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Installation view, Third Dimension: Works from the Brant Foundation, Brant Foundation, New York, November 13, 2019–September 3, 2020. Artwork, front to back: © Urs Fischer, © Dan Flavin

On View

Third Dimension
Works from the Brant Foundation

Through September 3, 2020
Brant Foundation, New York
brantfoundation.org

Bringing together more than twenty artists integral to the Brant Foundation’s collection, this exhibition offers a glimpse into the multifaceted practices of artists whose work Peter M. Brant has collected over the past fifty years. Work by Jean-Michel Basquiat, Urs Fischer, Mike Kelley, Adam McEwen, Richard Prince, Andy Warhol, and Franz West is included.

Installation view, Third Dimension: Works from the Brant Foundation, Brant Foundation, New York, November 13, 2019–September 3, 2020. Artwork, front to back: © Urs Fischer, © Dan Flavin

Taryn Simon, Oxalis tuberosa, Peru (7CFR) (prohibited), 2010, from the series Contraband, 2010 © Taryn Simon

On View

Civilisation, Photography, Now

Through October 18, 2020
Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki, New Zealand
www.aucklandartgallery.com

Civilisation, Photography, Now features more than two hundred works from one hundred international photographers. The exhibition considers patterns of mass behavior and the complexities of life in twenty-first-century urban environments. This show originated at the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Seoul, as Civilization: The Way We Live Now. Work by Mike Kelley, Vera Lutter, and Taryn Simon is included.

Taryn Simon, Oxalis tuberosa, Peru (7CFR) (prohibited), 2010, from the series Contraband, 2010 © Taryn Simon

On View

Untitled, 2020

Through December 13, 2020
Punta della Dogana, Venice
www.palazzograssi.it

Conceived and curated by Thomas Houseago, Muna El Fituri, and Caroline Bourgeois, Untitled, 2020 places into dialogue works in a broad range of media by more than sixty artists held by the Pinault Collection, international museums, and private collections. The exhibition centers around a re-creation of Houseago’s studio in Tadao Ando’s cube room, in the heart of Punta della Dogana. Work by Ellen Gallagher, Duane Hanson, Mike Kelley, Henry Moore, and Nam June Paik is included.

Shio Kusaka, (line 5), 2010 © Shio Kusaka

On View

Making Knowing
Craft in Art, 1950–2019

November 22, 2019–January 2021
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
whitney.org

Making Knowing: Craft in Art, 1950–2019 foregrounds how visual artists have explored the materials, methods, and strategies of craft over the past seven decades. Some expand techniques with long histories, such as weaving, sewing, or pottery, while others experiment with clay, beads, and glass, among other mediums. Work by Richard Artschwager, Mike Kelley, Shio Kusaka, and Sterling Ruby is included.

Shio Kusaka, (line 5), 2010 © Shio Kusaka

Douglas Gordon, Déjà-Vu, 2000
, installation view, Geffen Contemporary at MOCA, Los Angeles. Artwork © Studio lost but found/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2020
. D.O.A., 1950, USA. Directed by Rudolph Maté. Produced by Joseph H. Nadel, Harry M. Popkin, and Leo C. Popkin. Distributed by United Artists © Cardinal Pictures. Photo: Brian Forrest
 

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In Production
Art and the Studio System

November 7, 2019–March 1, 2020
Yuz Museum, Shanghai
www.yuzmshanghai.org

In Production: Art and the Studio System emphasizes the overlapping histories of visual art and film, with a particular focus on how the site of the studio, both in visual arts and in cinematic production, has radically shifted in the last twenty years. The exhibition highlights the exceptional gifts and acquisitions related to film and video that have entered the Los Angeles County Museum of Art’s permanent collection in recent years including work by Piero Golia, Douglas Gordon, Alex Israel, and Mike Kelley.

Douglas Gordon, Déjà-Vu, 2000
, installation view, Geffen Contemporary at MOCA, Los Angeles. Artwork © Studio lost but found/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2020
. D.O.A., 1950, USA. Directed by Rudolph Maté. Produced by Joseph H. Nadel, Harry M. Popkin, and Leo C. Popkin. Distributed by United Artists © Cardinal Pictures. Photo: Brian Forrest
 

Vera Lutter, Clock Tower, Brooklyn, XXXVI: June 16, 2009, 2009 © Vera Lutter

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Civilization
The Way We Live Now

September 13, 2019–February 2, 2020
National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia
www.ngv.vic.gov.au

Civilization: The Way We Live Now features more than two hundred works from one hundred international photographers. The exhibition considers patterns of mass behavior and the complexities of life in twenty-first-century urban environments. This show originated at the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Seoul. Work by Mike Kelley, Vera Lutter, and Taryn Simon is included. 

Vera Lutter, Clock Tower, Brooklyn, XXXVI: June 16, 2009, 2009 © Vera Lutter

Chris Burden, Exposing the Foundation of the Museum, 1986 © 2019 Chris Burden/Licensed by the Chris Burden Estate and Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Squidds and Nunns

Closed

The Foundation of the Museum
MOCA’s Collection

May 19, 2019–January 20, 2020
Geffen Contemporary at MOCA, Los Angeles
www.moca.org

To mark the museum’s fortieth anniversary, this exhibition presents a selected topography of artworks that speak to the diversity of MOCA’s collecting over the past four decades. With special emphasis on works associated with the museum’s remarkable history of exhibitions, The Foundation of the Museum: MOCA’s Collection shows the institution’s holdings as shaped by a changing landscape of developments in contemporary art and curatorial focus, as well by as the social and cultural backdrops that inform them. Work by Chris Burden, Mike Kelley, Bruce Nauman, Albert Oehlen, Nancy Rubins, and Ed Ruscha is included.

Chris Burden, Exposing the Foundation of the Museum, 1986 © 2019 Chris Burden/Licensed by the Chris Burden Estate and Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Squidds and Nunns

Taryn Simon, Oxalis tuberosa, Peru (7CFR) (prohibited), 2010, from the series Contraband, 2010 © Taryn Simon

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Civilization
The Way We Live Now

March 9–May 19, 2019
Ullens Center for Contemporary Art, Beijing
ucca.org.cn

Civilization: The Way We Live Now features more than two hundred works from one hundred international photographers. The show addresses and illuminates major aspects of our increasingly global civilization and stresses the fact that contemporary society is an extremely complex collective enterprise. Work by Mike Kelley, Vera Lutter, and Taryn Simon is included. This show originated at the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Seoul.

Taryn Simon, Oxalis tuberosa, Peru (7CFR) (prohibited), 2010, from the series Contraband, 2010 © Taryn Simon

Vera Lutter, Clock Tower, Brooklyn, XXXVI: June 16, 2009, 2009 © Vera Lutter

Closed

Civilization
The Way We Live Now

October 18, 2018–February 17, 2019
National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Seoul
www.mmca.go.kr

Civilization: The Way We Live Now features more than two hundred works from one hundred international photographers. The show addresses and illuminates major aspects of our increasingly global civilization and stresses the fact that contemporary society is an extremely complex collective enterprise. Work by Mike Kelley, Vera Lutter, and Taryn Simon is included.

Vera Lutter, Clock Tower, Brooklyn, XXXVI: June 16, 2009, 2009 © Vera Lutter

Ed Ruscha and Billy Al Bengston, Business Cards, 1968, Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago © Ed Ruscha and Billy Al Bengston. Photo: Nathan Keay © MCA Chicago

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West by Midwest

November 17, 2018–January 27, 2019
Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago
mcachicago.org

West by Midwest tells a story that illuminates the ways that contemporary art practices spread and develop by tracing the intersecting lives of artists who have migrated from the American Midwest to the West Coast since the mid-twentieth century. Lured by career opportunities, warmer weather, and the prospect of a better life promised by the postwar boom, those artists who were able to migrate attended art schools together, shared studios, exhibited work in the same galleries, collaborated on projects, engaged in activism, and dated one another. Work by Mike Kelley, Bruce Nauman, Sterling Ruby, and Ed Ruscha is included.

Ed Ruscha and Billy Al Bengston, Business Cards, 1968, Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago © Ed Ruscha and Billy Al Bengston. Photo: Nathan Keay © MCA Chicago

Willem de Kooning, Woman and Bicycle, 1952–53, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York © The Willem de Kooning Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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Human Interest
Portraits from the Whitney’s Collection

April 2, 2016–April 2, 2017
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
whitney.org

Human Interest offers new perspectives on one of art’s oldest genres. Drawn entirely from the museum’s holdings, the more than two hundred works in the exhibition show changing approaches to portraiture from the early 1900s until today. Bringing iconic works together with lesser-known examples and recent acquisitions in a range of mediums, the exhibition unfolds in eleven thematic sections. Work by Jean-Michel Basquiat, Willem de Kooning, Roe Ethridge, Duane Hanson, Mike KelleySally MannMan RayBruce NaumanRichard PrinceEd RuschaCindy ShermanRudolf StingelAndy Warhol, and Jonas Wood is included.

Willem de Kooning, Woman and Bicycle, 1952–53, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York © The Willem de Kooning Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Mary Weatherford, Olive Downtown, 2014 © Mary Weatherford. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen Studio

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Pretty Raw
After and Around Helen Frankenthaler

February 11–June 7, 2015
Rose Art Museum, Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts
www.brandeis.edu

Pretty Raw takes the artist Helen Frankenthaler as a lens through which to refocus our vision of modernist art over the past fifty years. In this version, decoration, humor, femininity and masculinity, the everyday, pleasure, and authorial control take center stage. The exhibition, curated by Katy Siegel, features works by artists from the 1950s through the present who have found personal, social, and political meaning in materiality. Work by Helen Frankenthaler, Mike Kelley, Sterling Ruby, Andy Warhol, Mary Weatherford, and Christopher Wool is included.

Mary Weatherford, Olive Downtown, 2014 © Mary Weatherford. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen Studio