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Fairs & Collecting

Online Viewing Room

Frieze Los Angeles 2020

February 10–19, 2020
gagosianviewingroom.com

Gagosian will launch its latest Online Viewing Room on the occasion of Frieze Los Angeles, with available works by Chris BurdenAlex Israel & Bret Easton EllisNeil JenneyAlbert Oehlen, Chris Ofili, David ReedEd Ruscha, Bill Whiskey Tjapaltjarri, Tatiana Trouvé, and Jonas WoodMany of the artworks included in this virtual presentation consider the political, geographical, and social landscapes of Los Angeles.

The Frieze Los Angeles 2020 Online Viewing Room will open at 12:00am on Monday, February 10, in Hong Kong, and close at 11:59pm on Wednesday, February 19, in Los Angeles and San Francisco. 

For more information about the Online Viewing Room or the work to be featured, please contact inquire@gagosian.com.

Download the full press release (PDF)

Chris Burden, L.A.P.D. Uniform, 1993 © 2020 Chris Burden/Licensed by the Chris Burden Estate and Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Chris Burden, L.A.P.D. Uniform, 1993 © 2020 Chris Burden/Licensed by the Chris Burden Estate and Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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Chris Burden, How to Shrink L.A., 1999 © 2020 Chris Burden/Licensed by the Chris Burden Estate and Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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How to Shrink L.A.

February 14–16, 2020, booth C06
Paramount Picture Studios, Los Angeles
frieze.com

Gagosian is pleased to participate in Frieze Los Angeles 2020. Taking Los Angeles’s system of highways as a literal and figurative backdrop, the selection includes Richard Prince’s full-scale car sculpture Untitled (2008) and Chris Burden’s ominously oversize L.A.P.D. Uniform (1993). The booth also includes work by Jean-Michel Basquiat, John Chamberlain, Urs Fischer, Theaster Gates, Piero Golia, Alex Israel, Sally Mann, Adam McEwen, Cady Noland, Sterling Ruby, Ed Ruscha, Taryn Simon, Robert Therrien, Andy Warhol, Tom Wesselmann, and others.

To receive a PDF with detailed information on the works in the booth, please contact the gallery at inquire@gagosian.com. To attend the fair, purchase tickets at frieze.com.

Download the full press release (PDF)

Chris Burden, How to Shrink L.A., 1999 © 2020 Chris Burden/Licensed by the Chris Burden Estate and Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Spencer Sweeney in his studio, New York, 2020. Artwork © Spencer Sweeney. Photo: Pete Sieper

galleryplatform.la

Spencer Sweeney
Faces

September 24–30, 2020

Sometimes you find a convergent expression of joy and pain, almost in the same breath. This is what interests me.
—Spencer Sweeney

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Sweeney’s paintings, drawings, and collages are alive with the same infectious energy as his multimedia environments, musical performances, and collaborative experiments. In the eight works on view, which were made between 2011 and 2020, the New York–based artist presents a vital and accessible take on the elemental formats of portrait and figure study, viewing them afresh through the mercurial lenses of popular culture and subjective experience. Inspired by the improvisational spirit of jazz, he produces intensely colored, boldly gestural images that reverberate with the amplified and distorted voices of art historical exemplars.

Spencer Sweeney in his studio, New York, 2020. Artwork © Spencer Sweeney. Photo: Pete Sieper

Nathaniel Mary Quinn. Photo: Ike Edeani

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Nathaniel Mary Quinn

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Nathaniel Mary Quinn. Photo: Ike Edeani

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