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Nathaniel Mary Quinn. Photo: Kyle Dorosz

In Conversation

The Un-Private Collection
Nathaniel Mary Quinn and Donna Augustin-Quinn

Saturday, November 20, 2021, 2pm
The Broad, Los Angeles
www.thebroad.org

As part of the Un-Private Collection, an ongoing series of public programs organized by the Broad, Los Angeles, Nathaniel Mary Quinn will be joined by actress, director, writer, and producer Donna Augustin-Quinn. The pair will discuss Quinn’s work in the Broad’s collection, as well as the artist’s practice at large. The talk is being held in conjunction with the exhibition Since Unveiling: Selected Acquisitions of a Decade, on view at the Broad through April 3, 2022. To attend the event, purchase tickets at ticketing.thebroad.org.

Nathaniel Mary Quinn. Photo: Kyle Dorosz

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Breonna Taylor, 2020 © Nathaniel Mary Quinn

Support

Show Me the Signs

November 10–30, 2020

Show Me the Signs is an online benefit auction hosted by Artfizz to support the families of Black women killed by the police. Over 100 artists have created pieces in the form of protest signs for the auction, with 100 percent of the proceeds going to the African American Policy Forum’s #SayHerName Mothers Network. Work by Louise Bonnet, Piero Golia, Meleko Mokgosi, Nathaniel Mary Quinn, and Nancy Rubins is included. To register to bid, visit artfizz.com.

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Breonna Taylor, 2020 © Nathaniel Mary Quinn

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Treasure Hunt #2, 2020 © Nathaniel Mary Quinn

Support

Cecily Brown, Giuseppe Penone, and Nathaniel Mary Quinn in
100 Drawings from Now

October 7, 2020–January 17, 2021
Drawing Center, New York
drawingcenter.org

The benefit exhibition 100 Drawings from Now features drawings made by an international group of artists since early 2020, providing a snapshot of artistic production during the period of profound global unrest that has resulted from the ongoing health and economic crises, as well as the surge of activism in response to systemic racism, social injustice, and police brutality in the United States. Together, the donated works spotlight the urgency, intimacy, and universality of drawing during moments of upheaval and isolation. Proceeds from the sales will support the Drawing Center and the artists. Work by Cecily Brown, Giuseppe Penone, and Nathaniel Mary Quinn is included.

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Treasure Hunt #2, 2020 © Nathaniel Mary Quinn

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, How Come Not Me, 2019 © Nathaniel Mary Quinn

Tour

Nathaniel Mary Quinn
Hollow and Cut

Saturday, September 14, 2019, 1pm
Gagosian, Beverly Hills

Gagosian director Ashley Stewart will lead a tour of the exhibition Nathaniel Mary Quinn: Hollow and Cut at Gagosian, Beverly Hills. The show features new composite portraits by the artist that explore the relationship between perception and memory. The paintings and works on paper probe deeply embedded experiences and emotions that are not often discussed in public by illuminating the subconscious aspects of the human psyche. To attend the free event, RSVP to bhtours@gagosian.com. Space is limited.

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, How Come Not Me, 2019 © Nathaniel Mary Quinn

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Big Rabbit, Little Rabbit, 2017 © Nathaniel Mary Quinn

In Conversation

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Eric N. Mack, Lorraine O’Grady

Thursday, May 30, 2019, 7–9pm
Brooklyn Museum, New York
brooklynmuseum.org

In a series of rapid-fire talks with Brooklyn Museum curators, Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Eric N. Mack, and Lorraine O’Grady will discuss their unique artistic practices, historical inspirations, and how their work expands the Western art-historical canon. The discussion is titled “Breaking the Canon.” To attend the event, purchase tickets at www.brooklynmuseum.org.

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Big Rabbit, Little Rabbit, 2017 © Nathaniel Mary Quinn

Announcements

Photo: Kyle Dorosz

Video

Nathaniel Mary Quinn
Dominique Clayton

Nathaniel Mary Quinn speaks with Dominique Clayton from the Broad, Los Angeles, about his approach to figuration and the central role that empathy and vulnerability play within his studio practice. He discusses how social distancing has reinforced his perspective on the important role of art and explains how the writings of Henry David Thoreau, which he has been reading while practicing social distancing, have inspired him.

Photo: Kyle Dorosz

Nathaniel Mary Quinn. Photo: Kyle Dorosz

New Representation

Nathaniel Mary Quinn

Gagosian is pleased to announce the representation of Nathaniel Mary Quinn. Collecting imagery that he tears, cuts, and overlaps on the walls of his studio, Quinn uses oil paint, charcoal, gouache, oil stick, and pastels to render facial features and details from sources both personal and found, covering parts of the canvas as he goes. Fragments of images taken from online searches, fashion magazines, and family photographs come together to form hybrid faces and figures that are at once neo-Dada and adamantly realist, evoking the intimacy and intensity of a face-to-face encounter with an alien other. By adapting the medium of collage and translating it into cohesive two-dimensionality, Quinn suggests that multiplicity is a perennial rather than fleeting state.

Download the full press release (PDF)

Nathaniel Mary Quinn. Photo: Kyle Dorosz

Nathaniel Mary Quinn. Photo: Kyle Dorosz

Honor

Nathaniel Mary Quinn

Nathaniel Mary Quinn will be honored at the Drawing Center Annual Benefit Gala on April 24, 2019 in New York.

Nathaniel Mary Quinn. Photo: Kyle Dorosz

Museum Exhibitions

Installation view, Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Le Consortium, Dijon, France, February 4–May 22, 2022. Artwork © Nathaniel Mary Quinn. Photo: Rebecca Fanuele, courtesy Consortium Museum

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Nathaniel Mary Quinn

February 4–May 22, 2022
Le Consortium, Dijon, France
www.leconsortium.fr

This first solo exhibition in France of work by Nathaniel Mary Quinn, curated by Le Consortium’s codirector Eric Troncy, brings together fifteen paintings unfolding around The Director (2019), which was gifted to the museum’s collection. Quinn’s striking composite portraits draw on both memory and fragments of found images sourced from magazines, personal photographs, and the Internet.

Installation view, Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Le Consortium, Dijon, France, February 4–May 22, 2022. Artwork © Nathaniel Mary Quinn. Photo: Rebecca Fanuele, courtesy Consortium Museum

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Uncle Dope, 2017 © Nathaniel Mary Quinn. Photo: Michael Tropea

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Black American Portraits

November 7, 2021–April 17, 2022
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
www.lacma.org

Remembering Two Centuries of Black American Art, guest curated by David Driskell at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 1976, and complementing the presentation at lacma of The Obama Portraits by Kehinde Wiley and Amy Sherald, Black American Portraits reframes portraiture to center Black American subjects, sitters, and spaces. Spanning more than two centuries from circa 1800 to the present day, this selection of approximately 140 works draws primarily from lacma’s permanent collection and chronicles the ways in which Black Americans have used portraiture to envision themselves in their own eyes. Countering a visual culture that often demonizes Blackness and fetishizes the spectacle of Black pain, these images center love, abundance, family, community, and exuberance. Work by Titus Kaphar and Nathaniel Mary Quinn is included.

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Uncle Dope, 2017 © Nathaniel Mary Quinn. Photo: Michael Tropea

Taryn Simon, Press XL, from the series Paperwork and the Will of Capital, 2015, Brooklyn Museum, New York © Taryn Simon

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The Slipstream
Reflection, Resilience, and Resistance in the Art of Our Time

May 14, 2021–April 10, 2022
Brooklyn Museum, New York
www.brooklynmuseum.org

The Slipstream draws examples from Brooklyn Museum’s contemporary art collection to contemplate the profound disruption that occurred in 2020. Borrowing its title from an aeronautical term that refers to the pull of the current that is left in the wake of a large and powerful object, the exhibition examines the placement and displacement of power that runs through American history and continues today. The show features more than sixty works by multiple generations of artists from the 1960s to the present day, including Titus Kaphar, Rick Lowe, Nathaniel Mary Quinn, and Taryn Simon.

Taryn Simon, Press XL, from the series Paperwork and the Will of Capital, 2015, Brooklyn Museum, New York © Taryn Simon

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Pure Insecurity, 2019 © Nathaniel Mary Quinn

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Since Unveiling
Selected Acquisitions of a Decade

November 20, 2021–April 3, 2022
The Broad, Los Angeles
www.thebroad.org

Since Unveiling highlights artworks that have entered the Broad collection in the last decade, with some acquisitions completed as recently as this year. The fifty-seven works on view by twenty-nine artists represent many facets of contemporary art, from explorations of abstraction and figuration to examinations of place, identity, and narrative. Many works witness, critique, and interpret current events, speaking to politics and power structures. Work by Gregory Crewdson, Andreas Gursky, and Nathaniel Mary Quinn are included.

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Pure Insecurity, 2019 © Nathaniel Mary Quinn

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Mama in Fall, 2017, Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles © Nathaniel Mary Quinn

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Nathaniel Mary Quinn in
Evidence: Selections from the Permanent Collection

July 1, 2021–February 20, 2022
Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles
www.moca.org

Our experience of time is situational and decidedly elastic, a reality that many of us have perceived with new acuity over the course of the COVID-19 pandemic in ways intimately related to our differing responsibilities and stations in life. This selection of works from the collection of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, considers some of the myriad ways that artists mark, capture, or meditate on the passage of time: its duration, its ordering into past and present, and its relation to memory. Work by Nathaniel Mary Quinn is included.

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Mama in Fall, 2017, Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles © Nathaniel Mary Quinn

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, C’mo’ and Walk with Me, 2019 © Nathaniel Mary Quinn

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Invisible Sun

May 26–October 3, 2021
The Broad, Los Angeles
www.thebroad.org

Developed amid the COVID-19 pandemic and the groundswell of demands for social justice and racial equity, Invisible Sun features artworks that resonate with this unprecedented period of rupture and unrest. The works on view speak to profound transitions, both personal and global—including the AIDS crisis, gender- and race-based violence, unchecked capitalism, and colonialism’s aftermathand form an appeal for healing. Work by Ellen Gallagher and Nathaniel Mary Quinn is included.

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, C’mo’ and Walk with Me, 2019 © Nathaniel Mary Quinn

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Lil’ Barbara, 2017 © Nathaniel Mary Quinn

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Person of Interest

January 31, 2020–July 3, 2021
Sheldon Museum of Art, University of Nebraska–Lincoln
sheldonartmuseum.org

Exploring nuances in portraiture from the late nineteenth century to today—and testing the very definition of the genre—Person of Interest presents depictions of the literal and abstracted body from Sheldon’s rich holdings and selected loans. This exhibition asks open-ended questions about self-fashioning, cultural memory, gender identity, and the performance of identity. In doing so, it prompts conversations about race and representation, institutional power, and lived experiences. Work by Nathaniel Mary Quinn and Jenny Saville is included.

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Lil’ Barbara, 2017 © Nathaniel Mary Quinn

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Ms. Lykes, 2015 © Nathaniel Mary Quinn

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Duro Olowu
Seeing Chicago

February 29–September 13, 2020
Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago
mcachicago.org

Nigerian-born British designer Duro Olowu curates a show that reimagines relationships between artists and objects across time, media, and geography. Moving away from traditional exhibition formats, Olowu combines photographs, paintings, sculptures, and films in dense and textural scenes that incorporate his own work. Work by Brice Marden and Nathaniel Mary Quinn is included.

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Ms. Lykes, 2015 © Nathaniel Mary Quinn

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Someday, 2018 © Nathaniel Mary Quinn. Photo: Jeff McLane, courtesy the artist and M+B, Los Angeles

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Dirty Protest
Selections from the Hammer Contemporary Collection

January 24–May 19, 2019
Hammer Museum, Los Angeles
hammer.ucla.edu

This exhibition highlights a lively mix of painting, sculpture, and media installations by more than thirty international established and emerging artists, drawn from the Hammer Museum’s collection. Work by Chris Burden and Nathaniel Mary Quinn is included.

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Someday, 2018 © Nathaniel Mary Quinn. Photo: Jeff McLane, courtesy the artist and M+B, Los Angeles

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, You Ought to Be With Me, 2018 © Nathaniel Mary Quinn

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Nathaniel Mary Quinn in
Dreamweavers

February 13–April 13, 2019
UTA Artist Space, Beverly Hills, California
utaartistspace.com

Dreamweavers contemplates the surreal in society against a vigorously shifting twenty-first century. The group exhibition examines the paradox of fact and fantasy through the lens of artists who operate from a deeply imaginative, often provocative, psychological space. Kasseem “Swizz Beatz” Dean has collaborated with UTA Artists Space and curator Nicola Vassell to present the show. Work by Nathaniel Mary Quinn is included.

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, You Ought to Be With Me, 2018 © Nathaniel Mary Quinn

See all Museum Exhibitions for Nathaniel Mary Quinn