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In Conversation

Brett Littman and Miwako Tezuka
on Arakawa and Isamu Noguchi

Sunday, March 17, 2019, 2pm
Christie’s New York
www.christies.com

With their expansively imaginative works, New York–based artists of Japanese descent Arakawa and Isamu Noguchi both pushed artistic, conceptual, and ideological limits throughout their lives, probing the line between art and design as well as borders within cultural identities. Brett Littman, director of the Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum, will be in conversation with Miwako Tezuka, consulting curator of Arakawa and Madeline Gins’s Reversible Destiny Foundation, to discuss the kinship between these artists in terms of their genre-defying interests and activities. The event is free and open to the public.

Arakawa, That in Which No. 2, 1974–75 © Estate of Madeline Gins. Reproduced with permission of the Estate of Madeline Gins

Arakawa, That in Which No. 2, 1974–75 © Estate of Madeline Gins. Reproduced with permission of the Estate of Madeline Gins

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Arakawa, And/Or in Profile No. 2, 1974 © Estate of Madeline Gins. Reproduced with permission of the Estate of Madeline Gins

Tour

Arakawa
Diagrams for the Imagination

Saturday, April 6, 2019, 2pm
Gagosian, 980 Madison Avenue, New York

Stephen Hepworth will lead a tour of the exhibition Arakawa: Diagrams for the Imagination at Gagosian, 980 Madison Avenue, New York. This show examines the works Arakawa made in the two decades following his 1961 arrival in New York, a period during which he worked in two dimensions, using paint, ink, graphite, and assemblage on canvas and paper. To attend the free event, RSVP to nytours@gagosian.com.

Arakawa, And/Or in Profile No. 2, 1974 © Estate of Madeline Gins. Reproduced with permission of the Estate of Madeline Gins

Arakawa, Why Not (A Serenade of Eschatological Ecology), 1969 © 2017 Estate of Madeline Gins. Reproduced with permission of the Estate of Madeline Gins and Reversible Destiny Foundation

Screening

Arakawa
Why Not (A Serenade of Eschatological Ecology)

Monday, October 16, 2017, 7pm
National Sawdust, Brooklyn, New York
www.nationalsawdust.org

Arakawa’s film Why Not (A Serenade of Eschatological Ecology) (1969) will be screened. Renowned for his paintings, drawings, prints, and visionary architectural constructions, the artist's wide range of experimentation extended into filmmaking. There will be a discussion after the film with Peter Katz, Diana Seo Hyung Lee, Jay Sanders, and Miwako Tezuka. To attend the event, purchase tickets at www.nationalsawdust.org.

Arakawa, Why Not (A Serenade of Eschatological Ecology), 1969 © 2017 Estate of Madeline Gins. Reproduced with permission of the Estate of Madeline Gins and Reversible Destiny Foundation

Arakawa, Waiting Voices, 1976–77 © 2016 Estate of Madeline Gins. Reproduced with permission of the Estate of Madeline Gins

New Representation

Arakawa

Gagosian is pleased to announce its representation of the artwork of Arakawa on behalf of the Estate of Madeline Gins and the Reversible Destiny Foundation, a foundation established by Arakawa and Gins.

Arakawa, Waiting Voices, 1976–77 © 2016 Estate of Madeline Gins. Reproduced with permission of the Estate of Madeline Gins

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