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Vera Lutter

Fragments of Time Past

January 7–20, 2021

Nothing is solid in memory. Our minds only hold on to traces, outlines—and that is what my photographs portray.
—Vera Lutter

Gagosian is pleased to present Fragments of Time Past, a selection of photographs by Vera Lutter online for galleryplatform.la.

Since the 1990s, Lutter has used a camera obscura to produce large black-and-white photographs of buildings, landscapes, and urban and industrial sites. Reveling in the directness of this technique, she produces unique prints that imbue physical environments and buildings with an ethereal stillness. Reinterpreting familiar panoramas, Lutter erases fleeting human presence and collapses the movement of wind and water in long-exposure images that prompt reflection on the passage of time.

In Fragments of Time Past, Lutter depicts four different ancient and historical sites: the pyramids at Giza, the ancient Greek temples at Paestum, the eleventh-century Maria Laach Benedictine abbey in Germany, and the distinctive waterways and buildings of Venice during the city’s yearly acqua alta flood season. Presented in a monochromatic photonegative palette, these iconic landmarks and relics take on a new and uncanny visual life: lively canals are smoothed to glossy stillness and solid ground drops away, leaving behind skeletal architectural structures silhouetted against black skies.

Vera Lutter in her studio, New York, 2020. Artwork © Vera Lutter. Photo: Lukas Vogt

Vera Lutter in her studio, New York, 2020. Artwork © Vera Lutter. Photo: Lukas Vogt

Related News

Still from “Vera Lutter: Museum in the Artist’s Camera Obscura”

Video

Vera Lutter
Museum in the Artist’s Camera Obscura

This short film, produced by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), features rare behind-the-scenes footage of Vera Lutter, her assistants, and the LACMA staff, filmed during the artist’s residency at the institution. Lutter and museum curator Jennifer King offer their insights into the artistic process and discuss the meanings they find in these dreamlike photographs.

Still from “Vera Lutter: Museum in the Artist’s Camera Obscura”

Vera Lutter, Cold Spring, IX: February 17, 2014, 2014

In Conversation

Vera Lutter
Martin Barnes

Friday, May 18, 2018, 2:30–3:30pm
Somerset House, London
photolondon.org

On the occasion of Photo London, Vera Lutter and Martin Barnes, senior curator of photographs at the Victoria and Albert Museum, will speak about Lutter’s exploration of light, time, and movement and her use of a room-sized camera obscura to capture architecture, urban landscapes, and industrial sites. The pair will also discuss her decision to retain the negative image and refrain from multiplication or reproduction. To attend the event, purchase tickets at photolondon.org.

Vera Lutter, Cold Spring, IX: February 17, 2014, 2014

Vera Lutter, The Death of Lucretia: February 10, 2017, 2017 © Vera Lutter

In Conversation

Vera Lutter
Michael Govan

Monday, March 12, 2018, 7:30pm
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
www.lacma.org

The Los Angeles County Museum of Art’s Director Michael Govan will speak with Vera Lutter about her ongoing artist residency at LACMA. Since January 2017, Lutter has been documenting the museum using camera obscura, creating photographs that examine the museum’s exterior architecture, gallery interiors, and permanent collection. Govan and Lutter will discuss the artist’s process, and how her project offers a unique perspective on LACMA’s history and future. To attend the free event, reserve tickets at www.lacma.org.

Vera Lutter, The Death of Lucretia: February 10, 2017, 2017 © Vera Lutter

See all News for Vera Lutter

Museum Exhibitions

Taryn Simon, Oxalis tuberosa, Peru (7CFR) (prohibited), 2010, from the series Contraband, 2010 © Taryn Simon

Closed

Civilisation, Photography, Now

June 13–October 18, 2020
Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki, New Zealand
www.aucklandartgallery.com

Civilisation, Photography, Now features more than two hundred works from one hundred international photographers. The exhibition considers patterns of mass behavior and the complexities of life in twenty-first-century urban environments. This show originated at the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Seoul, as Civilization: The Way We Live Now. Work by Mike Kelley, Vera Lutter, and Taryn Simon is included.

Taryn Simon, Oxalis tuberosa, Peru (7CFR) (prohibited), 2010, from the series Contraband, 2010 © Taryn Simon

Vera Lutter, LACMA from the Bridge, III: April 3–5, 2017, 2017 © Vera Lutter

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Vera Lutter
Museum in the Camera

March 29–August 9, 2020
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
www.lacma.org

Between February 2017 and January 2019, Vera Lutter documented the Los Angeles County Museum of Art using a camera obscura, creating photographs that examine the museum’s exterior architecture, gallery interiors, and permanent collection.

Vera Lutter, LACMA from the Bridge, III: April 3–5, 2017, 2017 © Vera Lutter

Vera Lutter, Clock Tower, Brooklyn, XXXVI: June 16, 2009, 2009 © Vera Lutter

Closed

Civilization
The Way We Live Now

September 13, 2019–February 2, 2020
National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia
www.ngv.vic.gov.au

Civilization: The Way We Live Now features more than two hundred works from one hundred international photographers. The exhibition considers patterns of mass behavior and the complexities of life in twenty-first-century urban environments. This show originated at the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Seoul. Work by Mike Kelley, Vera Lutter, and Taryn Simon is included. 

Vera Lutter, Clock Tower, Brooklyn, XXXVI: June 16, 2009, 2009 © Vera Lutter

Taryn Simon, Oxalis tuberosa, Peru (7CFR) (prohibited), 2010, from the series Contraband, 2010 © Taryn Simon

Closed

Civilization
The Way We Live Now

March 9–May 19, 2019
Ullens Center for Contemporary Art, Beijing
ucca.org.cn

Civilization: The Way We Live Now features more than two hundred works from one hundred international photographers. The show addresses and illuminates major aspects of our increasingly global civilization and stresses the fact that contemporary society is an extremely complex collective enterprise. Work by Mike Kelley, Vera Lutter, and Taryn Simon is included. This show originated at the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Seoul.

Taryn Simon, Oxalis tuberosa, Peru (7CFR) (prohibited), 2010, from the series Contraband, 2010 © Taryn Simon

See all Museum Exhibitions for Vera Lutter