Menu

GAGOSIAN

1
2
3
4
5
6
Tatiana Trouvé in her Paris studio.

Behind the Art
Tatiana Trouvé: In the Studio

Join the artist in her studio as she speaks about her new series of drawings, From March to May. Trouvé describes the genesis of the project and the essential role its creation played in keeping her connected with the outside world during the difficult months of pandemic-related lockdown.

Damien Hirst's Reclining Woman on the cover of Gagosian Quarterly, Fall 2021

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Fall 2021

The Fall 2021 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring Damien Hirst’s Reclining Woman (2011) on its cover.

Kon Trubkovich in his studio, Brooklyn, New York, 2021.

Kon Trubkovich

Historian Victoria Phillips speaks with the artist about his new paintings, memory and its relationship to media, and the continuing impact of the Cold War.

Installation view of Urs Fischer’s Untitled (2011) in the exhibition Ouverture, Bourse de Commerce – Pinault Collection, Paris, 2021. Artwork © Urs Fischer, courtesy Galerie Eva Presenhuber, Zurich; Bourse de Commerce – Pinault Collection © Tadao Ando Architect & Associates, Niney et Marca Architectes, Agence Pierre-Antoine Gatier. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Bourse de Commerce

William Middleton traces the development of the new institution, examining the collaboration between the collector François Pinault and the architect Tadao Ando in revitalizing the historic space. Middleton also speaks with artists Tatiana Trouvé and Albert Oehlen about Pinault’s passion as a collector, and with the Bouroullec brothers, who created design features for the interiors and exteriors of the museum.

Anna Halprin in The Prophetess, 1955.

Game Changer
Anna Halprin

Jacquelynn Baas celebrates the choreographer, dancer, and teacher, tracing the profound influence she had on the worlds of dance and art.

Kevin Jerome Everson, 2019. Photo: © Erin Leland

Overtime: On Kevin Jerome Everson

Carlos Valladares writes on the filmmaker’s expansive body of work, exploring themes of identity, time, and reality.

Left: Nancy Rubins. Photo: Joel Searles. Right: Eric Shiner. Photo: Walker Olesen

In Conversation
Nancy Rubins and Eric Shiner

The pair discuss Nancy Rubins’s unique approach to sculpture, in which industrial and found objects—such as television sets, airplane parts, and carousel animals—are transformed into engineered abstractions that are at once otherworldly and familiar.

Andreas Gursky, Jonathan Ive, 2019, fine art print mounted on dibond, 64 1/2 × 50 ⅝ inches (163.7 × 128.5 cm). National Portrait Gallery, London, commissioned; made possible by the Outset Commission, supported by Scott Collins in partnership with Outset Contemporary Art Fund, 2019 © Andreas Gursky/VG BILD-KUNST, Bonn

Ive by Gursky: A Meeting of Minds

By exploring the conventions of past portraits of industrial designers and architects, Maria Morris Hambourg unpacks Andreas Gursky’s ingenious recent portrait of Apple designer Jony Ive to reveal its layered meanings.

Gregory Corso, New York, 1986. Photo: Allen Ginsberg

Gregory Corso: A Most Dangerous Art

On the occasion of the forthcoming publication of The Golden Dot: Last Poems by Gregory Corso, Raymond Foye reflects on the poet’s enduring engagement with the human condition and explores the unique structure of this final collection.

John Currin, Memorial, 2020 (detail), oil on canvas, 62 × 40 inches (157.5 × 101.6 cm)

John Currin: Monuments to Lust

Natasha Stagg reports on a trip to John Currin’s New York studio.

Stella McCartney. Photo: Dougal MacArthur

Fashion and Art: Stella McCartney

The fashion designer Stella McCartney is best known for pioneering “vegan style,” a term referring to the animal-product-free designs of her luxury label. Derek Blasberg spoke to her about a childhood surrounded by artists such as Frank Stella and Willem de Kooning, and how their inspiration continues to influence her design process.

Kim Jones. Photo: Nikolai von Bismarck

Fashion and Art: Kim Jones

Kim Jones’s day job is as a fashion designer. He’s the artistic director of Dior men’s collection and the womenswear designer at Fendi, but his longtime hobby has been collecting: paintings, fashion memorabilia, books for two libraries (one at home in London and one at home in Paris). Derek Blasberg spoke with the designer about his process and his passions.

Urs Fischer, Better Halves Bitter Ends, 2020 © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Art Fair

Art Basel 2021

September 24–26, 2021, hall 2, booth C8
Messe Basel
artbasel.com

Gagosian is pleased to participate in Art Basel 2021 with modern and contemporary works by gallery artists, as well as several special entries in the Unlimited and Parcours sectors of the fair.

Gagosian’s booth in the main sector of the fair will feature works by Georg Baselitz, Glenn Brown, John Currin, Urs Fischer, Helen Frankenthaler, Titus Kaphar, Albert Oehlen, Sterling Ruby, and Mary Weatherford, among others. A selection of these works will also appear on gagosian.com and on Art Basel’s Online Viewing Room.

To receive a pdf with detailed information on the works, please contact the gallery at inquire@gagosian.com. To attend the fair, purchase tickets at artbasel.com.

Urs Fischer, Better Halves Bitter Ends, 2020 © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Rendering of Sarah Sze’s Timepiece (2021). Artwork © Sarah Sze

Art Fair

Art Basel Parcours 2021
Sarah Sze

September 20–26, 2021, 7pm–1am daily
Rheinsprung 9, Basel

Sarah Sze’s first large-scale outdoor video work will be a key feature of this year’s Art Basel Parcours, which engages the public and fairgoers by placing site-specific sculptures, interventions, and performances in the city’s historic center.

Timepiece (2021) by night transforms the facade of a four-story building at the top of the historic Rheinsprung into a plume of images seemingly let loose from their frame. A multitude of randomly coded video sequences—a moon, a card trick, an electrical storm, and more—appears at dusk, rising, pixelating, glitching, and eventually dispersing.

Rendering of Sarah Sze’s Timepiece (2021). Artwork © Sarah Sze

Alexander Calder, Flying Dragon, 1975 © 2021 Calder Foundation, New York/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Darren James Photography

Public Installation

Alexander Calder
Flying Dragon, 1975

Opening October 19, 2021
Place Vendôme, Paris

Alexander Calder’s monumental sculpture Flying Dragon (1975) will be on view at Place Vendôme in Paris beginning October 19. The installation marks the opening of Gagosian’s new gallery at rue de Castiglione and is part of FIAC Hors les Murs, which presents artworks in emblematic public spaces throughout the city.

Flying Dragon (1975)—which exemplifies Calder’s capacity to invest a powerful visual dynamism in his work regardless of scale—is among the last of the monumental works he made. While static, the striking sculpture transforms when viewed from different angles. Constructed from sheet metal, it is physically weighty but appears delicate due to its limited points of contact with the ground.

Alexander Calder, Flying Dragon, 1975 © 2021 Calder Foundation, New York/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Darren James Photography

See all Events & Announcements

Museum Exhibitions

Installation view, Taryn Simon: The Color of a Flea’s Eye: The Picture Collection, New York Public Library, 2020. Artwork © Taryn Simon. Photo: Rob McKeever

Opening this Week

Taryn Simon
The Color of a Flea’s Eye: The Picture Collection

September 23, 2021–January 9, 2022
New York Public Library
www.nypl.org

A project nine years in the making, The Color of a Flea’s Eye foregrounds the New York Public Library’s Picture Collection, whose storied images have been available, for more than a century, for the public to sift through in search of visual references of every conceivable kind. Intrigued by the Picture Collection since childhood, in 2012 Taryn Simon embarked on a study of its underlying patterns, codes, and orders. Her photography of its contents reveals it to be an inadvertent recorder of changing social mores, disclosing latent fault lines of power, race, and gender.

Installation view, Taryn Simon: The Color of a Flea’s Eye: The Picture Collection, New York Public Library, 2020. Artwork © Taryn Simon. Photo: Rob McKeever

Walter De Maria, Untitled [Desert Walk], c. 1961, Menil Collection, Houston © Estate of Walter De Maria. Photo: Paul Hester

Closing this Week

Dream Monuments
Drawing in the 1960s and 1970s

Through September 19, 2021
Menil Collection, Houston
www.menil.org

This exhibition presents drawings that challenge the conventional idea of the monument as a permanent, grand, or commemorative form. The provisional character of drawing helped artists envision forms in improbable scales and for impossible conditions, radically transforming the monument to reflect a new set of sensibilities. Scaled to the size of the page but enormous in ambition, these works rethink history while rendering environments as at turns absurd, surreal, or subjective. Work by Walter De Maria and Michael Heizer is included.

Walter De Maria, Untitled [Desert Walk], c. 1961, Menil Collection, Houston © Estate of Walter De Maria. Photo: Paul Hester

Georg Baselitz, B. für Larry (Remix), 2006 © Georg Baselitz

Closing this Week

Wonderland

Through September 19, 2021
Albertina Modern, Vienna
www.albertina.at

Inspired by Lewis Carroll’s 1865 novel Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, this exhibition features more than a hundred contemporary artworks from the Albertina’s collection organized into seven different “chapters” conceived as independent yet loosely connected “worlds.”  Work by Georg Baselitz, Katharina Grosse, Anselm Kiefer, Roy Lichtenstein, Albert Oehlen, Andy Warhol, and Franz West is included.

Georg Baselitz, B. für Larry (Remix), 2006 © Georg Baselitz

Gregory Crewdson, Back Lot, 2018–19 © Gregory Crewdson

Closing this Week

Road Rage

Through September 20, 2021
The Church, Sag Harbor, New York
www.sagharborchurch.org

Road Rage brings together works by twenty-four artists who use the car as subject or material. Dating from the 1960s to the present, the paintings, photographs, sculptures, drawings, and animated film on display consider automobiles as tools of travel, consumption, and commerce, and as icons of wealth, class, leisure, power, destruction, and pollution. Work by Gregory Crewdson and Richard Prince is included.

Gregory Crewdson, Back Lot, 2018–19 © Gregory Crewdson

See all Museum Exhibitions