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Art Fair

Artmonte-Carlo Online

Sterling Ruby

April 30–May 31, 2020

Gagosian is pleased to participate in artmonte-carlo online 2020 with a trio of works by Sterling Ruby. This special digital presentation will include one of Ruby’s abstract, introspective WIDW paintings—titled after an elided form of the word “window”—as well as an entry from his DRFTRS series of hybrid collages resembling blasted landscapes. Also available will be one of Ruby’s ceramic vessels, which incorporate refired reclaimed clay fragments from his own studio.

To receive a PDF with detailed information on the works, please contact the gallery at inquire@gagosian.com.

Sterling Ruby, DRFTRS (7201), 2020 (detail) © Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, DRFTRS (7201), 2020 (detail) © Sterling Ruby

Works

Sterling Ruby: MORTAR (7217), 2020

Sterling Ruby
MORTAR (7217), 2020

Ceramic
5 ⅛ × 17 ¾ × 16 ½ inches (13 × 45.1 × 41.9 cm)

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Ceramics have always been central to Sterling Ruby’s practice. In works that range in form and size, from large basins to figurative totems, Ruby explores the medium’s capacity to express and freeze gestures.

In a process often involving multiple firings, the artist collects broken remnants from earlier pieces and incorporates them into new vessels, creating what he describes as “an autobiographical excavation, my own archaeology.”

Varied surface treatments and metallic glazes lend a simultaneously ancient and futuristic quality to the works. In this new series of ceramics, Ruby performs the same refiring method, integrating forms reminiscent of mortars.

Sterling Ruby: WIDW. YELLOW ARCHANGEL., 2019

Sterling Ruby
WIDW. YELLOW ARCHANGEL., 2019

Acrylic, oil, and cardboard on canvas
16 × 12 inches (40.6 × 30.5 cm)

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Sterling Ruby’s WIDW paintings—titled after the artist’s abbreviation for “window”—are executed in acrylic and oil paint on canvas, and incorporate collaged fragments of cardboard and textiles. Gestural and thickly applied paint in expressionistic and jarring color palettes veers into the obsessive, the unbalanced.

In WIDW. YELLOW ARCHANGEL., Ruby refers to Lamium galeobdolon, commonly known as yellow archangel, an invasive wildflower. Strips of painted cardboard bisect the canvas, echoing the “zips” of Barnett Newman. They evoke recurrent motifs in Ruby’s work: horizons, grids, flags, prison bars, windows.

The vantage point is deliberately ambiguous. Like Rorschach tests, we are left to determine for ourselves whether these are apocalyptic visions of a burning world, or the internal projections of the human mind.

Sterling Ruby: DRFTRS (7201), 2020

Sterling Ruby
DRFTRS (7201), 2020

Collage, paint, and glue on paper
11 × 8 ½ inches (27.9 × 21.6 cm)

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Executed on paper, the DRFTRS are hybrid collages that resemble blasted landscapes: photographic cutouts of bones, engine parts, stalagmites, and trash heaps are framed against a sky of explosive paint-splatter clouds.

Dwarfed by their surroundings, the collaged fragments drift across apocalyptic topographies, leaving only the most ephemeral of trails behind them.

Related News

Adam McEwen, Escape from New York, 2014 (still from “Battery Tunnel”) © Adam McEwen

Online Exhibition

Broadcast
Alternate Meanings in Film and Video

You’re only as young as the last time you changed your mind.
—Timothy Leary

Gagosian is pleased to present Broadcast: Alternate Meanings in Film and Video, an online exhibition of artists’ films and videos viewable exclusively on gagosian.com. The exhibition will be organized into a series of “chapters,” each lasting two weeks. The first chapter begins on Tuesday, May 19, 2020.

Broadcast: Alternate Meanings in Film and Video employs the innate immediacy of time-based art to spark reflection on the here and now, taking the words of famed psychologist and countercultural icon Timothy Leary as its starting point. 

Adam McEwen, Escape from New York, 2014 (still from “Battery Tunnel”) © Adam McEwen

Installation view, American Pastoral, Gagosian, Britannia Street, London, January 23–March 14, 2020. Artwork, left to right: © Theaster Gates, © Adam McEwen, Thomas Moran, © Richard Prince, © Banks Violette, © Ed Ruscha. Photo: Lucy Dawkins

Tour

American Pastoral

Thursday, March 5, 2020, 6:30pm
Gagosian, Britannia Street, London

Join Gagosian for a tour of the group exhibition American Pastoral. The show juxtaposes modern and contemporary works with historical American landscapes ranging from Albert Bierstadt’s depiction of the sublime in Sunset over the River (1877) to Edward Hopper’s tranquil seaside scene, Gloucester Harbor (1926). Gagosian’s Alice Godwin will focus on a select grouping of exhibited works that seek to challenge the idealized vision of the American Dream that has long been a rich topic of inquiry for artists in the United States. To attend the free event, RSVP to londontours@gagosian.com. Space is limited.

Installation view, American Pastoral, Gagosian, Britannia Street, London, January 23–March 14, 2020. Artwork, left to right: © Theaster Gates, © Adam McEwen, Thomas Moran, © Richard Prince, © Banks Violette, © Ed Ruscha. Photo: Lucy Dawkins

Chris Burden, How to Shrink L.A., 1999 © 2020 Chris Burden/Licensed by the Chris Burden Estate and Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Art Fair

Frieze Los Angeles 2020
How to Shrink L.A.

February 14–16, 2020, booth C06
Paramount Picture Studios, Los Angeles
frieze.com

Gagosian is pleased to participate in Frieze Los Angeles 2020. Taking Los Angeles’s system of highways as a literal and figurative backdrop, the selection includes Richard Prince’s full-scale car sculpture Untitled (2008) and Chris Burden’s ominously oversize L.A.P.D. Uniform (1993). The booth also includes work by Jean-Michel Basquiat, John Chamberlain, Urs Fischer, Theaster Gates, Piero Golia, Alex Israel, Sally Mann, Adam McEwen, Cady Noland, Sterling Ruby, Ed Ruscha, Taryn Simon, Robert Therrien, Andy Warhol, Tom Wesselmann, and others.

To receive a PDF with detailed information on the works in the booth, please contact the gallery at inquire@gagosian.com. To attend the fair, purchase tickets at frieze.com.

Download the full press release (PDF)

Chris Burden, How to Shrink L.A., 1999 © 2020 Chris Burden/Licensed by the Chris Burden Estate and Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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Museum Exhibitions

Shio Kusaka, (line 5), 2010 © Shio Kusaka

On View

Making Knowing
Craft in Art, 1950–2019

November 22, 2019–January 2021
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
whitney.org

Making Knowing: Craft in Art, 1950–2019 foregrounds how visual artists have explored the materials, methods, and strategies of craft over the past seven decades. Some expand techniques with long histories, such as weaving, sewing, or pottery, while others experiment with clay, beads, and glass, among other mediums. Work by Richard Artschwager, Mike Kelley, Shio Kusaka, and Sterling Ruby is included.

Shio Kusaka, (line 5), 2010 © Shio Kusaka

Installation view, Sterling Ruby, Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, February 26–May 26, 2020. Artwork © Sterling Ruby

Closed

Sterling Ruby

February 26–May 26, 2020
Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston
www.icaboston.org

Since his earliest works, Sterling Ruby has investigated the role of the artist as an outsider. Critiquing the structures of modernism and traditional institutions, he addresses the repressed underpinnings of contemporary culture and the coding of power and violence. This exhibition features more than one hundred works in an array of mediums spanning more than two decades of his practice. This show has traveled from the Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami.

Installation view, Sterling Ruby, Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, February 26–May 26, 2020. Artwork © Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, ACTS/WS ROLLIN, 2011, Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami © Sterling Ruby. Photo: Robert Wedemeyer

Closed

Sterling Ruby

November 7, 2019–February 2, 2020
Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami
icamiami.org

Since his earliest works, Sterling Ruby has investigated the role of the artist as an outsider. Critiquing the structures of modernism and traditional institutions, he addresses the repressed underpinnings of contemporary culture and the coding of power and violence. This exhibition features more than one hundred works in an array of mediums spanning more than two decades of his practice. This show will travel to the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, in February.

Sterling Ruby, ACTS/WS ROLLIN, 2011, Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami © Sterling Ruby. Photo: Robert Wedemeyer

Sterling Ruby, BASKET (6111), 2016 © Sterling Ruby

Closed

Strange

August 21, 2019–January 19, 2020
University of California, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
bampfa.org

A century after the Surrealist movement exploded across the global cultural scene, celebrating the improbable, uncanny, and mysterious, the “strange” remains a source of fascination and artistic inspiration today. Strange features works from Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive’s collection that invoke strangeness and resonate with the spirit of Surrealism. Work by Sterling Ruby and Cindy Sherman is included.

Sterling Ruby, BASKET (6111), 2016 © Sterling Ruby

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