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Book Signing

Alex Israel
SPF-18

Thursday, April 11, 2019, 6–9pm, booth H13
Geffen Contemporary at MOCA, Los Angeles
laartbookfair.net

During the opening night of the LA Art Book Fair, Alex Israel will sign copies of his new book, SPF-18, at Westreich Wagner’s booth. This publication accompanies the artist’s 2017 feature film of the same name and includes on-set photography, behind-the-scenes imagery, and the full script. It is a beautifully illustrated artist book that visually narrates the film’s storyline and documents the filmmaking process, co-published by Gagosian and Westreich Wagner. To attend the event, purchase tickets at www.printedmatter.org.

Alex Israel: SPF-18 (New York: Gagosian; New York: Westreich Wagner, 2019)

Alex Israel: SPF-18 (New York: Gagosian; New York: Westreich Wagner, 2019)

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Installation view, Alex Israel: Always On My Mind, Gagosian, Grosvenor Hill, London, January 16–March 14, 2020. Artwork © Alex Israel. Photo: Lucy Dawkins

Tour

Alex Israel
Always On My Mind

Wednesday, February 26, 2020, 6:15pm
Gagosian, Grosvenor Hill, London

Join Gagosian for a tour of Alex Israel: Always On My Mind, an exhibition of new Self-Portraits by the artist, led by Gagosian director Millicent Wilner. In this ongoing series of photorealistic paintings, Israel frames quintessential Los Angeles scenery and snippets from his daily life inside crisp cut-out silhouettes of his own profile. The artist addresses the effortless visual gloss that twenty-first-century image culture and social media demand of their participants. To attend the free event, RSVP to londontours@gagosian.com. Space is limited.

Installation view, Alex Israel: Always On My Mind, Gagosian, Grosvenor Hill, London, January 16–March 14, 2020. Artwork © Alex Israel. Photo: Lucy Dawkins

Bettina Korek, Hans Ulrich Obrist, and Alex Israel

Seminar

Alex Israel, Bettina Korek, Hans Ulrich Obrist

July 29–August 2, 2019, 10am–3pm
Anderson Ranch Arts Center, Snowmass Village, Colorado
www.andersonranch.org

Alex Israel, Bettina Korek, and Hans Ulrich Obrist will host a five-day seminar for practicing artists at Anderson Ranch. Through lectures, discussions, readings, and critiques, the trio will guide artists deeper into the concepts behind their work and their agency in the art world.

Bettina Korek, Hans Ulrich Obrist, and Alex Israel

Alex Israel, SPF-18, 2017 (film still) © Alex Israel

Screening

Alex Israel
SPF-18

Sunday, July 29, 2018, 6pm
Southampton Arts Center, New York
www.southamptonartscenter.org

Alex Israel’s 2017 film SPF-18 will be screened at the Southampton Art Center. The artist will introduce the film followed by a conversation with Israel and Giulia D’Agnolo Vallan, film writer and curator. To attend the event, purchase tickets at southamptonartscenter.org.

Alex Israel, SPF-18, 2017 (film still) © Alex Israel

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