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Screening

The Films and Videos of Richard Serra

January 23–March 5, 2020
Whitney Humanities Center, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut
whc.yale.edu

Over three evenings—January 23, February 20, and March 5—Yale University’s Whitney Humanities Center, in collaboration with Gagosian, will screen Richard Serra’s films and videos, drawn from the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Anthology Film Archives, New York; and the artist Joan Jonas. Chrissie Iles, curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, will introduce the presentation on February 20, which will be followed by a post-screening discussion between Iles and Joanna Fiduccia from Yale’s Department of the History of Art. Fiduccia will introduce the screening on March 5. The event is free and open to the public. 

Richard Serra and Clara Weyergraf, Steelmill/Stahlwerk, 1979 (still), Museum of Modern Art, New York © 2020 Richard Serra/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Richard Serra and Clara Weyergraf, Steelmill/Stahlwerk, 1979 (still), Museum of Modern Art, New York © 2020 Richard Serra/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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Richard Serra, Hand Catching Lead, 1968 (still), Museum of Modern Art, New York © 2022 Richard Serra/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Screening

The Films and Videos of Richard Serra

January 5, 7, 8, and 9, 2022
Centre Pompidou, Paris
www.centrepompidou.fr

In conjunction with the installation of Richard Serra’s sculpture Transmitter (2020) at Gagosian, Le Bourget, the gallery and Centre Pompidou, Paris, will present a four-day retrospective of the artist’s films and videos, drawn from the collections of the Centre Pompidou; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; and Anthology Film Archives, New York. This is the first time that all of Serra’s film and video work will be shown together in Europe. Each of the six screenings will be introduced by an esteemed curator or scholar, including Eric de Bruyn, Enrico Camporesi, Søren Grammel, Marcella Lista, Philippe-Alain Michaud, and Marie Muracciole. The event is free and open to the public.

Richard Serra, Hand Catching Lead, 1968 (still), Museum of Modern Art, New York © 2022 Richard Serra/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Richard Serra, Hands Tied, 1968 (still), Museum of Modern Art, New York © 2020 Richard Serra/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Screening

The Films and Videos of Richard Serra

January 27–February 9, 2020
Harvard Film Archive, Cambridge, Massachusetts
harvardfilmarchive.org

Over four evenings—January 27 and February 3, 7, and 9—Harvard Film Archive will screen Richard Serra’s films and videos, drawn from the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Anthology Film Archives; and Joan Jonas. Benjamin Buchloh will introduce the screening on Monday, January 27. To attend the event, purchase tickets at the box office. The box office opens forty-five minutes prior to the screening time.

Richard Serra, Hands Tied, 1968 (still), Museum of Modern Art, New York © 2020 Richard Serra/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Richard Serra, Transmitter, 2020 © 2022 Richard Serra/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Thomas Lannes

Performance

Quartet for the End of Time
in Richard Serra’s “Transmitter”

Sunday, May 8, 2022, 4pm
Gagosian, Le Bourget

Join Gagosian and Bold Tendencies, a nonprofit organization that commissions artists to produce site-specific projects and present performances, for a live concert of Olivier Messiaen’s Quatuor pour la fin du temps (Quartet for the End of Time). Written in 1941 during the French composer’s imprisonment in a German labor camp, the powerful piece comprises eight movements for clarinet, violin, cello and piano. It will be performed by musicians Nicolas Baldeyrou, Mario Brunello, Alina Ibragimova, and Samson Tsoy both within and beside Richard Serra’s sculpture Transmitter (2020), creating a dialogue between sound, material, and space. To attend the event, register at eventbrite.com.

Richard Serra, Transmitter, 2020 © 2022 Richard Serra/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Thomas Lannes

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