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Installation view, ICP at 50: From the Collection, 1845–2019, International Center of Photography, New York, January 24–May 6, 2024. Artwork, left to right: © Nan Goldin, © Zanele Muholi, © Deana Lawson. Photo: Jeenah Moon, courtesy International Center of Photography

On View

ICP at 50
From the Collection, 1845–2019

Through May 6, 2024
International Center of Photography, New York
www.icp.org

ICP at 50 is a thematic exploration of the many processes that comprise the history of the photographic medium, drawn from the International Center of Photography’s holdings. The institution was established in 1974 and the exhibition offers insight into the breadth and depth of its collection which spans from the nineteenth century to the present day. Work by Richard Avedon, Nan Goldin, Deana Lawson, and Andy Warhol is included.

Installation view, ICP at 50: From the Collection, 1845–2019, International Center of Photography, New York, January 24–May 6, 2024. Artwork, left to right: © Nan Goldin, © Zanele Muholi, © Deana Lawson. Photo: Jeenah Moon, courtesy International Center of Photography

Installation view, When Forms Come Alive, Hayward Gallery, London, February 7–May 6, 2024. Artwork, left to right: © Nairy Baghramian; © Archiv Franz West, © Estate Franz West. Photo: Jo Underhill, courtesy Hayward Gallery

On View

Franz West in
When Forms Come Alive

Through May 6, 2024
Hayward Gallery, London
www.southbankcentre.co.uk

Spanning over sixty years of contemporary sculpture, When Forms Come Alive highlights ways in which artists draw on familiar experiences of movement, flux, and organic growth. Inspired by sources ranging from a dancer’s gesture to the breaking of a wave, from a flow of molten metal to the interlacing of a spider’s web, the works by twenty-one international artists conjure fluid and shifting realms of experience. Work by Franz West is included.

Installation view, When Forms Come Alive, Hayward Gallery, London, February 7–May 6, 2024. Artwork, left to right: © Nairy Baghramian; © Archiv Franz West, © Estate Franz West. Photo: Jo Underhill, courtesy Hayward Gallery

Amoako Boafo, Red Collar, 2021 © Amoako Boafo. Photo: Paul Salveson, courtesy the artist and Roberts Projects Los Angeles

On View

Some Dogs Go to Dallas

Through May 12, 2024
Green Family Art Foundation, Dallas
www.greenfamilyartfoundation.org

Some Dogs Go to Dallas presents a selection of works from the collection of Pamela and David Hornik. Ardent dog lovers, the Horniks have a penchant for acquiring pieces depicting canines across eras, locations, and techniques from throughout the art historical canon. The diversity of this collection underscores the universality of the human connection with animals and the profoundly enduring love that those bonds create. Work by Amoako Boafo and Andy Warhol is included.

Amoako Boafo, Red Collar, 2021 © Amoako Boafo. Photo: Paul Salveson, courtesy the artist and Roberts Projects Los Angeles

Lauren Halsey, Loda Land, 2020 © Lauren Halsey

On View

Multiplicity
Blackness in Contemporary American Collage

Through May 12, 2024
Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
www.mfah.org

Multiplicity presents over eighty major collage and collage-informed works by fifty-two living artists. The works reflect the breadth and complexity of Black identity, exploring diverse conceptual concerns such as cultural hybridity, notions of beauty, gender fluidity, and historical memory. From paper, photographs, fabric, and salvaged or repurposed materials, these artists create unified compositions that express the endless possibilities of Black-constructed narratives within our fragmented society. This exhibition originated at the Frist Art Museum, Nashville, Tennessee. Work by Derrick Adams, Lauren Halsey, and Rick Lowe is included.

Lauren Halsey, Loda Land, 2020 © Lauren Halsey

Installation view, Power Up: Imaginaires techniques et utopies sociales, Le Grand Café—Centre d’art contemporain, Saint-Nazaire, France, February 8–May 12, 2024. Artwork, left to right: © Mierle Laderman Ukeles, © Tatiana Trouvé, © Laura Lamiel. Photo: Marc Domage

On View

Tatiana Trouvé in
Power Up: Imaginaires techniques et utopies sociales

Through May 12, 2024
Le Grand Café—Centre d’art contemporain, Saint-Nazaire, France
www.grandcafe-saintnazaire.fr

This exhibition, whose subtitle translates to Technical Imaginaries and Social Utopias, considers energy infrastructures and their state of disrepair within the context of the global ecological crisis. Focusing on a female perspective, Power Up, which includes works by eighteen artists and architects, puts forward a new history of technology and suggests the need for a radical rethink in our approach to the world around us. Work by Tatiana Trouvé is included.

Installation view, Power Up: Imaginaires techniques et utopies sociales, Le Grand Café—Centre d’art contemporain, Saint-Nazaire, France, February 8–May 12, 2024. Artwork, left to right: © Mierle Laderman Ukeles, © Tatiana Trouvé, © Laura Lamiel. Photo: Marc Domage

Jim Shaw, Mnemonic Device #2, Third Stone from the Sun, 2020 © Jim Shaw

On View

Jim Shaw
The Ties That Bind

Through May 19, 2024
Museum of Contemporary Art Antwerp, Belgium
www.muhka.be

The Ties That Bind explores Jim Shaw’s work from the last five decades, which has at once anticipated and mirrored shifts in the American cultural and political landscape during this period. In recent decades, the artist’s work has increasingly highlighted the growing tension between conservative and progressive ideologies. The exhibition presents drawings, paintings, photographs, and immersive installations that bring to light the core motifs of Shaw’s practice.

Jim Shaw, Mnemonic Device #2, Third Stone from the Sun, 2020 © Jim Shaw

Installation view, Stanley Whitney: How High the Moon, Buffalo AKG Art Museum, New York, February 9–May 26, 2024. Artwork © Stanley Whitney. Photo: Brenda Bieger, Buffalo AKG Art Museum

On View

Stanley Whitney
How High the Moon

Through May 26, 2024
Buffalo AKG Art Museum, New York
buffaloakg.org

Conveying the breadth of Stanley Whitney’s practice from the early 1970s through today, this exhibition of artist’s paintings at the Buffalo AKG Art Museum, New York (formerly the Albright-Knox Art Gallery), also includes a robust installation of drawings, prints, and sketchbooks. The retrospective contextualizes Whitney’s practice in relation to his artistic community as well as his influences—from the history of art and architecture to quilting, textiles, and jazz.

Installation view, Stanley Whitney: How High the Moon, Buffalo AKG Art Museum, New York, February 9–May 26, 2024. Artwork © Stanley Whitney. Photo: Brenda Bieger, Buffalo AKG Art Museum

Sally Mann, Jessie #25, 2004 © Sally Mann

On View

Sally Mann in
Love Languages

Open from September 2, 2023
Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
www.mfah.org

Love Languages considers how the making of art is a type of love language all of its own. The installation attempts to address the question “How do we prioritize tenderness against debilitating social conditions?” The works on view engage with the necessity of intimacy in interpersonal and collective relationships. Work by Sally Mann is included.

Sally Mann, Jessie #25, 2004 © Sally Mann

Installation view, The Whitney’s Collection: Selections from 1900 to 1965, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, June 28, 2019–May 2022. Artwork, left to right: © 2020 The Jay DeFeo Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © Norman Lewis; © 2020 The Franz Kline Estate/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Ron Amstutz

On View

The Whitney’s Collection
Selections from 1900 to 1965

Opened June 28, 2019
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
whitney.org

This exhibition of more than 120 works, drawn entirely from the Whitney’s collection, is inspired by the founding history of the museum. The Whitney was established in 1930 by Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney to champion the work of living American artists. A sculptor and a patron, Whitney recognized both the importance of contemporary American art and the need to support the artists who made it. The collection she assembled foregrounds how artists uniquely reveal the complexity and beauty of American life. Work by Jay DeFeo, Willem de Kooning, Roy Lichtenstein, Man Ray, Ed Ruscha, Andy Warhol, and Tom Wesselmann is included.

Installation view, The Whitney’s Collection: Selections from 1900 to 1965, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, June 28, 2019–May 2022. Artwork, left to right: © 2020 The Jay DeFeo Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © Norman Lewis; © 2020 The Franz Kline Estate/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Ron Amstutz

Attributed to Ilyas Khan Bahadur, An Elephant and Keeper, c. 1650–60, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

On View

Indian Skies
The Howard Hodgkin Collection of Indian Court Painting

Through June 9, 2024
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
www.metmuseum.org

Over the course of sixty years, Howard Hodgkin formed a collection of Indian paintings and drawings that is recognized as one of the finest of its kind. The artist collected works from the Mughal, Deccani, Rajput, and Pahari courts dating from the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries. This exhibition presents over 120 of these works, many of which the Metropolitan Museum of Art recently acquired, alongside loans from the Howard Hodgkin Indian Collection Trust.

Attributed to Ilyas Khan Bahadur, An Elephant and Keeper, c. 1650–60, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

Chris Burden, Kunst Kick (3 photographs and text), 1974 (detail), The Warehouse, Dallas © 2024 Chris Burden/Licensed by the Chris Burden Estate and Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: courtesy Chris Burden Estate

On View

For What It’s Worth
Value Systems in Art since 1960

Through June 29, 2024
The Warehouse, Dallas
thewarehousedallas.org

Looking at global, conceptual art tendencies since 1960, For What It’s Worth focuses on artists who generate, question, and infect value systems through their work. These systems might address exchange, social structures, or philosophical intangibles, and many of the selected works share an exploration of the codification of values through language and patterns of behavior. Work by Chris Burden and Sterling Ruby is included.

Chris Burden, Kunst Kick (3 photographs and text), 1974 (detail), The Warehouse, Dallas © 2024 Chris Burden/Licensed by the Chris Burden Estate and Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: courtesy Chris Burden Estate

Derrick Adams, Woman in Grayscale (Alicia), 2017 © Derrick Adams Studio

On View

Giants
Art from the Dean Collection of Swizz Beatz and Alicia Keys

Through July 7, 2024
Brooklyn Museum, New York
www.brooklynmuseum.org

Giants, the first major exhibition of the Dean Collection, owned by musical icons Swizz Beatz (Kasseem Dean) and Alicia Keys, showcases a focused selection from the couple’s world-class holdings and spotlights works by Black diasporic artists. Expansive in their collecting habits, the Deans, both born and raised in New York, champion a philosophy of “artists supporting artists.” “Giants” refers to the renown of legendary artists, the impact of canon-expanding contemporary figures, and some of the monumental works in the collection. Work by Derrick Adams, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Titus Kaphar, and Deana Lawson is included.

Derrick Adams, Woman in Grayscale (Alicia), 2017 © Derrick Adams Studio

Jordan Wolfson, Body Sculpture, 2023 (detail), installation view, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra © Jordan Wolfson. Photo: National Gallery of Australia, Canberra

On View

Jordan Wolfson
Body Sculpture

Through July 28, 2024
National Gallery of Australia, Canberra
nga.gov.au

This exhibition is the first solo presentation of Jordan Wolfson’s work in Australia and features the world premiere of Body Sculpture (2023), a recent major acquisition by the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra. Body Sculpture is a new animatronic work that combines sculpture and performance to generate emotional and physical responses in the viewer. It will be shown alongside key works selected by the artist from the National Gallery’s collection, offering audiences further insights into Wolfson’s innovative vision.

Jordan Wolfson, Body Sculpture, 2023 (detail), installation view, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra © Jordan Wolfson. Photo: National Gallery of Australia, Canberra

Glenn Brown, On the Way to the Leisure Centre, 2017 © Glenn Brown

On View

Glenn Brown in
The Leisure Centre

Through August 3, 2024
Brown Collection, London
glenn-brown.co.uk

In The Leisure Centre Glenn Brown asks the question: “What is the point at which relaxation and non-functional activity allows the mind to freely wander, when we can indulge in activities or thoughts simply for the pure pleasure of doing so?” This exhibition shows work by Brown alongside artists from the Brown Collection—including Cornelis van Haarlem, Gaetano Gandolfi, and Jean-Baptiste Greuze, among others—inviting the viewer to become a flaneur, traveling through time and place around the rooms.

Glenn Brown, On the Way to the Leisure Centre, 2017 © Glenn Brown

Edmund de Waal, the burning now, 2023, installation view, CLAY Keramikmuseum Danmark, Middelfart, Denmark © Edmund de Waal

On View

Playing with Fire
Edmund de Waal and Axel Salto

Through August 11, 2024
CLAY Keramikmuseum Danmark, Middelfart, Denmark
claymuseum.dk

Playing with Fire is an exhibition of work by the acclaimed Danish ceramist Axel Salto (1889–1961), curated by Edmund de Waal. Considered one of the greatest masters of twentieth-century ceramic art, Salto is renowned for his highly individual and expressive stoneware inspired by organic forms. A significant number of Salto’s ceramic works from the collection of CLAY Keramikmuseum Danmark and the Tangen Collection at Kunstsilo in Kristiansand, Norway, are shown alongside lesser-known and previously unseen works on paper, illustrations, writings, and textiles. A major new installation by de Waal reflects on Salto’s enduring influence.

Edmund de Waal, the burning now, 2023, installation view, CLAY Keramikmuseum Danmark, Middelfart, Denmark © Edmund de Waal

Nam June Paik in Miami, c. 1990. Photo: Brian Smith

On View

Nam June Paik
The Miami Years

Through August 16, 2024
Bass Museum of Art, Miami Beach, Florida
thebass.org

Nam June Paik: The Miami Years explores the artist’s little-known connection to Miami Beach and the surrounding south Florida community. Organized around the Bass Museum’s recent acquisition of his TV Cello (2003), it examines the innovative ways Paik used communication and media technologies in his work. The exhibition also includes Notations, a series of installations and performances by three contemporary artists whose practices engage with and further Paik’s experimentations with technology.

Nam June Paik in Miami, c. 1990. Photo: Brian Smith

Sarah Sze, Images That Images Beget, 2023 (detail) © Sarah Sze

On View

Sarah Sze

Through August 18, 2024
Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas
www.nashersculpturecenter.org

Sarah Sze invites viewers into a progression of site-specific works across three gallery spaces. Integrating painting, sculpture, images, sound, and video with the surrounding architecture, Sze’s new installations create intimate systems that reference our rapidly changing world. The exhibition blurs the boundaries between making and showing, process and product, the digital and material, and questions how objects acquire their meaning.

Sarah Sze, Images That Images Beget, 2023 (detail) © Sarah Sze

Taryn Simon, Chapter XI, from the series A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters I–XVIII, 2008–11 © Taryn Simon

On View

Taryn Simon in
Don’t Forget to Call Your Mother

Through September 15, 2024
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
www.metmuseum.org

At a time when photographs are primarily shared and saved digitally, many artists are returning to the physicality of snapshots in albums or pictures in archives as sources of inspiration. Taking its title from a photograph by Maurizio Cattelan, the exhibition Don’t Forget to Call Your Mother brings together works in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, from the 1970s to today. The selected works reflect upon the complicated feelings of nostalgia and sentimentality evoked by these physical artifacts, while underlining the power of the found object. Work by Taryn Simon is included.

Taryn Simon, Chapter XI, from the series A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters I–XVIII, 2008–11 © Taryn Simon

Amoako Boafo, Hudson in a Baby Blue Suit, 2019 © Amoako Boafo

On View

Amoako Boafo in
Singular Views: 25 Artists

Through October 6, 2024
Rubell Museum, Washington, DC
rubellmuseum.org

Singular Views: 25 Artists is drawn entirely from the Rubell Museum’s collection and encompasses over 120 artworks in a range of mediums. The exhibition features solo presentations of twenty-five artists from across the United States and around the world. Work by Amoako Boafo is included.

Amoako Boafo, Hudson in a Baby Blue Suit, 2019 © Amoako Boafo

Derrick Adams, Floater 101, 2020 © Derrick Adams Studio

On View

Derrick Adams in
Kindred Worlds: The Priscila and Alvin Hudgins Collection

Through March 2, 2025
Hudson River Museum, Yonkers, New York
www.hrm.org

Drawn from the private collection of Priscila and Alvin Hudgins III, Kindred Worlds reveals the couple’s deep and enduring devotion to the arts. For the Hudginses, collecting was a way of building home and community. Their artworks, many of which include images of family members, demonstrate a dynamic network of relationships between collector and artist, artist and subject, and subject and kin. Work by Derrick Adams is included.

Derrick Adams, Floater 101, 2020 © Derrick Adams Studio

Hao Liang, Eight Views of Xiaoxiang—Snowscape, 2014–15 © Hao Liang. Photo: courtesy UCCA Center for Contemporary Art, Beijing

On View

Duration
Chinese Art in Transformation

Opened September 25, 2020
Minsheng Art Museum, Beijing
www.msam.cn

Duration: Chinese Art in Transformation attempts to show how every moment that stretches is an absorption of the past, and the endless possibilities of the future are based on the past and the present. The exhibition presents painting, sculpture, installation, video, animation, and more from the 1970s to the present. Work by Hao Liang, Jia Aili, and Zeng Fanzhi is included.

Hao Liang, Eight Views of Xiaoxiang—Snowscape, 2014–15 © Hao Liang. Photo: courtesy UCCA Center for Contemporary Art, Beijing

Katharina Grosse, Ingres Wood Seven, 2017 © Katharina Grosse and VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, Germany 2019 Photo: Jens Ziehe

On View

Katharina Grosse in
Collezione MAXXI. Lo spazio dell’immagine

Opened November 21, 2018
Museo nazionale delle arti del XXI secolo, Rome
www.maxxi.art

The spirit and the identity of the museum are being renewed with a display of more than thirty works by twenty-six artists. Dedicated to the museum’s new acquisitions, this group show aims to create a counterpoint between the abstract and the figurative. Work by Katharina Grosse is included.

Katharina Grosse, Ingres Wood Seven, 2017 © Katharina Grosse and VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, Germany 2019 Photo: Jens Ziehe

Sally Mann, Deep South, Untitled (Emmett Till River Bank), 1998 © Sally Mann

On View

New Symphony of Time

Opened September 7, 2019
Mississippi Museum of Art, Jackson
www.msmuseumart.org

New Symphony of Time expands the boundaries of Mississippi’s identity, casting light on a shared past to help reflect an expansive, more inclusive future. The exhibition aims to explore personal and collective memory, history and the connection to place, and the roles artists play in pursuit of civil rights and racial equity through ancestry. Themes include migration, movement, and home; shared humanity; environment; and liberty. Work by Titus Kaphar and Sally Mann is included.

Sally Mann, Deep South, Untitled (Emmett Till River Bank), 1998 © Sally Mann

Francesca Woodman, Untitled, Providence, Rhode Island, 1975–78 © Woodman Family Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Opening Soon

Francesca Woodman and Julia Margaret Cameron
Portraits to Dream In

March 21–June 30, 2024
National Portrait Gallery, London
www.npg.org.uk

Photographers Francesca Woodman (1958–1981) and Julia Margaret Cameron (1815–1879) lived a century apart—Cameron working in the United Kingdom and Sri Lanka from the 1860s onwards, and Woodman in the United States and Italy from the 1970s. Both women explored portraiture, going beyond its ability to record appearance, and using their own creativity and imagination to suggest notions of beauty, symbolism, transformation, and storytelling. Showcasing more than 150 rare vintage prints, this exhibition presents an overview of both artists’ careers, and suggests new ways both to look at their work and to examine how photographic portraiture was created in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Francesca Woodman, Untitled, Providence, Rhode Island, 1975–78 © Woodman Family Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York