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Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Lil’ Barbara, 2017 © Nathaniel Mary Quinn

On View

Person of Interest

Through July 3, 2021
Sheldon Museum of Art, University of Nebraska–Lincoln
sheldonartmuseum.org

Exploring nuances in portraiture from the late nineteenth century to today—and testing the very definition of the genre—Person of Interest presents depictions of the literal and abstracted body from Sheldon’s rich holdings and selected loans. This exhibition asks open-ended questions about self-fashioning, cultural memory, gender identity, and the performance of identity. In doing so, it prompts conversations about race and representation, institutional power, and lived experiences. Work by Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Jenny Saville, and Cindy Sherman is included.

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Lil’ Barbara, 2017 © Nathaniel Mary Quinn

Ed Ruscha, Mocha Standard, 1969 © Ed Ruscha

On View

Ed Ruscha
OKLA

Through July 5, 2021
Oklahoma Contemporary, Oklahoma City
oklahomacontemporary.org

Over the past six decades, Ed Ruscha has produced a diverse and highly influential body of work encompassing paintings, drawings, prints, books, photographs, and films. OKLA focuses on the artist’s Oklahoma roots—his family, his upbringing, and his discovery of his calling as an artist. It is also, remarkably, his first solo museum exhibition in his home state. Ruscha lived in Oklahoma City from the ages of five to eighteen—a formative period in both his life and his artistic sensibility. His Midwestern childhood had a profound impact on his art, which the exhibition explores through around seventy-five works from all phases of his career.

Ed Ruscha, Mocha Standard, 1969 © Ed Ruscha

Georg Baselitz, Porträt Elke I (Portrait of Elke I), 1969, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of the Baselitz Family, 2020 © Georg Baselitz. Photo: Jochen Littkemann

On View

Georg Baselitz
Pivotal Turn

Through July 18, 2021
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
www.metmuseum.org

Georg Baselitz: Pivotal Turn displays six landmark paintings gifted by the artist to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in honor of its 150th anniversary. Made in 1969, they are among the first works in which Baselitz employed the strategy of inversion, an approach that continues to be of interest to him. The paintings mark a critical moment in the artist’s career as he sought to expunge narrative content and expression from his workin order to focus on painting itself.

Georg Baselitz, Porträt Elke I (Portrait of Elke I), 1969, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of the Baselitz Family, 2020 © Georg Baselitz. Photo: Jochen Littkemann

Ellen Gallagher, Untitled, 1995 © Ellen Gallagher

On View

Ellen Gallagher in
Beyond Infinity: Contemporary Art after Kusama

Through July 18, 2021
Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston
www.icaboston.org

This exhibition provides visitors with a deeper understanding of how the immersive environment of Yayoi Kusama’s LOVE IS CALLING (2013) embodies the artist’s long-standing exploration of accumulation, repetition, luminescence, life and death, and happenings. Works featuring Kusama’s obsessive repetition of symbols, patterns, and forms are paired with works by contemporaries as well as those by current practitioners such as Ellen Gallagher.

Ellen Gallagher, Untitled, 1995 © Ellen Gallagher

Installation view, Henry Moore: Il Disegno dello scultore, Museo Novecento, Florence, Italy, January 18–July 18, 2021. Artwork: Reproduced by permission of the Henry Moore Foundation. Photo: Serge Domingie

On View

Henry Moore
Il Disegno dello scultore

Through July 18, 2021
Museo Novecento, Florence, Italy
www.museonovecento.it

Presented in collaboration with the Henry Moore Foundation, this exhibition, whose title translates to The Sculptor’s Drawing, explores the relationship between drawing and sculpture in Henry Moore’s work and includes more than seventy drawings as well as graphics and sculptures. Through the analysis of recurring iconographic themes such as natural forms (rocks, pebbles, roots, and trunks), animals, skulls, and the artist’s hands, the exhibition seeks to deepen the conceptual and formal genesis of Moore’s work.

Installation view, Henry Moore: Il Disegno dello scultore, Museo Novecento, Florence, Italy, January 18–July 18, 2021. Artwork: Reproduced by permission of the Henry Moore Foundation. Photo: Serge Domingie

Installation view, Ed Ruscha: Artist Rooms, Tate Modern, London, July 26, 2019–July 18, 2021. Artwork © Ed Ruscha. Photo © Tate (Oliver Cowling)

On View

Ed Ruscha
Artist Rooms

Through July 18, 2021
Tate Modern, London
www.tate.org.uk

This display reflects the range of Ed Ruscha’s practice, including paintings, prints, and photographic books, through artworks spanning sixty years of the artist’s career. Full of irony and humor, his works can often be interpreted as commentaries on American society.

Installation view, Ed Ruscha: Artist Rooms, Tate Modern, London, July 26, 2019–July 18, 2021. Artwork © Ed Ruscha. Photo © Tate (Oliver Cowling)

Willem de Kooning, Woman, 1953, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC © 2021 The Willem de Kooning Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

On View

Soutine / de Kooning
Conversations in Paint

Through August 8, 2021
Barnes Foundation, Philadelphia
www.barnesfoundation.org

Soutine / de Kooning: Conversations in Paint creates a visual dialogue and explores affinities between the work of Chaïm Soutine (1893–1943) and Willem de Kooning (1904–1997). The exhibition, which presents nearly forty-five works, considers how Soutine’s paintings, with their built-up surfaces and energetic brushwork, informed de Kooning’s art, shaping his figurative/abstract works in the late 1940s and beyond.

Willem de Kooning, Woman, 1953, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC © 2021 The Willem de Kooning Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Sarah Sze, Flash Point (Timekeeper), 2018 © Sarah Sze. Photo: Matteo D’Eletto, M3 Studio

On View

Sarah Sze in
Critical Zones

Through August 8, 2021
ZKM | Center for Art and Media, Karlsruhe, Germany
zkm.de

This exhibition invites visitors to engage with the critical situation of the earth in a novel and diverse way and to explore new modes of coexistence between all forms of life. In order to remedy the generally prevailing disorientation and dissension in society, politics, and ecology with regard to the changing state of the planet, the exhibition project sets up an imaginary cartography, considering the earth as a network of “critical zones.” Work by Sarah Sze is included.

Sarah Sze, Flash Point (Timekeeper), 2018 © Sarah Sze. Photo: Matteo D’Eletto, M3 Studio

Andreas Gursky, Kreuzfahrt, 2020 © Andreas Gursky/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2020

On View

Andreas Gursky

Through August 22, 2021
Museum der bildenden Künste, Leipzig, Germany
mdbk.de

For this highly personal retrospective—his first solo exhibition in the city of his birth—Andreas Gursky selected approximately eighty photographs, including around fifty extremely large-format compositions; older iconic works that have imprinted themselves on the visual memory, such as 99 Cent (1999); and new works that have yet to be exhibited in a museum.

Andreas Gursky, Kreuzfahrt, 2020 © Andreas Gursky/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2020

Photo: Daniel Limpi/EyeEm/Getty Images, courtesy Tank Shanghai

On View

Theaster Gates
Bad Neon

Through August 29, 2021
Tank Shanghai
tankshanghai.com

In his exhibition Bad Neon, Theaster Gates transforms the unique space of Tank Shanghai—which is housed within decommissioned aviation fuel tanks of a former airport—into a roller-skating rink, complete with neon lights, music, and artworks. Visitors are invited to experience the energy of Gates’s art on skates, including two iceberg-shaped sculptures, Houseberg (gold) and Houseberg (silver), which pay tribute to 1980s Chicago house music and clubs. Over the course of the exhibition, musicians and artists will craft different genres of music, introducing more possibilities to the site.

Photo: Daniel Limpi/EyeEm/Getty Images, courtesy Tank Shanghai

Theaster Gates, Monument in Waiting, 2020, installation view, Parrish Art Museum, Water Mill, New York © Theaster Gates. Photo: courtesy GRAY, Chicago/New York

On View

Field of Dreams

Through August 31, 2021
Parrish Art Museum, Water Mill, New York
parrishart.org

Field of Dreams activates the Parrish Art Museum’s expansive meadows with sculpture by ten international, multigenerational artists that engages and responds to the museum’s architecture and landscape. Created to extend the galleries outdoors, the exhibition series is part of the Parrish’s new Art in the Meadow initiative that enlivens its 14-acre grounds with artworks, performances, and projections. Work by Theaster Gates, Roy Lichtenstein, and Giuseppe Penone is included.

Theaster Gates, Monument in Waiting, 2020, installation view, Parrish Art Museum, Water Mill, New York © Theaster Gates. Photo: courtesy GRAY, Chicago/New York

Adriana Varejão, Ruína Modernista II, 2018 © Adriana Varejão. Photo: Eduardo Ortega

On View

Adriana Varejão in
Casa Carioca

Through August 2021
Museu de Arte do Rio, Rio de Janeiro
museudeartedorio.org.br

This exhibition, initially presented online due to the global health crisis, brings together approximately eight hundred works around themes related to the home and life in Rio de Janeiro and Brazil. It was conceived as part of the cultural program for the 27th World Congress of the International Union of Architects, which will be held in Brazil for the first time in July 2021. Work by Adriana Varejão is included.

Adriana Varejão, Ruína Modernista II, 2018 © Adriana Varejão. Photo: Eduardo Ortega

Vera Lutter, LACMA from the Bridge, III: April 3–5, 2017, 2017 © Vera Lutter

On View

Vera Lutter
Museum in the Camera

Through September 12, 2021
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
www.lacma.org

Between February 2017 and January 2019, Vera Lutter documented the Los Angeles County Museum of Art using a camera obscura, creating photographs that examine the museum’s exterior architecture, gallery interiors, and permanent collection. This exhibition features the photographs made during this two-year residency.

Vera Lutter, LACMA from the Bridge, III: April 3–5, 2017, 2017 © Vera Lutter

Helen Frankenthaler, Europa, 1957 © 2019 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

On View

Helen Frankenthaler

Through November 2021
Tate Modern, London
www.tate.org.uk

Tate Modern presents five works by Helen Frankenthaler, ranging in date from 1951 to 1977, on loan from the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, New York. The display marks the artist’s first extensive museum presentation in London since 1969.

Helen Frankenthaler, Europa, 1957 © 2019 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Shio Kusaka, (line 5), 2010 © Shio Kusaka

On View

Making Knowing
Craft in Art, 1950–2019

Closing February 2022
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
whitney.org

Making Knowing: Craft in Art, 1950–2019 foregrounds how visual artists have explored the materials, methods, and strategies of craft over the past seven decades. Some expand techniques with long histories, such as weaving, sewing, or pottery, while others experiment with clay, beads, and glass, among other mediums. Work by Richard Artschwager, Mike Kelley, Shio Kusaka, and Sterling Ruby is included.

Shio Kusaka, (line 5), 2010 © Shio Kusaka

Installation view, The Whitney’s Collection: Selections from 1900 to 1965, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, June 28, 2019–May 2022. Artwork, left to right: © 2020 The Jay DeFeo Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © Norman Lewis; © 2020 The Franz Kline Estate/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Ron Amstutz

On View

The Whitney’s Collection
Selections from 1900 to 1965

Through May 2022
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
whitney.org

This exhibition of more than 120 works, drawn entirely from the Whitney’s collection, is inspired by the founding history of the museum. The Whitney was established in 1930 by Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney to champion the work of living American artists. A sculptor and a patron, Whitney recognized both the importance of contemporary American art and the need to support the artists who made it. The collection she assembled foregrounds how artists uniquely reveal the complexity and beauty of American life. Work by Jay DeFeo, Willem de Kooning, Roy Lichtenstein, Man Ray, Ed Ruscha, Andy Warhol, and Tom Wesselmann is included.

Installation view, The Whitney’s Collection: Selections from 1900 to 1965, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, June 28, 2019–May 2022. Artwork, left to right: © 2020 The Jay DeFeo Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © Norman Lewis; © 2020 The Franz Kline Estate/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Ron Amstutz

Installation view, Touching the Void, Museum of Modern Art, New York, November 14, 2020–November 1, 2023. Artwork, left to right: © Archives Simon Hantaï/ADAGP, Paris, 2021; © Carlos Rojas; © 2021 Robert Ryman; © 2021 Fundación Gego; © Liliana Porter. Photo: Jonathan Muzikar

On View

Simon Hantaï in
Touching the Void

Through November 1, 2023
Museum of Modern Art, New York
www.moma.org

As part of New Art from Wall to Wall, the Museum of Modern Art is presenting never-before and rarely shown works in themed, reimagined collection galleries. The gallery Touching the Void explores an important artistic tendency of the 1960s: a shift away from the idea that art should express the artist’s interior life. Works in this vein searched for a poetics of bare form and focused on structural elements such as line, plane, and volume. Whether strict or playful, the work of these artists tested the meditative possibilities of objectivity, challenging viewers to heighten their sensory perception. Work by Simon Hantaï is included.

Installation view, Touching the Void, Museum of Modern Art, New York, November 14, 2020–November 1, 2023. Artwork, left to right: © Archives Simon Hantaï/ADAGP, Paris, 2021; © Carlos Rojas; © 2021 Robert Ryman; © 2021 Fundación Gego; © Liliana Porter. Photo: Jonathan Muzikar

Rachel Feinstein working at the Porzellan Manufaktur Nymphenburg, Munich, 2019. Artwork © Rachel Feinstein. Photo: Samuel Keyte, courtesy Gucci

On View

Rachel Feinstein

Through June 2024
Chatsworth House, Derbyshire, England
www.chatsworth.org

The Artist in Residence project is a program at Chatsworth House, in collaboration with Gucci, where the public is invited to discover an artist’s works while visiting the estate. Rachel Feinstein’s works create an open dialogue between the artist’s perspective and her environment, reflective of her research during her residency at Chatsworth.

Rachel Feinstein working at the Porzellan Manufaktur Nymphenburg, Munich, 2019. Artwork © Rachel Feinstein. Photo: Samuel Keyte, courtesy Gucci

Jia Aili, Untitled, 2011 © Jia Aili Studio. Photo: Yang Chao Studio

On View

Duration
Chinese Art in Transformation

Opened September 25, 2020
Minsheng Art Museum, Beijing
www.msam.cn

Duration: Chinese Art in Transformation attempts to show how every moment that stretches is an absorption of the past, and the endless possibilities of the future are based on the past and the present. The exhibition presents painting, sculpture, installation, video, animation, and more from the 1970s to the present. Work by Hao Liang, Jia Aili, and Zeng Fanzhi is included.

Jia Aili, Untitled, 2011 © Jia Aili Studio. Photo: Yang Chao Studio

Katharina Grosse, Ingres Wood Seven, 2017 © Katharina Grosse and VG Bild-Kunst Bonn, 2019 Photo: Jens Ziehe

On View

Katharina Grosse in
Collezione MAXXI. Lo spazio dell’immagine

Opened November 21, 2018
Museo nazionale delle arti del XXI secolo, Rome
www.maxxi.art

The spirit and the identity of the museum are being renewed with a display of more than thirty works by twenty-six artists. Dedicated to the museum’s new acquisitions, this group show aims to create a counterpoint between the abstract and the figurative. Work by Katharina Grosse is included.

Katharina Grosse, Ingres Wood Seven, 2017 © Katharina Grosse and VG Bild-Kunst Bonn, 2019 Photo: Jens Ziehe

Sally Mann, Deep South, Untitled (Emmett Till River Bank), 1998 © Sally Mann

On View

New Symphony of Time

Opened September 7, 2019
Mississippi Museum of Art, Jackson
www.msmuseumart.org

New Symphony of Time expands the boundaries of Mississippi’s identity, casting light on a shared past to help reflect an expansive, more inclusive future. The exhibition aims to explore personal and collective memory, history and the connection to place, and the roles artists play in pursuit of civil rights and racial equity through ancestry. Themes include migration, movement, and home; shared humanity; environment; and liberty. Work by Titus Kaphar and Sally Mann is included.

Sally Mann, Deep South, Untitled (Emmett Till River Bank), 1998 © Sally Mann

Ed Ruscha, Angry Because It’s Plaster, Not Milk, 1965 © Ed Ruscha

On View

Ed Ruscha

Opened November 1, 2018
The Broad, Los Angeles
www.thebroad.org

An installation of sixteen works by Ed Ruscha is presented at the Broad. The museum is temporarily closed due to the ongoing health crisis. 

Ed Ruscha, Angry Because It’s Plaster, Not Milk, 1965 © Ed Ruscha

Sarah Sze, Images in Translation, 2019 © Sarah Sze

On View

Sarah Sze in
Off the Wall

March 7–Fall 2021
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
www.sfmoma.org

Off the Wall features photography-based installations by five artists, including Sarah Sze, who have challenged the established notions of how a photograph should be displayed. Employing inventive approaches that stretch the boundaries of the medium, the exhibited works engage visitors in unconventional ways. Sze’s Images in Translation (2019) is an intricate installation of still and moving images that blurs the line between art and life, the virtual and the real.

Sarah Sze, Images in Translation, 2019 © Sarah Sze

Tatiana Trouvé, Desire Lines, 2015, installation view, Musée d’art contemporain du Val-de-Marne, Vitry-sur-Seine, France © Tatiana Trouvé, ADAGP Paris 2020. Photo: © MAC VAL

On View

Tatiana Trouvé in
Le vent se lève

Opened March 7, 2020
Musée d’art contemporain du Val-de-Marne, Vitry-sur-Seine, France
www.macval.fr

This exhibition, whose title translates to The Wind Is Rising, explores the relationships between humanity and the planet through paintings, photographs, films, and installations. Work by Tatiana Trouvé is included.

Tatiana Trouvé, Desire Lines, 2015, installation view, Musée d’art contemporain du Val-de-Marne, Vitry-sur-Seine, France © Tatiana Trouvé, ADAGP Paris 2020. Photo: © MAC VAL