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Adriana Varejão, Testemunhas oculares X, Y e Z, 1997 © Adriana Varejão. Photo: Eduardo Ortega

On View

Adriana Varejão
Otros cuerpos detrás

Through November 10, 2019
Museo Tamayo, Mexico City
museotamayo.org

This show, whose title translates to Other Bodies Behind, explores the lines of research that Adriana Varejão has developed in her artistic practice since the 1990s, bringing together work created over the past thirty years. The exhibition is structured around three different bodies of work—early figurative canvases, a selection from the series Ruínas de Charque (Jerked-Beef Ruins), and recent Polvo paintings.

Adriana Varejão, Testemunhas oculares X, Y e Z, 1997 © Adriana Varejão. Photo: Eduardo Ortega

Adriana Varejão, Cadernos de viagem: Yãkoana, 2003 © Adriana Varejão. Photo: Patrick Grie

On View

Nous les arbres

Through January 5, 2020
Fondation Cartier, Paris
www.fondationcartier.com

Organized around several large ensembles of works, this exhibition, whose title translates to We, the Trees, gives voice to numerous figures who have developed a strong, intimate link with trees, thereby revealing the beauty and biological wealth of these great protagonists of the living world, threatened today with large-scale deforestation. Work by Giuseppe Penone and Adriana Varejão is included.

Adriana Varejão, Cadernos de viagem: Yãkoana, 2003 © Adriana Varejão. Photo: Patrick Grie

Adriana Varejão, Parede com Incisões à la Fontana—Horizontal (Wall with Incisions à la Fontana—Horizontal), 2009–11 © Adriana Varejão. Photo: Jaime Acioli

On View

Adriana Varejão in
Home Is a Foreign Place

Through June 21, 2020
Met Breuer, New York
www.metmuseum.org

This exhibition features a diverse group of paintings, sculptures, installations, and videos made between 1944 and 2016 that explore artistic engagements with language, architecture, space, politics, and media. The thematic installation asks viewers to reconsider what it means to make a home in the world, whether by chance, necessity, or choice. Work by Adriana Varejão is included.

Adriana Varejão, Parede com Incisões à la Fontana—Horizontal (Wall with Incisions à la Fontana—Horizontal), 2009–11 © Adriana Varejão. Photo: Jaime Acioli

Adriana Varejão, Ruína de Charque–Vigário Geral (Vigário Geral Jerked–Beef Ruin), 2002 (detail), Dallas Museum of Art © Adriana Varejão

Closed

Adriana Varejão in
America Will Be!: Surveying the Contemporary Landscape

April 6–September 15, 2019
Dallas Museum of Art
www.dma.org

Drawing on works from the museum’s permanent collection, this exhibition investigates the ways in which contemporary artists engage with landscapes, broadly defined, exploring how our natural and built environments intersect with our representations of ourselves and our communities. The show aims to delve into how contemporary “landscapes” might better reflect the full diversity of the people who inhabit North and South America. Work by Adriana Varejão is included.

Adriana Varejão, Ruína de Charque–Vigário Geral (Vigário Geral Jerked–Beef Ruin), 2002 (detail), Dallas Museum of Art © Adriana Varejão

Adriana Varejão, Quadro Ferido (Wounded Painting), 1992 © Adriana Varejão. Photo: Eduardo Ortega

Closed

Adriana Varejão
Por uma retórica canibal

June 28–September 8, 2019
Museu de Arte Moderna Aloísio Magalhães, Recife, Brazil
blogmamam.wordpress.com

The exhibition seeks to emphasize that Adriana Varejão was already developing research on a historical revision of colonialism long before postcolonial studies were at the center of the contemporary art debate. The show features some twenty works, made between 1992 and 2016, that refer to Salvador, Bahia, the city with the largest African heritage in Brazil and the municipality that inspired much of Varejão’s poetics. This exhibition has traveled from the Museu de Arte Moderna da Bahia in Salvador, Brazil.

Adriana Varejão, Quadro Ferido (Wounded Painting), 1992 © Adriana Varejão. Photo: Eduardo Ortega

Adriana Varejão, Big Polvo Color Wheel V, 2018 © Adriana Varejão. Photo: Jaime Acioli

Closed

Adriana Varejão in
Hinge Pictures: Eight Women Artists Occupy the Third Dimension

March 14–June 16, 2019
Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans
cacno.org

Hinge Pictures: Eight Women Artists Occupy the Third Dimension takes its name from the writings of Marcel Duchamp in his La boite verte (1934). The artists in the exhibition use formal constraint—a commitment to abstraction—to demonstrate social liberation and to confront the patrimony of European modernism. Work by Adriana Varejão is included.

Adriana Varejão, Big Polvo Color Wheel V, 2018 © Adriana Varejão. Photo: Jaime Acioli

Adriana Varejão, Proposal for a Catechesis—Part I Diptych: Death and Dismemberment, 1993 © Adriana Varejão. Photo: Eduardo Ortega

Closed

Adriana Varejão
Por uma retórica canibal

April 16–June 15, 2019
Museu de Arte Moderna da Bahia, Salvador, Brazil
www.ipac.ba.gov.br

The exhibition seeks to emphasize that Adriana Varejão was already developing research on a historical revision of colonialism long before postcolonial studies were at the center of the contemporary art debate. The show features some twenty works, made between 1992 and 2016, that refer to Salvador, Bahia, the city with the largest African heritage in Brazil and the municipality that inspired much of Varejão’s poetics.

Adriana Varejão, Proposal for a Catechesis—Part I Diptych: Death and Dismemberment, 1993 © Adriana Varejão. Photo: Eduardo Ortega