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Book Signing

Jonas Wood

Thursday, December 12, 2019, 6–8pm
Geffen Contemporary at MOCA, Los Angeles
www.moca.org

Jonas Wood will be signing copies of his new self-titled monograph, published by Phaidon. This monograph—the first on the artist’s work—brings together his most significant paintings and drawings and reveals the vast array of his sources. The book includes contributions by curators Helen Molesworth and Ian Alteveer, as well as a conversation between Wood and Mark Grotjahn. The event is free and open to the public.

Jonas Wood (New York: Phaidon, 2019)

Jonas Wood (New York: Phaidon, 2019)

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Jonas Wood (New York: Gagosian, 2019)

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Jonas Wood (New York: Gagosian, 2019)

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Shio Kusaka and Jonas Wood. Photo: Ruud Baan

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Private residence, Aspen, Colorado
www.andersonranch.org

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Shio Kusaka and Jonas Wood. Photo: Ruud Baan

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