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Installation view, Mark Grotjahn: 50 Kitchens, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, May 20–August 19, 2018. Artwork © Mark Grotjahn. Photo: Museum Associates/LACMA

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Mark Grotjahn
50 Kitchens

May 20–August 19, 2018
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
www.lacma.org

Conceived as one work, Mark Grotjahn’s 50 Kitchens (2013–18) takes its inspiration from a single Butterfly composition that Grotjahn made to meet the dimensional specifications of a wall in his kitchen. The more than fifty subsequent chromatic drawings explore pairs of radiating colors and together create a prismatic display. Grotjahn began making his Butterfly compositions in 2001. This exhibition was the first presentation of 50 Kitchens at LACMA.

Installation view, Mark Grotjahn: 50 Kitchens, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, May 20–August 19, 2018. Artwork © Mark Grotjahn. Photo: Museum Associates/LACMA

Mary Weatherford, la noche, 2014 © Mary Weatherford. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen Studio

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The Forever Now
Contemporary Painting in an Atemporal World

December 14, 2014–April 5, 2015
Museum of Modern Art, New York
www.moma.org

Forever Now presents the work of seventeen artists whose paintings reflect a singular approach that characterizes our cultural moment at the beginning of the new millennium: they refuse to allow us to define or even meter our time by them. They represent a wide variety of styles and impulses, but all use the painted surface as a platform, map, or metaphoric screen on which genres intermingle, morph, and collide. Work by Joe Bradley, Mark Grotjahn, and Mary Weatherford is included.

Mary Weatherford, la noche, 2014 © Mary Weatherford. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen Studio

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Scribble Scrabble French Mask M31.b), 2013 © Mark Grotjahn

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Mark Grotjahn
Sculpture

May 31–August 17, 2014
Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas
www.nashersculpturecenter.org

This exhibition was the first dedicated museum presentation of Mark Grotjahn’s sculpture, which the artist began producing privately in 2000, alongside his painting practice. It showcased many never-before-seen, three-dimensional works, ranging in size from small, intimate compositions to larger-scale freestanding works. Combining common cardboard boxes and tubes and cutting them to roughly resemble masks or faces, Grotjahn then scraped these assemblages and cast them in bronze, which he either left raw or elaborately painted.

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Scribble Scrabble French Mask M31.b), 2013 © Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Circus No. 2 Face 44.19), 2013 © Mark Grotjahn

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Mark Grotjahn
Circus Circus

May 16–July 27, 2014
Kunstverein Freiburg, Germany
www.kunstvereinfreiburg.de

Circus Circus was Mark Grotjahn’s first solo exhibition in Germany. Both adopting and commenting on a range of art historical influences, from Renaissance-era drawing technique to Abstract Expressionism and Op art, the works on view demonstrated the artist’s ability to combine the opposing modes of abstraction and figuration. The presentation included a new series of large-scale paintings.

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Circus No. 2 Face 44.19), 2013 © Mark Grotjahn

Installation view, Mark Grotjahn, Aspen Art Museum, Colorado, February 17–April 29, 2012. Artwork © Mark Grotjahn

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Mark Grotjahn

February 17–April 29, 2012
Aspen Art Museum, Colorado
www.aspenartmuseum.org

Featuring work produced from the late 1990s to the early 2010s, this exhibition was Mark Grotjahn’s first comprehensive museum survey in the United States. The presentation included paintings from his Perspective and Butterfly series that explore the constructs of dual and multi-point perspective, as well as from his expressive and anthropomorphic Face series. Five Mask sculptures were also on view, on the grounds of the museum and on four nearby ski mountains.

Installation view, Mark Grotjahn, Aspen Art Museum, Colorado, February 17–April 29, 2012. Artwork © Mark Grotjahn