Menu

News / Museum Exhibitions

Closed

William Forsythe

February 5–December 1, 2019
Museum Folkwang, Essen, Germany
www.museum-folkwang.de

William Forsythe is presenting four exhibitions at the Museum Folkwang over the course of 2019. The first project is the interactive video work City of Abstracts (2000), which is installed in the museum’s foyer from February until the end of May. As visitors approach the piece their images are projected onto a screen, inviting interaction as their bodies are melded into a dance of stretched and spiraled forms. The second project is Human Writes Drawings, on view for the month of June, which shows Forsythe succeeding in transferring his choreographic exploration of human rights into the genre of drawing. The third, Aviariation, on view in one of the museum’s courtyards starting June 29, sets the branches of trees planted there swaying, the leaves rustling. Besides engaging viewers, the movements have an effect on the local bird population—as the title suggests. In November, Forsythe presents the fourth and final part, Acquisition/Körperschaft, a work, featuring two dancers, that is at once performative and participatory, and that he is adapting specially for Museum Folkwang.

William Forsythe, City of Abstracts, 2000, installation view, MMK Museum für Moderne Kunst, Frankfurt, Germany © William Forsythe

William Forsythe, City of Abstracts, 2000, installation view, MMK Museum für Moderne Kunst, Frankfurt, Germany © William Forsythe

Marta Kuzma, Eileen Costello, and Caitlin Murray in conversation surrounded by Donald Judd paintings.

In Conversation
Eileen Costello, Marta Kuzma, and Caitlin Murray on Donald Judd: Paintings

Art historian Eileen Costello and Yale School of Art professor Marta Kuzma discuss Donald Judd’s two-dimensional work and how the lessons he learned from the innovations of Abstract Expressionist and Color Field paintings permeate his entire body of work. Their conversation is moderated by Caitlin Murray, director of archives and programs at Judd Foundation.

Cover of Gagosian Quarterly with Jasper Johns’s Target with Four Faces (1955)

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Winter 2021

The Winter 2021 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring Jasper Johns’s Target with Four Faces (1955) on its cover.

Still from "Sally Mann: Vinculum".

Sally Mann: Vinculum

Join Sally Mann at her studio in Lexington, Virginia. Filmed at work in her darkroom and within the surrounding landscape, she discusses her exploratory approach to making and printing pictures, what draws her to the landscape of the American South, and her newest body of work, Vinculum.

Manuel Mathieu, Siblings 2, 2021, mixed media, 70 × 62 inches (117.8 × 157.5 cm)

Social Works II: Manuel Mathieu | The Delusion of Power

Artist Manuel Mathieu reflects on Haiti, Francisco Goya, and conceptualizations of power, examining their roles in his practice.

Still from video, featuring artwork by Jonas Wood

Behind the Art
Jonas Wood in Hong Kong

Join Jonas Wood on a virtual tour through the creation of his first solo exhibition in Hong Kong. Wood narrates the genesis and development of the new paintings, drawings, and wallpaper.

Martha Buskirk and Peter Ballantine speaking with one another

In Conversation
Peter Ballantine and Martha Buskirk on Donald Judd

Peter Ballantine, Donald Judd’s longtime fabricator of plywood works, and Martha Buskirk, professor of art history and criticism at Montserrat College of Art in Beverly, Massachusetts, discuss the development, production, and history of the largest plywood construction Judd ever made, an untitled work from 1980.

Ugo Mulas, Jasper Johns, 1964, vintage gelatin silver print, 9 ⅞ × 14 ½ inches (25 × 37 cm), Ugo Mulas Archive, Milan © Ugo Mulas Heirs

Jasper Johns: Mind/Mirror

Carlos Basualdo, the Keith L. and Katherine Sachs Senior Curator of Contemporary Art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and Scott Rothkopf, Senior Deputy Director and Nancy and Steve Crown Family Chief Curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, spoke with the Quarterly’s Alison McDonald ahead of the opening of the unprecedented collaborative retrospective Jasper Johns: Mind/Mirror to discuss the goals, revelations, and unique structure of the project.

Issy Wood, The down payment, 2021, oil on linen.

Picture Books: Ottessa Moshfegh and Issy Wood

Emma Cline introduces her new publication project, Picture Books, with a conversation between author Ottessa Moshfegh and artist Issy Wood.

Jenny Saville, Pietà I, 2019–21, charcoal and pastel on canvas

Jenny Saville: A cyclical rhythm of emergent forms

An exhibition curated by Sergio Risaliti, director of the Museo Novecento, Florence, pairs artworks by Jenny Saville with artists of the Italian Renaissance. On view across that city at the Museo Novecento, the Museo di Palazzo Vecchio, the Museo dell’Opera del Duomo, the Museo degli Innocenti, and the Museo di Casa Buonarroti through February 20, 2022, the presentation features paintings and drawings by Saville from the 1990s through to work made especially for the occasion. Here, Risaliti reflects on the resonances and reverberations brought about by these pairings.

Installation view, Semiotext(e) exhibition at the 2014 Whitney Biennial

Leaders in the Arts: Publishing Edition

Chris Kraus and Hedi El Kholti, coeditors of the legendary press Semiotext(e), speak with Kandis Williams, the founder and editor of Cassandra Press, and Lisa Pearson, the founder and editor of Siglio Press.

Rendering for Prompts for a City: Whitechapel, minaret/pew and podium/market table (2021), Sumayya Vally’s project for Social Works II. Image: Sumayya Vally, Counterspace

Social Works II: Sumayya Vally and Sir David Adjaye

Sumayya Vally speaks with Sir David Adjaye about rethinking and expanding the definition of architecture. The conversation forms part of “Social Works II,” a supplement guest edited by Antwaun Sargent for the Winter 2021 issue of the Quarterly.

Cy Twombly, Untitled (Say Goodbye, Catallus, to the Shores of Asia Minor), 1994, oil, acrylic, oil stick, crayon, and graphite on three canvases,

Say Goodbye, Catullus, to the Shores of Asia Minor

Thierry Greub tracks the literary references in Cy Twomblys epic painting of 1994.