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An Ideal Landscape

February 9–March 27, 2021
980 Madison Avenue, New York

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © Theaster Gates, © Neil Jenney. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © Theaster Gates, © Neil Jenney. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © Neil Jenney, © Jonas Wood. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © Neil Jenney, © Jonas Wood. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © Jonas Wood, © Mary Weatherford. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © Jonas Wood, © Mary Weatherford. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © Mary Weatherford, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © Mary Weatherford, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © Urs Fischer, © Albert Oehlen. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © Urs Fischer, © Albert Oehlen. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © Albert Oehlen; © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © Albert Oehlen; © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © Jennifer Guidi. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © Jennifer Guidi. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © Jennifer Guidi, © Theaster Gates. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © Jennifer Guidi, © Theaster Gates. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view with Adam McEwen, Titanic Iceberg #3 (Blue) (2018) Artwork © Adam McEwen. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view with Adam McEwen, Titanic Iceberg #3 (Blue) (2018)

Artwork © Adam McEwen. Photo: Rob McKeever

Works Exhibited

Adam McEwen, Titanic Iceberg #3 (Blue), 2018 Inkjet print on cellulose sponge, 24 × 38 inches (61 × 96.5 cm)© Adam McEwen

Adam McEwen, Titanic Iceberg #3 (Blue), 2018

Inkjet print on cellulose sponge, 24 × 38 inches (61 × 96.5 cm)
© Adam McEwen

Neil Jenney, North America Depicted, 2009–10 Oil on wood, in painted wood artist’s frame, 41 × 46 × 3 ½ inches (104.1 × 116.8 × 8.9 cm)© Neil Jenney

Neil Jenney, North America Depicted, 2009–10

Oil on wood, in painted wood artist’s frame, 41 × 46 × 3 ½ inches (104.1 × 116.8 × 8.9 cm)
© Neil Jenney

Jonas Wood, Japanese Garden with Moon and Stars, 2020 Oil and acrylic on canvas, 72 × 70 inches (182.9 × 177.8 cm)© Jonas Wood

Jonas Wood, Japanese Garden with Moon and Stars, 2020

Oil and acrylic on canvas, 72 × 70 inches (182.9 × 177.8 cm)
© Jonas Wood

Mary Weatherford, The Frog, 2020 Flashe and neon on linen, 66 × 58 inches (167.6 × 147.3 cm)© Mary Weatherford

Mary Weatherford, The Frog, 2020

Flashe and neon on linen, 66 × 58 inches (167.6 × 147.3 cm)
© Mary Weatherford

Urs Fischer, Purple Fall, 2020 Aluminum composite panel, aluminum honeycomb, polyurethane adhesive, epoxy primer, gesso, solvent-based screen-printing paint, and water-based screen-printing paint, 96 × 76 ¾ inches (243.8 × 194.9 cm)© Urs Fischer

Urs Fischer, Purple Fall, 2020

Aluminum composite panel, aluminum honeycomb, polyurethane adhesive, epoxy primer, gesso, solvent-based screen-printing paint, and water-based screen-printing paint, 96 × 76 ¾ inches (243.8 × 194.9 cm)
© Urs Fischer

Albert Oehlen, Untitled, 2019 Acrylic on canvas, 84 ¼ × 72 ⅛ inches (214 × 183 cm)© Albert Oehlen

Albert Oehlen, Untitled, 2019

Acrylic on canvas, 84 ¼ × 72 ⅛ inches (214 × 183 cm)
© Albert Oehlen

Helen Frankenthaler, Peacock Alley, 1990 Acrylic on canvas, 70 ½ × 123 inches (179.1 × 312.4 cm)© 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Peacock Alley, 1990

Acrylic on canvas, 70 ½ × 123 inches (179.1 × 312.4 cm)
© 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Jennifer Guidi, Light on the Mountain (Painted Green Sand #7A, Light Pink-Pink-Orange-Yellow Sky, Dark Purple-Blue Mountain, Green Ground), 2020 Sand, acrylic, and oil on linen, 21 × 15 inches (53.3 × 38.1 cm)© Jennifer Guidi. Photo: Rob McKeever

Jennifer Guidi, Light on the Mountain (Painted Green Sand #7A, Light Pink-Pink-Orange-Yellow Sky, Dark Purple-Blue Mountain, Green Ground), 2020

Sand, acrylic, and oil on linen, 21 × 15 inches (53.3 × 38.1 cm)
© Jennifer Guidi. Photo: Rob McKeever

Theaster Gates, Red City, 2020 Industrial oil-based enamel, rubber torch down, bitumen, wood, and copper, 72 × 108 inches (182.9 × 274.3 cm)© Theaster Gates

Theaster Gates, Red City, 2020

Industrial oil-based enamel, rubber torch down, bitumen, wood, and copper, 72 × 108 inches (182.9 × 274.3 cm)
© Theaster Gates

Walton Ford, Euphrates, 2020 Watercolor, gouache, and ink on paper, 60 × 120 inches (152.4 × 304.8 cm)© Walton Ford

Walton Ford, Euphrates, 2020

Watercolor, gouache, and ink on paper, 60 × 120 inches (152.4 × 304.8 cm)
© Walton Ford

Georg Baselitz, Non lesso, ma duro, 2020 Oil on canvas, 118 ⅛ × 75 ⅝ inches (300 × 192 cm)© Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Non lesso, ma duro, 2020

Oil on canvas, 118 ⅛ × 75 ⅝ inches (300 × 192 cm)
© Georg Baselitz

About

Gagosian is pleased to present An Ideal Landscape, a group exhibition exploring contemporary approaches to the depiction of place.

Throughout the history of art, landscape painting has functioned as an important locus of visual symbolism. By situating classical allegories in idyllic pastoral settings, for example, seventeenth-century European artists such as Annibale Carracci and Nicolas Poussin were able to present an idealized view of the world that provided visual theater while also reflecting cultural mores. An Ideal Landscape takes a parallel yet converse approach for our times, presenting the genre as a vehicle for critique of the flawed and fraught social and political landscapes of today’s world.

Some works on view, such as Helen Frankenthaler’s luminous Peacock Alley (1990), conceive landscape as atmospheric abstraction, while others present imagined locations that capture their creators’ longing for alternative yet elusive states of being. Some artists literally incorporate elements of real environments to explore formal concerns relating to composition, medium, and color. Combining both new industrial materials and salvaged fragments from roofs that once sheltered human life, the scarred skyline of Theaster Gates’s suggestively titled Red City (2020) evokes the grit and precarity of urban existence. In the sunset scene of Light on the Mountain (2020), Jennifer Guidi takes a similarly unorthodox material approach; she incorporates sand into her oil paints, allowing her to make dimensional, mandala-like marks across the surface of her canvas in an exploration of the mystical and the meditative. Despite their vastly different methods and philosophies, the artists featured in An Ideal Landscape are united by a shared desire not only to portray the lived world—but also to reshape it.

The exhibition includes works by Georg Baselitz, Urs Fischer, Walton Ford, Helen Frankenthaler, Theaster Gates, Jennifer Guidi, Neil Jenney, Adam McEwen, Albert Oehlen, Ed Ruscha, Mary Weatherford, and Jonas Wood.

Edmund de Waal and Theaster Gates

Artist to Artist: Edmund de Waal and Theaster Gates

Join the artists for an extended conversation about their most recent exhibitions, their forebears in the world of ceramics, and the key role that history plays in their practices.

Jenny Saville’s Prism (2020) on the cover of Gagosian Quarterly magazine.

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Winter 2020

The Winter 2020 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring Jenny Saville’s Prism (2020) on its cover.

Alexander Calder poster for McGovern, 1972, lithograph

The Art History of Presidential Campaign Posters

Against the backdrop of the 2020 US presidential election, historian Hal Wert takes us through the artistic and political evolution of American campaign posters, from their origin in 1844 to the present. In an interview with Quarterly editor Gillian Jakab, Wert highlights an array of landmark posters and the artists who made them.

Ed Ruscha, At That, 2020, dry pigment and acrylic on paper.

“Things Fall Apart”: Ed Ruscha’s Swiped Words

Lisa Turvey examines the range of effects conveyed by the blurred phrases in recent drawings by the artist, detailing the ways these words in motion evoke the experience of the current moment.

Helen Frankenthaler, Cool Summer, 1962, oil on canvas, 69 ¾ × 120 inches (177.2 × 304.8 cm), Collection Helen Frankenthaler Foundation.

Building a Legacy
The Helen Frankenthaler Foundation on COVID-19 Relief Funding

The Quarterly’s Alison McDonald speaks with Clifford Ross, Frederick J. Iseman, and Dr. Lise Motherwell, members of the board of directors of the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, and Elizabeth Smith, executive director, about the foundation’s decision to establish a multiyear initiative dedicated to providing $5 million in covid-19 relief for artists and arts professionals.

The crowd at the public funeral of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., in April 1968. Photo by Moneta Sleet Jr.

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Fall 2020

The Fall 2020 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available.