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Tom Sachs

Tom Sachs, Chanel Guillotine (Breakfast Nook), 1998 Wood, steel, leather, nylon, and rubber, 147 × 122 × 125 inches (373.4 × 309.9 × 309.9 cm), Centre Pompidou, Paris© Tom Sachs. Photo: Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac

Tom Sachs, Chanel Guillotine (Breakfast Nook), 1998

Wood, steel, leather, nylon, and rubber, 147 × 122 × 125 inches (373.4 × 309.9 × 309.9 cm), Centre Pompidou, Paris
© Tom Sachs. Photo: Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac

Tom Sachs, Nutsy’s McDonald’s, 2001 Mixed media, 96 × 74 × 72 inches (243.8 × 188 × 182.9 cm), Astrup Fearnley Museet, Oslo© Tom Sachs. Photo: Tom Powel Imaging Inc.

Tom Sachs, Nutsy’s McDonald’s, 2001

Mixed media, 96 × 74 × 72 inches (243.8 × 188 × 182.9 cm), Astrup Fearnley Museet, Oslo
© Tom Sachs. Photo: Tom Powel Imaging Inc.

Tom Sachs, Unité, 2001 Foamcore, thermal adhesive, Uni-ball Micro pen, wood, steel, resin, Bristol board, and Wite-Out, 7 feet 2 inches × 17 feet 3 inches × 3 feet 2 inches (2.2 × 5.3 × 9.7 m), Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York© Tom Sachs. Photo: Tom Powel Imaging Inc.

Tom Sachs, Unité, 2001

Foamcore, thermal adhesive, Uni-ball Micro pen, wood, steel, resin, Bristol board, and Wite-Out, 7 feet 2 inches × 17 feet 3 inches × 3 feet 2 inches (2.2 × 5.3 × 9.7 m), Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York
© Tom Sachs. Photo: Tom Powel Imaging Inc.

Tom Sachs, Challenger (Crawler), 2003 Foamcore, thermal adhesive, wood, and metal, 118 × 103 × 107 ½ inches (299.7 × 261.6 × 273.1 cm)© Tom Sachs. Photo: Tom Powel Imaging Inc.

Tom Sachs, Challenger (Crawler), 2003

Foamcore, thermal adhesive, wood, and metal, 118 × 103 × 107 ½ inches (299.7 × 261.6 × 273.1 cm)
© Tom Sachs. Photo: Tom Powel Imaging Inc.

Tom Sachs, The Island, 2006 Mixed media, 11 feet 3 inches × 11 feet 3 inches × 22 feet (3.4 × 3.4 × 6.7 m), Fondazione Prada, Milan© Tom Sachs

Tom Sachs, The Island, 2006

Mixed media, 11 feet 3 inches × 11 feet 3 inches × 22 feet (3.4 × 3.4 × 6.7 m), Fondazione Prada, Milan
© Tom Sachs

Tom Sachs, Untitled (1989 Chevy Caprice), 2006 Mixed media, 4 feet 8 inches × 17 feet 8 inches × 6 feet 7 inches (1.4 × 5.4 × 2 m)© Tom Sachs. Photo: Attilio Maranzano

Tom Sachs, Untitled (1989 Chevy Caprice), 2006

Mixed media, 4 feet 8 inches × 17 feet 8 inches × 6 feet 7 inches (1.4 × 5.4 × 2 m)
© Tom Sachs. Photo: Attilio Maranzano

Tom Sachs, Balaenoptera Musculus, 2006 Aluminum, fiberglass, foam core, white polyurethane foam, iron, wood, and hot silicone glue, 19 feet 7 inches × 19 feet 7 inches × 59 feet (6 × 6 × 18 m), Fondazione Prada, Milan© Tom Sachs. Photo: Attilio Maranzano

Tom Sachs, Balaenoptera Musculus, 2006

Aluminum, fiberglass, foam core, white polyurethane foam, iron, wood, and hot silicone glue, 19 feet 7 inches × 19 feet 7 inches × 59 feet (6 × 6 × 18 m), Fondazione Prada, Milan
© Tom Sachs. Photo: Attilio Maranzano

Tom Sachs, Landing Excursion Module (LEM), 2007 Steel, plywood, epoxy resin, and mixed media, 23 feet 1 inch × 21 feet 11 inches × 21 feet 11 inches (7 × 6.7 × 6.7 m)© Tom Sachs. Photo: Josh White

Tom Sachs, Landing Excursion Module (LEM), 2007

Steel, plywood, epoxy resin, and mixed media, 23 feet 1 inch × 21 feet 11 inches × 21 feet 11 inches (7 × 6.7 × 6.7 m)
© Tom Sachs. Photo: Josh White

Installation view, Tom Sachs: Bronze Collection, Lever House, New York, May 8–September 6, 2008 Artwork © Tom Sachs. Photo: Genevieve Hanson

Installation view, Tom Sachs: Bronze Collection, Lever House, New York, May 8–September 6, 2008

Artwork © Tom Sachs. Photo: Genevieve Hanson

Tom Sachs, Gold Helmet, 2011 Duct tape, foam core, thermal adhesive, gold leaf, steel, plexiglass, synthetic polymer paint, and plywood, 12 ½ × 13 × 13 ½ inches (31.8 × 33 × 34.3 cm)© Tom Sachs. Photo: Genevieve Hanson

Tom Sachs, Gold Helmet, 2011

Duct tape, foam core, thermal adhesive, gold leaf, steel, plexiglass, synthetic polymer paint, and plywood, 12 ½ × 13 × 13 ½ inches (31.8 × 33 × 34.3 cm)
© Tom Sachs. Photo: Genevieve Hanson

Tom Sachs, Tea House, 2011 ConEd barrier, plywood, extruded polystyrene, corrugated steel, and mixed media, 10 feet 2 ½ inches × 11 feet × 16 feet 10 ¾ inches (3.1 × 3.4 × 5.2 m)© Tom Sachs. Photo: Genevieve Hanson

Tom Sachs, Tea House, 2011

ConEd barrier, plywood, extruded polystyrene, corrugated steel, and mixed media, 10 feet 2 ½ inches × 11 feet × 16 feet 10 ¾ inches (3.1 × 3.4 × 5.2 m)
© Tom Sachs. Photo: Genevieve Hanson

Tom Sachs, Bonsai, 2016 Bronze, 65 × 91 × 57 inches (165.1 × 231.1 × 144.8 cm)© Tom Sachs. Photo: Genevieve Hanson

Tom Sachs, Bonsai, 2016

Bronze, 65 × 91 × 57 inches (165.1 × 231.1 × 144.8 cm)
© Tom Sachs. Photo: Genevieve Hanson

Installation view, Tom Sachs: Tea Ceremony, Noguchi Museum, New York, March 23–July 24, 2016 Artwork © Tom Sachs. Photo: Genevieve Hanson

Installation view, Tom Sachs: Tea Ceremony, Noguchi Museum, New York, March 23–July 24, 2016

Artwork © Tom Sachs. Photo: Genevieve Hanson

Tom Sachs, Scotch Transparent 666, 2018 Pyrography and latex paint on plywood, 48 × 48 × 4 ½ inches (121.9 × 121.9 × 11.4 cm)© Tom Sachs. Photo: Genevieve Hanson

Tom Sachs, Scotch Transparent 666, 2018

Pyrography and latex paint on plywood, 48 × 48 × 4 ½ inches (121.9 × 121.9 × 11.4 cm)
© Tom Sachs. Photo: Genevieve Hanson

About

Tom Sachs was born in New York in 1966. After studying at the Architectural Association in London in 1987, he received a BA from Bennington College, Vermont, in 1989. Collections include the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Centre Pompidou, Paris; and Astrup Fearnley Museet for Moderne Kunst, Oslo. Solo exhibitions include SITE Santa Fe (1999); Nutsy’s, Bohen Foundation, New York (2002, traveled to Deutsche Guggenheim, Berlin, in 2003); Tom Sachs: Survey—America, Modernism, Fashion, Astrup Fearnley Museet for Moderne Kunst, Oslo (2006); Fondazione Prada, Milan (2006); Space Program: Mars, Park Avenue Armory, New York (2012); Space Program: Europa, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco (2016); Boombox Retrospective 1999–2016, Brooklyn Museum, New York (2016); and Tea Ceremony, Noguchi Museum, New York (2016, traveled to Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas, in 2017).

Sachs lives and works in New York.

Fairs, Events & Announcements

Tom Sachs, Paradox Bullets, 2018 (still) © Tom Sachs

Screening and Talk

Tom Sachs
Paradox Bullets

Friday, February 15, 2019, 6:30–8pm
Paramount Theatre, Los Angeles
frieze.com

As part of the curated film program for Frieze Los Angeles, Tom Sachs’s Paradox Bullets (2018), directed by Van Neistat and narrated by Werner Herzog, will be screened in the historic Paramount Theatre. The short film follows a man, played by Ed Ruscha, who loses his keys in the Mojave Desert and has to use nine bullets, or rules, to get home. The screening will be followed by a conversation between Sachs, Herzog, and Neistat, moderated by Frieze editorial director, Jennifer Higgie. The event is free with fair admission.

Tom Sachs, Paradox Bullets, 2018 (still) © Tom Sachs

Tom Sachs. Photo: Mario Sorrenti

In Conversation

Making the Moonshot
Tom Sachs and Adam Savage with Joseph Becker

Saturday, January 19, 2019, 3pm
Fort Mason Festival Pavilion, San Francisco
fogfair.com

As part of FOG Design+Art programming, Tom Sachs and Adam Savage will discuss their artistic practices with San Francisco Museum of Modern Art curator Joseph Becker. Becker is curating the museum’s upcoming exhibition Far Out: Suits, Habs, and Labs for Outer Space, which both Sachs and Savage will have work in. To attend the event, purchase tickets at fogfair.com.

Tom Sachs. Photo: Mario Sorrenti

Tom Sachs, Paradox Bullets, 2018 (film still) © 2018 Tom Sachs

Screening

Tom Sachs
Paradox Bullets

Sunday, October 7, 2018, 1:30pm
London
www.nikecraft.com

Tom Sachs’s Paradox Bullets, directed by Van Neistat, staring Ed Ruscha and Tom Sachs, and narrated by Werner Herzog, will premiere in London at a secret location, yet to be announced. To attend the event, register for the wait list at www.nike.com.

Tom Sachs, Paradox Bullets, 2018 (film still) © 2018 Tom Sachs

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Museum Exhibitions

Tom Sachs, Kabuto, 2015 © Tom Sachs. Photo: Genevieve Hanson

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Tom Sachs
Tea Ceremony

April 20–June 23, 2019
Tokyo Opera City Art Gallery
www.operacity.jp

This exhibition presents Tom Sachs’s distinctive reworking of the chanoyu, or traditional Japanese tea ceremony—including the myriad elements essential to that intensely ritualistic universe. This exhibition originated at the Noguchi Museum in New York.

Tom Sachs, Kabuto, 2015 © Tom Sachs. Photo: Genevieve Hanson

Man Ray, Le Monde, 1931 © Man Ray Trust/ADAGP, Paris, 2018/VISDA

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The Moon
From Inner Worlds to Outer Space

September 13, 2018–January 20, 2019
Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebæk, Denmark
en.louisiana.dk

This large-scale exhibition highlights the role, the importance, and the fascinating power of the moon. The exhibition presents more than two hundred works and objects from the fields of visual art, film, music, literature, architecture, cultural history, design, and natural science. Work by Yves Klein, Man Ray, and Tom Sachs is included.

Man Ray, Le Monde, 1931 © Man Ray Trust/ADAGP, Paris, 2018/VISDA

Andreas Gursky, Chicago Mercantile Exchange, 1997 © Andreas Gursky/2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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Future Shock

October 7, 2017–June 10, 2018
Site Santa Fe
sitesantafe.org

Future Shock is a large-scale exhibition of works that articulate the profound impact of the acceleration of technological, social, and structural change upon contemporary life. The exhibition brings together ten artists whose works imagine a range of visions of our present and future. Work by Andreas Gursky and Tom Sachs is included.

Andreas Gursky, Chicago Mercantile Exchange, 1997 © Andreas Gursky/2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Installation view, Tom Sachs: Tea Ceremony, Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas, September 16, 2017–January 7, 2018. Photo by Kevin Todora

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Tom Sachs
Tea Ceremony

September 16, 2017–January 7, 2018
Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas
www.nashersculpturecenter.org

Tom Sachs: Tea Ceremony presents Sachs’s distinctive reworking of the chanoyu, or traditional Japanese tea ceremony—including the myriad elements essential to that intensely ritualistic universe. During the course of the exhibition, the Nasher presented a series of public demonstrations in which Sachs or a colleague performed the tea ceremony for a few guests. The walls of the teahouse were removed for the occasion, enabling visitors to watch the ceremony as it unfolds.

Installation view, Tom Sachs: Tea Ceremony, Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas, September 16, 2017–January 7, 2018. Photo by Kevin Todora

Press

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