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Nam June Paik

Art in Process: Part One

May 24–July 22, 2022
555 West 24th Street, New York

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Installation video

Installation view with Nam June Paik, Lion (2005) Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view with Nam June Paik, Lion (2005)

Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Works Exhibited

Nam June Paik, Life Rings, 1965 Magnetic copper coils, electrical tape, masking tape, string, videotape, electrical cords, microphone, and plastic foot switch, 48 × 44 inches (121.9 × 111.8 cm)© Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Nam June Paik, Life Rings, 1965

Magnetic copper coils, electrical tape, masking tape, string, videotape, electrical cords, microphone, and plastic foot switch, 48 × 44 inches (121.9 × 111.8 cm)
© Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Nam June Paik, Opus Paintings, 1975 Oil on canvas, in 32 parts, each: 10 × 8 inches (25.4 × 20.3 cm), overall dimensions variable© Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Nam June Paik, Opus Paintings, 1975

Oil on canvas, in 32 parts, each: 10 × 8 inches (25.4 × 20.3 cm), overall dimensions variable
© Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Nam June Paik, Zen for TV, 1963/1990 Manipulated color television and acrylic paint, 19 ½ × 17 × 17 inches (49.5 × 43.2 × 43.2 cm)© Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Nam June Paik, Zen for TV, 1963/1990

Manipulated color television and acrylic paint, 19 ½ × 17 × 17 inches (49.5 × 43.2 × 43.2 cm)
© Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Nam June Paik, One Candle, Candle Projection, 1988–2000 Candle, candle monitoring device, color monitor, closed-circuit video camera,video projectors, and video distribution amplifier, overall dimensions variable© Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Nam June Paik, One Candle, Candle Projection, 1988–2000

Candle, candle monitoring device, color monitor, closed-circuit video camera,video projectors, and video distribution amplifier, overall dimensions variable
© Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Nam June Paik, Beuys Projection, 1990 Single-channel video (color, sound), media player, and video distribution amplifier, overall dimensions variable© Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Nam June Paik, Beuys Projection, 1990

Single-channel video (color, sound), media player, and video distribution amplifier, overall dimensions variable
© Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Nam June Paik, 359 Canal Street, 1991 Desk with wood blocks from George Maciunas demolition, television chassis, piano key, newspaper clippings, pencil drawing, plastic sleeve, letters (authors include Ray Johnson, Yoko Ono, and Wolf Vostell), and acrylic paint, overall dimensions variable© Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Nam June Paik, 359 Canal Street, 1991

Desk with wood blocks from George Maciunas demolition, television chassis, piano key, newspaper clippings, pencil drawing, plastic sleeve, letters (authors include Ray Johnson, Yoko Ono, and Wolf Vostell), and acrylic paint, overall dimensions variable
© Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Nam June Paik, Bakelite Robot, 2002 Single-channel video (color, silent), LCD monitors, Bakelite radios, electric lights, media player, and permanent oil marker, 49 ½ × 58 × 7 inches (125.7 × 147.3 × 17.8 cm)© Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Nam June Paik, Bakelite Robot, 2002

Single-channel video (color, silent), LCD monitors, Bakelite radios, electric lights, media player, and permanent oil marker, 49 ½ × 58 × 7 inches (125.7 × 147.3 × 17.8 cm)
© Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Nam June Paik, “Mein Freund” (Joseph Beuys), 2003 Acrylic paint and permanent oil marker on photograph, 20 ¼ × 31 ¼ inches (51.4 × 79.4 cm)© Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Nam June Paik, “Mein Freund” (Joseph Beuys), 2003

Acrylic paint and permanent oil marker on photograph, 20 ¼ × 31 ¼ inches (51.4 × 79.4 cm)
© Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Nam June Paik, Chinese Memory, 2005 Single-channel video (color, silent), television, cabinet, record cover, scroll, antennae, books, acrylic paint, and permanent oil marker, in 16 parts, overall: 81 × 55 × 44 inches (205.7 × 139.7 × 111.8 cm)© Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Nam June Paik, Chinese Memory, 2005

Single-channel video (color, silent), television, cabinet, record cover, scroll, antennae, books, acrylic paint, and permanent oil marker, in 16 parts, overall: 81 × 55 × 44 inches (205.7 × 139.7 × 111.8 cm)
© Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Nam June Paik, Untitled, 2005 Single-channel video (color, silent), LCD monitor, vintage television, permanent oil marker, and acrylic paint, 19 ¾ × 18 ¼ × 21 ¼ inches (50.2 × 46.4 × 54 cm)© Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Nam June Paik, Untitled, 2005

Single-channel video (color, silent), LCD monitor, vintage television, permanent oil marker, and acrylic paint, 19 ¾ × 18 ¼ × 21 ¼ inches (50.2 × 46.4 × 54 cm)
© Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Nam June Paik, Lion, 2005 Three-channel video (color, silent), 2 plasma monitors, 26 CRT monitors, plywood, electrical cables, wood lion sculpture, wood platform, acrylic paint, and permanent oil marker, in 2 parts, overall: 133 × 109 × 65 inches (337.8 × 276.9 × 165.1 cm)© Nam June Paik Estate

Nam June Paik, Lion, 2005

Three-channel video (color, silent), 2 plasma monitors, 26 CRT monitors, plywood, electrical cables, wood lion sculpture, wood platform, acrylic paint, and permanent oil marker, in 2 parts, overall: 133 × 109 × 65 inches (337.8 × 276.9 × 165.1 cm)
© Nam June Paik Estate

Nam June Paik, Berlin Wall, 2005 Acrylic paint on graffitied segment of the Berlin Wall, 141 ½ × 47 ½ x 83 ½ inches (359.4 × 120.7 × 212.1 cm)© Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Nam June Paik, Berlin Wall, 2005

Acrylic paint on graffitied segment of the Berlin Wall, 141 ½ × 47 ½ x 83 ½ inches (359.4 × 120.7 × 212.1 cm)
© Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

About

There is no way to know in advance, because life has no “fast-forward” or “rewind” buttons. So, you go step by step, and if you make a mistake you try to correct it with another mistake.
—Nam June Paik

Gagosian is pleased to present Art in Process, a two-part survey of works by Nam June Paik (1932–2006) spanning his career. The first part of the exhibition will take place at Gagosian’s 555 West 24th Street location from May 24 to July 22, 2022. The second part will take place at Gagosian’s Park & 75 location from July 19 to August 26, 2022. This is the gallery’s second solo exhibition of Paik’s work, following the 2015 presentation of The Late Style in Hong Kong. It follows The Future Is Now, a retrospective organized by Tate Modern and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) that was presented at Tate Modern, London, and traveled to the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, SFMOMA, and National Gallery Singapore in 2021 and 2022. Art in Process is curated by John G. Hanhardt, who also organized the retrospectives Nam June Paik at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (1982), and Nam June Paik: Global Visionary at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC (2011), in addition to The Worlds of Nam June Paik at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York (2000).

Melding an early training in classical music and subsequent interest in musical composition with radical, collaborative approaches to aesthetics and performance, Paik produced multimedia works that introduced the technology of television into the realm of fine art. Born in Seoul, he moved to West Germany in 1956, where he became an influential member of the Fluxus group. Eight years later, he relocated to New York, further establishing himself as a figure in the countercultural and avant-garde movements of the 1960s. Paik’s extensive social network and international background laid the foundation for a global conception of art that straddled painting, sculpture, performance, music, and electronic imagery. An increasingly prescient and significant figure in today’s world of mass media and artificial intelligence, he cultivated moments of overlap, exchange, and symbiosis between the human body and its technological counterparts.

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555 West 24th Street, New York

555 West 24th Street
New York, NY 10011

+1 212 741 1111
newyork@gagosian.com

Hours: Monday–Friday 10–6

This gallery will be closed on July 4, 2022.

Press

Gagosian
Hallie Freer
hfreer@gagosian.com
+1 212 744 2313

Polskin Arts
Meagan Jones
meagan.jones@finnpartners.com
+1 212 593 6485

Julia Esposito
julia.esposito@finnpartners.com
+1 212 715 1643

News

Nam June Paik, Edited for Television, 1975 (still) © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: courtesy Electronic Arts Intermix

Screening

Nam June Paik’s Radical Fun

Thursday, June 30, 2022, 7:30pm
Anthology Film Archives, New York
anthologyfilmarchives.org

Join us for a video program that brings together a selection of Nam June Paik’s analog video works along with Internet-era works by artists including Ilana Harris-Babou, Frank Heath, Maggie Lee, Guthrie Lonergan, LoVid, and Martine Syms. The selection is curated by Rebecca Cleman, executive director at Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI), and copresented by Anthology Film Archives, EAI, and Gagosian, on the occasion of Art in Process, a two-part survey of works by Paik at Gagosian, New York.

Since the early 1960s, Paik’s prescient thinking about how artists can exploit television and computer technology has resonated through generations, particularly with regard to his mischievous opposition to industry conformity. His strongly held belief in the radical potential of fun, and his understanding of technological innovation as nurturing artistic innovation, have remained relevant through profound changes in communication platforms. To attend the event, purchase tickets at ticketing.uswest.veezi.com.

Nam June Paik, Edited for Television, 1975 (still) © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: courtesy Electronic Arts Intermix