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Chris Burden
Streetlamps

Chris Burden: Streetlamps is available for online reading from August 9 through September 7 as part of the From the Library series. The comprehensive book explores Chris Burden’s iconic work with antique streetlamps. Five major streetlamp sculptures are highlighted, all of which are lavishly documented from conception through installation. The works are further illuminated with texts by Russell Ferguson, Christopher Bedford, and George Roberts; a conversation between Michael Govan and Chris Burden; and a photo essay by Ari Marcopoulos. This was the 500th book the gallery published, which was an exciting and fitting publication to mark the achievement as Burden was among the first artists to work with Larry Gagosian, starting in 1976.

Chris Burden: Streetlamps (New York: Gagosian, 2017)

Chris Burden: Streetlamps (New York: Gagosian, 2017)

Related News

Poster to commemorate Chris Burden’s seventy-fifth birthday

Design

Chris Burden
75th Birthday Poster

To celebrate what would have been the artist’s seventy-fifth birthday this year, the Chris Burden Estate is sharing a free poster that can be downloaded and printed at home. Designed by Estate director Erica Mercado, the poster features an archival drawing by Burden of his plans for Wexner Castle (1990), currently on view at the Wexner Center for the Arts in Columbus, Ohio, as part of the exhibition Climate Changing: On Artists, Institutions, and the Social Environment. The Estate will continue to commemorate this important moment throughout the year, sharing updates about the artist through their newsletter.

Download the poster (PDF)

Poster to commemorate Chris Burden’s seventy-fifth birthday

Chris Burden, Big Wrench, 1980 (still) © 2019 Chris Burden/Licensed by the Chris Burden Estate and Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York 

Screening and Visit

Chris Burden
Big Wrench

Friday, January 18, 2019, 6–8pm
Gagosian, Britannia Street, London

Join Gagosian Quarterly and MUBI for a screening of Chris Burden’s Big Wrench (1980) at Gagosian, Britannia Street, London. The event also provides a special opportunity to see the exhibition Chris Burden: Measured after hours before it closes on January 26, 2019. The short film will be shown at 6:10pm, 6:30pm, 6:50pm, 7:10pm, and 7:30pm. To attend the free event, RSVP to rsvplondon@gagosian.com

Chris Burden, Big Wrench, 1980 (still) © 2019 Chris Burden/Licensed by the Chris Burden Estate and Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York 

Chris Burden: Street Lamps (New York: Gagosian, 2017)

500th Book

Chris Burden
Streetlamps

Chris Burden: Streetlamps explores the artist’s iconic work with antique streetlamps. Five major streetlamp sculptures are highlighted, all of which are lavishly documented from conception through installation. The works are further illuminated with texts by Russell Ferguson, Christopher Bedford, and George Roberts; a conversation between Michael Govan and Chris Burden; and a photo essay by Ari Marcopoulos. This is the 500th book the gallery has published. It is an exciting and fitting publication to mark this achievement as Burden was among the first artists to work with Larry Gagosian, starting in 1976. Order the book at the Gagosian Shop.

Chris Burden: Street Lamps (New York: Gagosian, 2017)

Takashi Murakami cover and Andreas Gursky cover for Gagosian Quarterly, Summer 2022 magazine

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Summer 2022

The Summer 2022 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, with two different covers—featuring Takashi Murakami’s 108 Bonnō MURAKAMI.FLOWERS (2022) and Andreas Gursky’s Viktor & Rolf II (2022).

A Takashi Murakami painting of a female avatar with blue and pink hair: CLONE X #59 Harajuku-style Angel

Takashi Murakami and RTFKT: An Arrow through History

Bridging the digital and the physical realms, the three-part presentation of paintings and sculptures that make up Takashi Murakami: An Arrow through History at Gagosian, New York, builds on the ongoing collaboration between the artist and RTFKT Studios. Here, Murakami and the RTFKT team explain the collaborative process, the necessity of cognitive revolution, the metaverse, and the future of art to the Quarterly’s Wyatt Allgeier.

Andreas Gursky, Salinas, 2021, Diasec-mounted inkjet print, framed: 80 × 160 ⅜ × 2 ½ inches (203.2 × 407.2 × 6.2 cm)

Andreas Gursky

On the occasion of an exhibition at Gagosian, New York, from May 5 to June 18, 2022, Max Dax met with Andreas Gursky to speak with the photographer about his new work. Here, they discuss the consequences of the pandemic on certain works, the roles of techno music and art history in Gursky’s art process, and the necessary balance of beauty and honesty in the contemporary.

Alexandria Smith, London, 2022. Photo: © Amoroso Films

Alexandria Smith

The artist speaks with author Nalo Hopkinson about what it means to depict the body, the struggles to embark on new projects, and the contours of space and place in the creation of fiction and art.

Mary Weatherford, The Flaying of Marsyas—4500 Triphosphor, 2021–22 (detail), Flashe and neon on linen, 93 × 79 inches (236.2 × 200.7 cm). Photo: Fredrik Nilsen Studio

Mary Weatherford: The Flaying of Marsyas

Coinciding with the 59th Venice Biennale, an exhibition at the Museo di Palazzo Grimani in Venice presents new paintings by Mary Weatherford inspired by Titian’s The Flaying of Marsyas (1570–76). Francine Prose traces the development of these works.

Simon Hantaï cutting out a monumental yellow Tabula (1981), Meun, France, 1995. Artwork © Archives Simon Hantaï/ADAGP, Paris. Photo: Antonio Semeraro

Simon Hantaï: Les blancs de la couleur, la couleur du blanc

Anne Baldassari reflects on the art historical influences and radical breaks reflected in the artist’s work with color.

Peter Paul Rubens’s The Massacre of the Innocents (c. 1610)

Spotlight
Peter Paul Rubens

Larry Gagosian reflects on Peter Paul Rubens’s The Massacre of the Innocents (c. 1610).

Robert Mapplethorpe wearing a selection of his jewelry, New York, 1971. Photo: Valerie Santagto

Robert Mapplethorpe’s Jewelry: Gaia Repossi and Michael Ward Stout

As part of an ongoing collaboration, Gaia Repossi, creative director for the Paris jewelry house Repossi, has created a collection of pieces inspired by Robert Mapplethorpe’s art practice and jewelry. Speaking with Michael Ward Stout, president of the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation, and the Quarterly’s Wyatt Allgeier, Repossi recounts the origins of this project and details her deep admiration for the artist’s precision and eye for composition.

Tatiana Trouvé’s studio, Montreuil, France, 2021

In Conversation
Tatiana Trouvé and Jean-Michel Geneste

Tatiana Trouvé speaks with Jean-Michel Geneste, archaeologist and curator, about the paradoxes of her practice: absence and presence, the ancient and the contemporary, the natural and the human-made.

Installation view, Georg Baselitz: Archinto, Museo di Palazzo Grimani, Venice, May 19, 2021–November 27, 2022. Photo: Matteo De Fina

Georg Baselitz: Archinto

On the occasion of Georg Baselitz: Archinto at Museo di Palazzo Grimani, Venice, Artcore Films produced a short documentary featuring the artist. In the video, Baselitz details the origins of the project, how he approached the unique space, and his experiments in process and technique.

Shirley Clarke behind a camera on the set of The Connection (1961).

Shirley Clarke’s Indefinite Truths

Rennie McDougall traces the blurred line between truth and fiction in the cinema of Shirley Clarke, with particular attention to the 1967 documentary Portrait of Jason. From her early dance films to later feature-length movies, themes of race, performance, and the body emerge in Clarke’s examination of the real.

Portrait of Rick Owens

Fashion and Art: Rick Owens

Derek Blasberg speaks with fashion designer Rick Owens, the American-born, Paris-based director of the eponymous brand, about his influences from the worlds of art and music, growing up without a television, and the sinister pleasures of the museum.