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Alexander Calder, Flying Dragon, 1975 © 2021 Calder Foundation, New York/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Darren James Photography

Public Installation

Alexander Calder
Flying Dragon, 1975

Opening October 19, 2021
Place Vendôme, Paris

Alexander Calder’s monumental sculpture Flying Dragon (1975) will be on view at Place Vendôme in Paris beginning October 19. The installation marks the opening of Gagosian’s new gallery at rue de Castiglione and is part of FIAC Hors les Murs, which presents artworks in emblematic public spaces throughout the city.

Flying Dragon (1975)—which exemplifies Calder’s capacity to invest a powerful visual dynamism in his work regardless of scale—is among the last of the monumental works he made. While static, the striking sculpture transforms when viewed from different angles. Constructed from sheet metal, it is physically weighty but appears delicate due to its limited points of contact with the ground.

Alexander Calder, Flying Dragon, 1975 © 2021 Calder Foundation, New York/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Darren James Photography

Titus Kaphar. Photo: Sasha Arutyunova

In Conversation

at home: Symposium
Titus Kaphar, Arthur Lewis, and Hau Nguyen

Friday, September 17, 2021, 12pm EDT

Titus Kaphar will be in conversation with art collectors Arthur Lewis and Hau Nguyen as part of the at home: Symposium at the Yale Center for British Art in New Haven, Connecticut. The trio will discuss Kaphar’s practice and the importance of supporting emerging artists, artists of color, and local art communities. The talk will be moderated by Abigail Lamphier, senior curatorial assistant at the Center. Focusing on “The Politics of the Portrait,” the three-part online symposium considers potential solutions and alternatives regarding the history, display, and making of portraits and the role of representation in today’s sociopolitical climate. To attend the online event, register at yale.zoom.us.

Titus Kaphar. Photo: Sasha Arutyunova

Rachel Whiteread

In Conversation

Rachel Whiteread
Ann Gallagher

Wednesday, September 22, 2021, 1pm
Messe Basel
artbasel.com

As part of Art Basel’s Conversation series, Rachel Whiteread will participate in a Premiere Artists Talk with Ann Gallagher, former director of Tate’s collection of British art and editor of the forthcoming catalogue raisonné of the artist’s sculpture, about key moments in her career and what drives her work today. The conversation will be introduced by Marc Spiegler, global director of Art Basel.

Rachel Whiteread

Installation view, Guy Goodwin: Mattress World, Milton Resnick and Pat Passlof Foundation, New York, May 1–October 23, 2021. Artwork © Guy Goodwin

In Conversation

New Social Environment
Mattress World: Guy Goodwin and David Reed

Tuesday, September 14, 2021, 1pm EDT

As part of the Brooklyn Rail’s online series New Social Environment, David Reed and fellow artist Guy Goodwin join the journal’s editor-at-large Charlotte Kent for a conversation about Goodwin’s current exhibition, curated by Reed. In these daily lunchtime Zoom conversations, invited artists, writers, filmmakers, and poets discuss creative life in the context of our new social reality with Brooklyn Rail staff, followed by a question-and-answer session. The talk will conclude with a poetry reading by Andrea Abi-Karam. To attend the online event, register at brooklynrail.org.

Installation view, Guy Goodwin: Mattress World, Milton Resnick and Pat Passlof Foundation, New York, May 1–October 23, 2021. Artwork © Guy Goodwin

Auguste Rodin, Monument à Whistler – Muse nue, bras coupés (Monument to Whistler – Nude Muse, without Arms), 1908, installation view, Berkeley Square, London

Public Installation

Auguste Rodin
Monument à Whistler – Muse nue, bras coupés

September 7, 2021–March 2022
Berkeley Square, London

Auguste Rodin’s Monument à Whistler – Muse nue, bras coupés (Monument to Whistler – Nude Muse, without Arms) (1908) has been installed in Berkeley Square, London, in conjunction with the exhibition Houseago | Rodin, on view at Gagosian, Davies Street, London, through December 18. Rodin was commissioned to make a monument dedicated to the artist James Abbott McNeill Whistler. Though it was never realized publicly, the monument marks a watershed moment in civic sculpture due to its representation not of the artist himself but of a female muse. The sculpture, in the form of a female figure shown climbing the “mountain of fame,” references the difficulties Whistler overcame in his life.

Auguste Rodin, Monument à Whistler – Muse nue, bras coupés (Monument to Whistler – Nude Muse, without Arms), 1908, installation view, Berkeley Square, London

Left: Katy Hessel. Photo: Luke Fullalove. Middle: Matthew Holman. Right: Eleanor Nairne. Photo: Max Colson

In Conversation

Katy Hessel, Matthew Holman, and Eleanor Nairne on Helen Frankenthaler

Wednesday, September 8, 2021, 1pm edt (6pm bst)

Join Gagosian for an online conversation between broadcaster and art historian Katy Hessel; Matthew Holman, associate lecturer in English at University College London; and Eleanor Nairne, curator at the Barbican Art Gallery, London, about the exhibition Imagining Landscapes: Paintings by Helen Frankenthaler, 1952–1976, on view at Gagosian, Grosvenor Hill, London, through September 18. The trio will discuss Frankenthaler’s early training, the development of her signature soak-stain technique and subsequent shifts in style, and her connections to the London art world. To join, register at eventbrite.com.

Left: Katy Hessel. Photo: Luke Fullalove. Middle: Matthew Holman. Right: Eleanor Nairne. Photo: Max Colson

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Announcements

The exterior of Gagosian’s new gallery at 9 rue de Castiglione, Paris. Photo: Thomas Lannes

Gagosian Announces New Paris Gallery

Gagosian is pleased to announce the opening of a new location in Paris in October 2021. Situated at 9 rue de Castiglione, in the 1st arrondissement, the space is part of the historic Hotel Lotti development, built in 1910. The location is steps from Place Vendôme, where Leo Castelli and René Drouin opened the storied Drouin Gallery in 1939, and within walking distance of the Musée du Louvre, Musée de l’Orangerie, and Musée d’Orsay.

The exterior of Gagosian’s new gallery at 9 rue de Castiglione, Paris. Photo: Thomas Lannes

Georg Baselitz, La tête d’Abgar, 1984, Musee d’Art Moderne de Paris © Georg Baselitz. Photo: Jochen Littkemann

Donation

Georg Baselitz
Musée d’Art Moderne de Paris

Georg Baselitz has donated six paintings to the Musee d’Art Moderne de Paris, which are now on view in the special exhibition Donation d’œuvres de Georg Baselitz, through January 9, 2022. The gift testifies to the museum’s ongoing relationship with the artist since his retrospective there in 1997, followed by his sculpture exhibition in 2011.

Georg Baselitz, La tête d’Abgar, 1984, Musee d’Art Moderne de Paris © Georg Baselitz. Photo: Jochen Littkemann

Helen Frankenthaler, Cool Summer, 1962 © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Rob McKeever

Support

Frankenthaler Climate Initiative

Building on the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation’s social impact philanthropy, the Frankenthaler Climate Initiative is a multiyear grant-making program designed to advance the goal of carbon neutrality in the visual arts. In its inaugural cycle, the Foundation conferred its full initial commitment of more than $5 million to assist nearly eighty collecting institutions across more than twenty-five states in improving their energy efficiency. It has also dedicated an additional $5 million to be awarded over the next two years. For more information and a full list of 2021 grantees, visit frankenthalerclimateinitiative.org.

Helen Frankenthaler, Cool Summer, 1962 © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Rob McKeever

Carsten Höller, Seven Sliding Doors Corridor (Outdoor Version), 2021, installation view, Luma Arles, France © Carsten Höller. Photo: Adrian Deweerdt

Permanent Installation

Carsten Höller
Seven Sliding Doors Corridor (Outdoor Version)

Carsten Höller’s installation Seven Sliding Doors Corridor (Outdoor Version), recently installed at Luma Arles, France, consists of electronic sliding doors with mirrored surfaces on both sides, through which a viewer can walk in an apparently endless passage. The doors are installed inside a corridor that traverses a pond in a garden. Motion sensors cause them to slide open when someone approaches and close when the person moves away. As a result, the movements of viewers alternately break and bind the visual limits of the space, which can be entered from either end of the corridor, increasing the likelihood of unexpected encounters.

Carsten Höller, Seven Sliding Doors Corridor (Outdoor Version), 2021, installation view, Luma Arles, France © Carsten Höller. Photo: Adrian Deweerdt

Carsten Höller, Isometric Slides, 2021 (detail), installation view, The Tower, Luma Arles, France © Carsten Höller. Photo: Mark Domage

Permanent Installation

Carsten Höller
Isometric Slides

Carsten Höller has developed a site-specific slide for the Tower at Luma Arles, France, designed by Frank Gehry. According to Höller, “a slide is a sculpture that you can travel inside” and experience a unique emotional state situated between pleasure and madness. However, the artist emphasizes that it is not necessary to use the slide to make sense of it—observing other visitors travel between levels of the building is an equally stimulating experience.

Carsten Höller, Isometric Slides, 2021 (detail), installation view, The Tower, Luma Arles, France © Carsten Höller. Photo: Mark Domage

Photo: Antony Hoffman

Award

Mary Weatherford
Aspen Award for Art

Mary Weatherford is the recipient of the 2021 Aspen Award for Art, which will be presented on Friday, August 6. The award was established in 2005 by the Aspen Art Museum in Colorado to recognize individual artists making exemplary contributions to contemporary art.

On the occasion of the award, Weatherford will be in conversation with Nicola Lees, director of the Aspen Art Museum; Simone Krug, assistant curator; and Luis Yllanes, chief operating officer. The group will discuss Weatherford’s recent exhibition Neon Paintings, which was recently on view at the museum.

Photo: Antony Hoffman

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Museum Exhibitions

Installation view, Taryn Simon: The Color of a Flea’s Eye: The Picture Collection, New York Public Library, 2020. Artwork © Taryn Simon. Photo: Rob McKeever

Opening this Week

Taryn Simon
The Color of a Flea’s Eye: The Picture Collection

September 23, 2021–January 9, 2022
New York Public Library
www.nypl.org

A project nine years in the making, The Color of a Flea’s Eye foregrounds the New York Public Library’s Picture Collection, whose storied images have been available, for more than a century, for the public to sift through in search of visual references of every conceivable kind. Intrigued by the Picture Collection since childhood, in 2012 Taryn Simon embarked on a study of its underlying patterns, codes, and orders. Her photography of its contents reveals it to be an inadvertent recorder of changing social mores, disclosing latent fault lines of power, race, and gender.

Installation view, Taryn Simon: The Color of a Flea’s Eye: The Picture Collection, New York Public Library, 2020. Artwork © Taryn Simon. Photo: Rob McKeever

Walter De Maria, Untitled [Desert Walk], c. 1961, Menil Collection, Houston © Estate of Walter De Maria. Photo: Paul Hester

Closing this Week

Dream Monuments
Drawing in the 1960s and 1970s

Through September 19, 2021
Menil Collection, Houston
www.menil.org

This exhibition presents drawings that challenge the conventional idea of the monument as a permanent, grand, or commemorative form. The provisional character of drawing helped artists envision forms in improbable scales and for impossible conditions, radically transforming the monument to reflect a new set of sensibilities. Scaled to the size of the page but enormous in ambition, these works rethink history while rendering environments as at turns absurd, surreal, or subjective. Work by Walter De Maria and Michael Heizer is included.

Walter De Maria, Untitled [Desert Walk], c. 1961, Menil Collection, Houston © Estate of Walter De Maria. Photo: Paul Hester

Georg Baselitz, B. für Larry (Remix), 2006 © Georg Baselitz

Closing this Week

Wonderland

Through September 19, 2021
Albertina Modern, Vienna
www.albertina.at

Inspired by Lewis Carroll’s 1865 novel Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, this exhibition features more than a hundred contemporary artworks from the Albertina’s collection organized into seven different “chapters” conceived as independent yet loosely connected “worlds.”  Work by Georg Baselitz, Katharina Grosse, Anselm Kiefer, Roy Lichtenstein, Albert Oehlen, Andy Warhol, and Franz West is included.

Georg Baselitz, B. für Larry (Remix), 2006 © Georg Baselitz

Gregory Crewdson, Back Lot, 2018–19 © Gregory Crewdson

Closing this Week

Road Rage

Through September 20, 2021
The Church, Sag Harbor, New York
www.sagharborchurch.org

Road Rage brings together works by twenty-four artists who use the car as subject or material. Dating from the 1960s to the present, the paintings, photographs, sculptures, drawings, and animated film on display consider automobiles as tools of travel, consumption, and commerce, and as icons of wealth, class, leisure, power, destruction, and pollution. Work by Gregory Crewdson and Richard Prince is included.

Gregory Crewdson, Back Lot, 2018–19 © Gregory Crewdson

Titus Kaphar and Reginald Dwayne Betts, Redaction (San Francisco), 2020 © Titus Kaphar and Reginald Dwayne Betts. Photo: Christopher Gardner

Just Opened

Titus Kaphar in
The Black Index

Through December 11, 2021
Art Galleries at Black Studies, University of Texas at Austin
www.galleriesatut.org

The artists featured in The Black Index build upon the tradition of Black self-representation as an antidote to colonialist images. Using drawing, performance, printmaking, sculpture, and digital technology to transform the recorded image, they question our reliance on photography as a privileged source for documentary objectivity and understanding. Their works offer an alternative practice—a Black index—that serves as a finding aid for information about Black subjects, but also challenges viewers’ desire for classification. Work by Titus Kaphar is included. This exhibition originated at the Contemporary Arts Center Gallery, University of California, Irvine.

Titus Kaphar and Reginald Dwayne Betts, Redaction (San Francisco), 2020 © Titus Kaphar and Reginald Dwayne Betts. Photo: Christopher Gardner

Willem de Kooning, . . . Whose Name Was Writ in Water, 1975, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York © 2021 The Willem de Kooning Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Just Opened

Chaïm Soutine/Willem de Kooning, la peinture incarnée

Through January 10, 2022
Musée de l’Orangerie, Paris
www.musee-orangerie.fr

Chaïm Soutine/Willem de Kooning, la peinture incarnée explores affinities between the work of Chaïm Soutine (1893–1943) and Willem de Kooning (1904–1997). The exhibition, which places nearly forty-five works by the two artists in visual dialogue, considers how Soutine’s paintings, with their built-up surfaces and energetic brushwork, informed de Kooning’s art, shaping his figurative/abstract works in the late 1940s and beyond. This exhibition has traveled from the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia, where it had the title Soutine/de Kooning: Conversations in Paint.

Willem de Kooning, . . . Whose Name Was Writ in Water, 1975, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York © 2021 The Willem de Kooning Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Cameo, 1980 © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./DACS/Tyler Graphics Ltd., Bedford Village, New York

Just Opened

Helen Frankenthaler
Radical Beauty

Through April 18, 2022
Dulwich Picture Gallery, London
www.dulwichpicturegallery.org.uk

Radical Beauty presents Helen Frankenthaler’s groundbreaking woodcuts, which appear painterly and spontaneous with expanses of color and fluid forms. The exhibition reveals Frankenthaler as a trailblazer of the mid-century printmaking renaissance among American abstract artists, endlessly pushing the possibilities of the medium through experimentation. Highlights of the exhibition include East and Beyond (1973), created by printing onto multiple blocks to avoid negative space, and Cameo (1980), in which Frankenthaler introduced a new layered approach to color using her “guzzying” technique, where she worked surfaces with sandpaper and dental tools to achieve different effects.

Helen Frankenthaler, Cameo, 1980 © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./DACS/Tyler Graphics Ltd., Bedford Village, New York

Y.Z. Kami, Black Dome, 2015 © Y.Z. Kami

Just Opened

Y.Z. Kami in
Rebel, Jester, Mystic, Poet: Contemporary Persians

Through January 16, 2022
Asia Society, New York
asiasociety.org

Drawn from the Mohammed Afkhami Collection, Rebel, Jester, Mystic, Poet: Contemporary Persians presents works by more than twenty artists from Iran and its diaspora. Revising traditional aesthetics and probing subjects such as gender identity, war, peace, religion, and spirituality, the works, which date from 1998 to the present, are realized in a variety of mediums, from painting and sculpture to photography and video installation. Through open critique or subterfuge, humor, spirituality, and poetry, the artists overcome the restrictions and pressures that have affected Iranians in the past quarter century. This exhibition originated at the Aga Khan Museum in Toronto. Work by Y.Z. Kami is included.

Y.Z. Kami, Black Dome, 2015 © Y.Z. Kami

Sterling Ruby, SP132, 2010 © Sterling Ruby. Photo: Robert Wedemeyer

Just Opened

Sterling Ruby in
Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams

Through February 20, 2022
Brooklyn Museum, New York
www.brooklynmuseum.org

This exhibition traces the groundbreaking history and legacy of the House of Dior, bringing to life Dior’s many sources of inspiration, from the splendor of flowers and other natural forms to classical and contemporary art. With objects drawn primarily from the Dior archives, it includes over two hundred haute couture garments as well as photographs, archival videos, sketches, vintage perfume elements, accessories, and works from the museum’s collection. Work by Sterling Ruby is included.

Sterling Ruby, SP132, 2010 © Sterling Ruby. Photo: Robert Wedemeyer

Sarah Sze, Mirror with Landscape Leaning (Fragment Series), 2015, Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut © Sarah Sze

Just Opened

Sarah Sze in
On the Basis of Art: 150 Years of Women at Yale

Through January 9, 2022
Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut
artgallery.yale.edu

On the Basis of Art celebrates the achievements of women artists who have graduated from Yale University. Presented on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of coeducation at Yale College and the 150th anniversary of the first women students at the University, who came to study at the Yale School of the Fine Arts when it opened in 1869—the exhibition features works drawn entirely from the Yale University Art Gallery’s collection. The exhibition title refers to a phrase in Title IX, the landmark 1972 US federal law declaring that no one in an education program receiving federal financial assistance could be discriminated against “on the basis of sex.” Work by Sarah Sze is included.

Sarah Sze, Mirror with Landscape Leaning (Fragment Series), 2015, Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut © Sarah Sze

Andy Warhol, Dolly Parton and Keith Haring, 1985 © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. Licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Just Opened

Andy Warhol
Photo Factory

Through January 31, 2022
Fotografiska, New York
www.fotografiska.com

Photo Factory presents some of Andy Warhol’s earliest photographic works, offering a glimpse into his experimentation with the medium and how it served as a catalyst for his early silkscreen paintings, commissioned portraits, and commercial work. The exhibition features Polaroids of celebrities, artists, and friends; lesser-seen unique gelatin silver prints; Polaroid collages; 16mm film Screen Tests from the mid-1960s; and stitched photographs from Warhol’s final exhibition in 1987.

Andy Warhol, Dolly Parton and Keith Haring, 1985 © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. Licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Katharina Grosse, Shutter Splinter, 2021, installation view, Helsinki Biennial, June 12–September 26, 2021. Artwork © Katharina Grosse and VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, Germany 2021. Photo: Hans Grosse

On View

Katharina Grosse in
Helsinki Biennial: On the Shores of the Same Sea

Through September 26, 2021
Various sites on Vallisaari Island and on mainland Helsinki
helsinkibiennaali.fi

The inaugural Helsinki Biennial brings contemporary art to the unique surroundings of Vallisaari Island, a short ferry ride from mainland Helsinki. Artworks are installed along a three-kilometer-long trail and inside the island’s historical buildings, as well as on the mainland. Exploring themes of interconnectedness and mutual dependence, the biennial includes work by forty artists and collectives from Finland and around the world, including Katharina Grosse, who converted Vallisaari’s old derelict school building and its surroundings into a painting.

Katharina Grosse, Shutter Splinter, 2021, installation view, Helsinki Biennial, June 12–September 26, 2021. Artwork © Katharina Grosse and VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, Germany 2021. Photo: Hans Grosse

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