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Installation view, Aesthetics: Collection of Qiao Zhibing, Tank Shanghai, March 19–October 11, 2021. Artwork, left: © Thomas Houseago; center and right: © Theaster Gates. Photo: courtesy Tank Shanghai

On View

Aesthetics
Collection of Qiao Zhibing

Through December 19, 2021
Tank Shanghai
www.tankshanghai.com

Qiao Zhibing, contemporary art collector and founder of Tank Shanghai, has selected works from his private collection by twelve Chinese and international contemporary artists for this exhibition, which explores the inspiration art brings to the public from a visual perspective. Work by Theaster Gates and Thomas Houseago is included.

Installation view, Aesthetics: Collection of Qiao Zhibing, Tank Shanghai, March 19–October 11, 2021. Artwork, left: © Thomas Houseago; center and right: © Theaster Gates. Photo: courtesy Tank Shanghai

Rick Lowe, Black Wall Street Journey, 2018–, installation view, Smart Museum of Art, University of Chicago, 2021 © Rick Lowe Studio. Photo: Michael Tropea

On View

Rick Lowe in
Toward Common Cause: Art, Social Change, and the MacArthur Fellows Program at 40

Through December 19, 2021
Various locations in Chicago
towardcommoncause.org

Organized by the Smart Museum of Art at the University of Chicago in collaboration with more than two dozen partner organizations across the city, Toward Common Cause is a multi-venue exhibition exploring the extent to which certain resources—air, land, water, and even culture—can be held in common. Raising questions about inclusion, exclusion, ownership, and rights of access, the exhibition considers art’s vital role in society as a call to vigilance, a way to bear witness, and a potential act of resistance. Presented on the fortieth anniversary of the MacArthur Fellows Program, Toward Common Cause employs the Fellows Program as an “intellectual commons” and features work by twenty-nine artists who have been named Fellows since the program’s founding in 1981, including Rick Lowe. For the exhibition, Lowe has created his first Chicago-based social sculpture, Black Wall Street Journey, a three-part citywide project that pays tribute to the building of Black wealth, using public art to tell stories from the journeys of Black communities in Chicago and beyond.

Rick Lowe, Black Wall Street Journey, 2018–, installation view, Smart Museum of Art, University of Chicago, 2021 © Rick Lowe Studio. Photo: Michael Tropea

Installation view, Urs Fischer, Bourse de Commerce, Paris, May 22–December 31, 2021. Artwork © Urs Fischer

On View

Urs Fischer

Through December 31, 2021
Bourse de Commerce, Paris
www.pinaultcollection.com

Urs Fischer’s Untitled (2011) is being presented in the rotunda of the newly renovated Bourse de Commerce. Fischer has reconceived the sculpture to suit the scale of the space, whose Belle Epoque architecture has been redesigned by architect Tadao Ando. The work consists of a group of larger-than-life candles—replicas of Giambologna’s sixteenth-century Mannerist masterpiece The Rape of the Sabine Women; Fischer’s longtime friend, artist Rudolf Stingel; and an assortment of chairs—that are lit and melt down over the course of the exhibition.

Installation view, Urs Fischer, Bourse de Commerce, Paris, May 22–December 31, 2021. Artwork © Urs Fischer

Ed Ruscha, No Son Open Book, 2003 © Ed Ruscha

On View

Portals

Through December 31, 2021
NEON, Athens
neon.org.gr

Portals brings together fifty-nine artists from twenty-seven countries in the newly renovated spaces of the former Public Tobacco Factory, now the Hellenic Parliament Library and Printing House. Inspired by writer Arundhati Roy’s conception of the COVID-19 pandemic as a “portal, a gateway between one world and the next,” the exhibition aims to investigate the new reality revealed through the prism of change and disruption. Work by Ed Ruscha and Adriana Varejão is included.

Ed Ruscha, No Son Open Book, 2003 © Ed Ruscha

Installation view, Rudolf Stingel, Bourse de Commerce, Paris, May 22–December 31, 2021. Artwork © Rudolf Stingel

On View

Rudolf Stingel

Through December 31, 2021
Bourse de Commerce, Paris
www.pinaultcollection.com

The Bourse de Commerce presents three portraits by Rudolf Stingel as part of its inaugural series of exhibitions. The first depicts art dealer Paula Cooper, an indefatigable pioneer and defender of the avant-garde; the second shows his friend Franz West; and the last portrays the German Expressionist painter Ernst Ludwig Kirchner dressed in a soldier’s uniform. Based on small-format photographs that the artist dramatically enlarges without erasing the graininess, blurring, or evidence of wear and tear, these images are faithfully transposed via Stingel’s meticulous painting.

Installation view, Rudolf Stingel, Bourse de Commerce, Paris, May 22–December 31, 2021. Artwork © Rudolf Stingel

Tatiana Trouvé, The Guardian, 2019, installation view, Bourse de Commerce, Pinault Collection, Paris © Tatiana Trouvé, ADAGP Paris 2021

On View

Tatiana Trouvé in
Oeuvres in situ

Through December 31, 2021
Bourse de Commerce, Pinault Collection, Paris
www.pinaultcollection.com

This inaugural exhibition at the Bourse de Commerce, whose title translates to In Situ Works, aims to highlight the relationship that artists can have with an exhibition space, as well as their relationship to a museum and its visitors. The works, which include eight sculptures from Tatiana Trouvé’s series The Guardian, are installed outside of the museographic framework in the venue’s thoroughfares and passageways, under the dome, and at the top of the Medici Column, surprising visitors.

Tatiana Trouvé, The Guardian, 2019, installation view, Bourse de Commerce, Pinault Collection, Paris © Tatiana Trouvé, ADAGP Paris 2021

Damien Hirst, Renewal Blossom, 2018 © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS 2021. Photo: Prudence Cuming Associates

On View

Damien Hirst
Cherry Blossoms

Through January 2, 2022
Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain, Paris
www.fondationcartier.com

Cherry Blossoms, Damien Hirst’s first museum exhibition in France, reinterprets the traditional subject of landscape painting with playful irony. In this series Hirst combines thick brushstrokes and elements of gestural painting, referencing Impressionism, Pointillism, and Action painting. The monumental canvases, which are entirely covered in dense bright colors, envelop the viewer in a vast floral landscape moving between figuration and abstraction.

Damien Hirst, Renewal Blossom, 2018 © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS 2021. Photo: Prudence Cuming Associates

Pablo Picasso, Le Baiser, 1969, Musée national Picasso–Paris © Succession Picasso 2021

On View

Picasso-Rodin

Through January 2, 2022
Musée national Picasso–Paris and Musée Rodin, Paris
www.museepicassoparis.fr

Held simultaneously at two Parisian institutions, this exhibition offers a unique encounter between the works of Pablo Picasso and Auguste Rodin, two artists whose formal inventions marked a decisive turning point in modern art. Picasso-Rodin highlights unexpected convergences in their creative processes and explores their common practice of working serially and their shared taste for experimentation and ever-changing forms.

Pablo Picasso, Le Baiser, 1969, Musée national Picasso–Paris © Succession Picasso 2021

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 2002 © Rudolf Stingel. Photo: Alessandro Zambianchi

On View

Hey! Did you know that art does not exist

Through January 7, 2022
Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Israel
www.tamuseum.org.il

This exhibition presents more than one hundred works from Sylvio Perlstein’s intensely personal collection, which traces artists and trends that have defined the avant-garde, complex, and experimental nature of twentieth-century art. Work by Jean-Michel BasquiatDuane HansonRoy LichtensteinMan RayBrice Marden, Ed RuschaRudolf Stingel, Cy Twombly, and Andy Warhol is included.

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 2002 © Rudolf Stingel. Photo: Alessandro Zambianchi

Ed Ruscha, Double Standard #36/40, 1969 © Ed Ruscha

On View

On the Edge
Los Angeles Art, 1970s–1990s, from the Joan and Jack Quinn Family Collection

Through January 8, 2022
Bakersfield Museum of Art, California
www.bmoa.org

This exhibition highlights 150 works from the collection of Joan and Jack Quinn, which was primarily amassed between the 1970s and the 1990s. Many of their holdings were collected directly from the artists and have never changed hands or been shown publicly. The artworks they were drawn to are defined by a spirit of nonconformity, a play of new materials, a celebration of light, and the “California cool” ethos. Work by Jean-Michel Basquiat, Frank Gehry, and Ed Ruscha is included.

Ed Ruscha, Double Standard #36/40, 1969 © Ed Ruscha

Georg Baselitz, Tête, 1993, Musee d’Art Moderne de Paris © Georg Baselitz. Photo: Jochen Littkemann

On View

Donation d’œuvres de Georg Baselitz

Through January 9, 2022
Musée d’Art Moderne de Paris
www.mam.paris.fr

Donation d’œuvres de Georg Baselitz displays six landmark paintings gifted by the artist to the Musée d’Art Moderne de Paris. Each donated work represents an essential stage within Baselitz’s forty-year career: the tree, which was the subject of his first upside-down image; a “remix” of his 1962–63 painting, Die große Nacht im Eimer (The Big Night Down the Drain); several heads, a favorite subject of the artist from the outset; and finally, a work from the series dedicated to Sigmund Freud.

Georg Baselitz, Tête, 1993, Musee d’Art Moderne de Paris © Georg Baselitz. Photo: Jochen Littkemann

Theaster Gates standing next to his sculpture Vessel #20 (2020). Artwork © Theaster Gates. Photo: Chris Strong

On View

Theaster Gates
A Clay Sermon

Through January 9, 2022
Whitechapel Gallery, London
www.whitechapelgallery.org

Surveying two decades of work by Theaster Gates, from his early hand-thrown pots to his large-scale Afro-Mingei sculptures, A Clay Sermon investigates the material and spiritual legacies of clay. Exploring craft, labor, performance, and racial identity, as well as clay’s role in ceremony, ritual, colonialism, and global trade, Gates has made a selection of historical ceramics from private and public collections to exhibit alongside his own work. The exhibition includes a new film by Gates, which takes the form of a sermon on clay, and his most recent body of work: large stoneware vessels installed on plinths of hand-milled wood and stone.

Theaster Gates standing next to his sculpture Vessel #20 (2020). Artwork © Theaster Gates. Photo: Chris Strong

Sarah Sze, Flash Point (Timekeeper), 2018 © Sarah Sze. Photo: Matteo D’Eletto, M3 Studio

On View

Sarah Sze in
Critical Zones

Through January 9, 2022
ZKM | Center for Art and Media, Karlsruhe, Germany
zkm.de

This exhibition invites visitors to engage with the critical situation of the earth in a novel and diverse way and to explore new modes of coexistence between all forms of life. In order to remedy the generally prevailing disorientation and dissension in society, politics, and ecology with regard to the changing state of the planet, the exhibition project sets up an imaginary cartography, considering the earth as a network of “critical zones.” Work by Sarah Sze is included.

Sarah Sze, Flash Point (Timekeeper), 2018 © Sarah Sze. Photo: Matteo D’Eletto, M3 Studio

Sarah Sze, Mirror with Landscape Leaning (Fragment Series), 2015, Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut © Sarah Sze

On View

Sarah Sze in
On the Basis of Art: 150 Years of Women at Yale

Through January 9, 2022
Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut
artgallery.yale.edu

On the Basis of Art celebrates the achievements of women artists who have graduated from Yale University. Presented on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of coeducation at Yale College and the 150th anniversary of the first women students at the University, who came to study at the Yale School of the Fine Arts when it opened in 1869—the exhibition features works drawn entirely from the Yale University Art Gallery’s collection. The exhibition title refers to a phrase in Title IX, the landmark 1972 US federal law declaring that no one in an education program receiving federal financial assistance could be discriminated against “on the basis of sex.” Work by Sarah Sze is included.

Sarah Sze, Mirror with Landscape Leaning (Fragment Series), 2015, Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut © Sarah Sze

Willem de Kooning, . . . Whose Name Was Writ in Water, 1975, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York © 2021 The Willem de Kooning Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

On View

Chaïm Soutine/Willem de Kooning, la peinture incarnée

Through January 10, 2022
Musée de l’Orangerie, Paris
www.musee-orangerie.fr

Chaïm Soutine/Willem de Kooning, la peinture incarnée explores affinities between the work of Chaïm Soutine (1893–1943) and Willem de Kooning (1904–1997). The exhibition, which places nearly forty-five works by the two artists in visual dialogue, considers how Soutine’s paintings, with their built-up surfaces and energetic brushwork, informed de Kooning’s art, shaping his figurative/abstract works in the late 1940s and beyond. This exhibition has traveled from the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia, where it had the title Soutine/de Kooning: Conversations in Paint.

Willem de Kooning, . . . Whose Name Was Writ in Water, 1975, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York © 2021 The Willem de Kooning Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Installation view, Alexander Calder: Modern from the Start, Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 14, 2021–January 15, 2022. Artwork © 2021 Calder Foundation, New York/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Robert Gerhardt © 2021 The Museum of Modern Art

On View

Alexander Calder
Modern from the Start

Through January 15, 2022
Museum of Modern Art, New York
www.moma.org

Alexander Calder reimagined sculpture as an experiment in space and motion, upending centuries-old notions that sculpture should be static, grounded, and dense by making artworks that often move freely and interact with their surroundings. Bringing together early wire and wood figures, works on paper, jewelry, mobiles in motion, and monumental abstract sculptures, the exhibition takes a deep dive into the full breadth of Calder’s career and inventiveness.

Installation view, Alexander Calder: Modern from the Start, Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 14, 2021–January 15, 2022. Artwork © 2021 Calder Foundation, New York/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Robert Gerhardt © 2021 The Museum of Modern Art

Y.Z. Kami, Black Dome, 2015 © Y.Z. Kami

On View

Y.Z. Kami in
Rebel, Jester, Mystic, Poet: Contemporary Persians

Through January 16, 2022
Asia Society, New York
asiasociety.org

Drawn from the Mohammed Afkhami Collection, Rebel, Jester, Mystic, Poet: Contemporary Persians presents works by more than twenty artists from Iran and its diaspora. Revising traditional aesthetics and probing subjects such as gender identity, war, peace, religion, and spirituality, the works, which date from 1998 to the present, are realized in a variety of mediums, from painting and sculpture to photography and video installation. Through open critique or subterfuge, humor, spirituality, and poetry, the artists overcome the restrictions and pressures that have affected Iranians in the past quarter century. This exhibition originated at the Aga Khan Museum in Toronto. Work by Y.Z. Kami is included.

Y.Z. Kami, Black Dome, 2015 © Y.Z. Kami

Installation view, Katharina Grosse: Chill Seeping from the Walls Gets between Us, Helsinki Art Museum, June 8, 2021–January 23, 2022. Artwork © Katharina Grosse and VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, Germany 2021. Photo: Hanna Kukorelli/HAM Helsinki Art Museum

On View

Katharina Grosse
Chill Seeping from the Walls Gets between Us

Through January 23, 2022
Helsinki Art Museum
www.hamhelsinki.fi

Katharina Grosse is taking over the main exhibition halls on the museum’s upper level with two new installations, one of which has been painted on-site. Focusing on painting as a process and intervention, she transforms the exhibition spaces into artworks engaging in an active correspondence with the architecture, where visitors become participants as they move through her boldly colored installations.

Installation view, Katharina Grosse: Chill Seeping from the Walls Gets between Us, Helsinki Art Museum, June 8, 2021–January 23, 2022. Artwork © Katharina Grosse and VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, Germany 2021. Photo: Hanna Kukorelli/HAM Helsinki Art Museum

Installation view, Andreas Gursky, Museum Küppersmühle für Moderne Kunst, Duisburg, Germany, September 9, 2021–January 30, 2022. Artwork © Andreas Gursky/VG-Bild-Kunst, Bonn, Germany 2021. Photo: Inga Barnick, Installationsansichten MKM, 2021

On View

Andreas Gursky

Through January 30, 2022
Museum Küppersmühle für Moderne Kunst, Duisburg, Germany
museum-kueppersmuehle.de

This monographic exhibition of Andreas Gursky’s work includes nearly sixty photographs spanning four decades, starting with early works from the Ruhr region in Germany, which Gursky often used as a setting during his studies with Bernd and Hilla Becher at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf. Also included are well-known iconographic images and large-format photographs that provide a comprehensive overview of the artist’s practice.

Installation view, Andreas Gursky, Museum Küppersmühle für Moderne Kunst, Duisburg, Germany, September 9, 2021–January 30, 2022. Artwork © Andreas Gursky/VG-Bild-Kunst, Bonn, Germany 2021. Photo: Inga Barnick, Installationsansichten MKM, 2021

Andy Warhol, Dolly Parton and Keith Haring, 1985 © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. Licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

On View

Andy Warhol
Photo Factory

Through January 31, 2022
Fotografiska, New York
www.fotografiska.com

Photo Factory presents some of Andy Warhol’s earliest photographic works, offering a glimpse into his experimentation with the medium and how it served as a catalyst for his early silkscreen paintings, commissioned portraits, and commercial work. The exhibition features Polaroids of celebrities, artists, and friends; lesser-seen unique gelatin silver prints; Polaroid collages; 16mm film Screen Tests from the mid-1960s; and stitched photographs from Warhol’s final exhibition in 1987.

Andy Warhol, Dolly Parton and Keith Haring, 1985 © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. Licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Shio Kusaka, (line 5), 2010 © Shio Kusaka

On View

Making Knowing
Craft in Art, 1950–2019

Closing February 2022
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
whitney.org

Making Knowing: Craft in Art, 1950–2019 foregrounds how visual artists have explored the materials, methods, and strategies of craft over the past seven decades. Some expand techniques with long histories, such as weaving, sewing, or pottery, while others experiment with clay, beads, and glass, among other mediums. Work by Richard Artschwager, Mike Kelley, Shio Kusaka, and Sterling Ruby is included.

Shio Kusaka, (line 5), 2010 © Shio Kusaka

Alexander Calder, Têtes et queue, 1965, installation view, Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin © 2021 Calder Foundation, New York/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Stephanie von Becker

On View

Alexander Calder
Minimal/Maximal

Through February 13, 2022
Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin
www.smb.museum

This exhibition traces the unique relationship between size, scale, and spatiality in Alexander Calder’s works, while juxtaposing his organic forms with the strict geometry of Mies van der Rohe’s building in a poetic dialogue. Calder’s outdoor sculpture Têtes et queue (1965), which was originally installed at the museum’s inauguration, now returns to its terrace.

Alexander Calder, Têtes et queue, 1965, installation view, Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin © 2021 Calder Foundation, New York/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Stephanie von Becker

Walter De Maria, The 2000 Sculpture, 1992 © Estate of Walter De Maria. Photo: Franca Candrian, Kunsthaus Zürich

On View

Walter De Maria
The 2000 Sculpture

Through February 20, 2022
Kunsthaus Zürich
www.kunsthaus.ch

Walter De Maria’s The 2000 Sculpture (1992) comprises a total of two thousand white plaster rods each 50 centimeters long and varying between 11.8 and 12 centimeters tall. The individual elements have five, seven, or nine sides. Following a specific rhythm, they are arranged on a surface covering 500 square meters, in a total of twenty rows each with one hundred rods. The result is a kind of herringbone pattern, with the rods seeming to move toward or away from the viewer, depending on where he or she stands. This creates a tension between predictable regularity and individual perception that is underscored by the light and space surrounding the arrangement.

Walter De Maria, The 2000 Sculpture, 1992 © Estate of Walter De Maria. Photo: Franca Candrian, Kunsthaus Zürich

Helen Frankenthaler, Untitled, 1967, Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Chiron Press, New York

On View

Without Limits
Helen Frankenthaler, Abstraction, and the Language of Print

Through February 20, 2022
Blanton Museum of Art, University of Texas at Austin
blantonmuseum.org

Without Limits celebrates the generous gift from the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation to the Blanton Museum of Art of ten prints and six proofs that span five decades of the artist’s career. Frankenthaler began creating prints in 1961, approaching lithography, screen printing, etching, and woodcut printing with curiosity and vision. Collaborating with master printmakers at studios such as Universal Limited Art Editions (ulae), Mixografia, and Tyler Graphics, Ltd., she contributed to a printmaking renaissance in the mid-twentieth century. Her work is presented alongside prints by other artists in the Blanton’s collection who also use the medium to capture and translate their own abstract visions.

Helen Frankenthaler, Untitled, 1967, Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Chiron Press, New York