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Douglas Dreishpoon
on Helen Frankenthaler

Wednesday, June 16, 2021, 4pm EDT

On the occasion of Helen Frankenthaler: Late Works, 1990–2003 at the Weatherspoon Art Museum, University of North Carolina, Greensboro, exhibition curator Douglas Dreishpoon, director of the Helen Frankenthaler catalogue raisonné, will discuss the works on view. Frankenthaler’s invention of the soak-stain technique expanded abstract painting’s possibilities while referencing figuration and landscape in unique ways. During the 1990s, as her practice continued to evolve through the use of diverse media and processes, she naturally transitioned from tackling canvases on the floor to using larger sheets of paper laid out on the floor or on tabletops for easier accessibility. To attend the online event, register at uncg.zoom.us.

Douglas Dreishpoon

Douglas Dreishpoon

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