.

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Scribble Scrabble French Mask M31.b), 2013 © Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Circus No. 2 Face 44.19), 2013 © Mark Grotjahn

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Mark Grotjahn
Circus Circus

May 16–July 27, 2014
Kunstverein Freiburg, Germany
www.kunstvereinfreiburg.de

Circus Circus was Mark Grotjahn’s first solo exhibition in Germany. Both adopting and commenting on a range of art historical influences, from Renaissance-era drawing technique to Abstract Expressionism and Op art, the works on view demonstrated the artist’s ability to combine the opposing modes of abstraction and figuration. The presentation included a new series of large-scale paintings.

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Circus No. 2 Face 44.19), 2013 © Mark Grotjahn

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Press

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