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Sally Mann, The Bath, 1989 © Sally Mann

On View

Monochrome Multitudes

Through January 8, 2023
Smart Museum of Art, University of Chicago
smartmuseum.uchicago.edu

Revisiting classic modernist ideas about flatness, idealized form, and colors, this exhibition opens up the seemingly reductive format of the monochrome to reveal its global resonance and creative possibilities while working toward a more expansive narrative of twentieth and twenty-first century art. Work by Alexander Calder, Walter De Maria, Helen Frankenthaler, Theaster Gates, Frank Gehry, Sally Mann, and Richard Serra is included.

Sally Mann, The Bath, 1989 © Sally Mann

Richard Serra, Zoo Cage III, 1966 (detail) © Richard Serra/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Galleria La Salita, Rome

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Richard Serra
Animal habitats live and stuffed. . . Roma, La Salita, 1966

June 21–October 9, 2022
MACRO–Museo d’Arte Contemporanea Roma, Rome
www.museomacro.it

This installation aims to reconstruct—through photographic and archival documents and a video drawn from a vintage newsreel—Richard Serra’s first solo exhibition, which opened on May 24, 1966, at Galleria La Salita in Rome. The year before, after attending the Yale School of Art, Serra moved to Florence. While in Italy, he embarked on a series of artistic experiments that equally questioned both an illusionistic approach to pictorial space and the use of the modernist grid. At the original exhibition Serra presented nineteen works—including cages containing live and stuffed animals—and a variety of assemblages. In the presentation at MACRO, images of and written testimonies about this legendary, yet largely unknown show are shown in parallel to conjure a pivotal moment in the history of art and of the exhibition as a medium.

Richard Serra, Zoo Cage III, 1966 (detail) © Richard Serra/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Galleria La Salita, Rome

Richard Serra, Ramble 4-26, 2015 © Richard Serra/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Rob McKeever  

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Serra/Seurat
Dibujos

June 9–September 6, 2022
Guggenheim Bilbao, Spain
www.guggenheim-bilbao.eus

This exhibition, whose subtitle translates to Drawings, places in dialogue drawings by Georges Seurat (1859–1891) and Richard Serra. Though both artists are better known for their work in other mediums (painting and sculpture, respectively), for both the practice of drawing constitutes an end in itself, and an arena in which to explore materiality—working in tones ranging from the opaquest black to the most transparent light.

Richard Serra, Ramble 4-26, 2015 © Richard Serra/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Rob McKeever  

Pablo Picasso, Buste de femme de profil (Femme écrivant), 1932, Fondation Beyeler, Riehen/Basel © Succession Picasso/2020, ProLitteris, Zurich

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Stilles Sehen
Bilder der Ruhe

February 12–November 15, 2020
Fondation Beyeler, Riehen/Basel
www.fondationbeyeler.ch

This exhibition, whose title translates to Silent Vision: Images of Calm and Quiet, features works of modern and contemporary art that deal with the subject of tranquility. Each room is dedicated to a specific aspect of calmness, inviting visitors to see and contemplate, as it were, stillness. Work by Alberto Giacometti, Roy Lichtenstein, Pablo Picasso, Gerhard Richter, Richard Serra, and Andy Warhol is included.

Pablo Picasso, Buste de femme de profil (Femme écrivant), 1932, Fondation Beyeler, Riehen/Basel © Succession Picasso/2020, ProLitteris, Zurich

Jean-Michel Basquiat, Untitled (Plaid), 1982, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York © The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Licensed by Artestar, New York

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Around Day’s End
Downtown New York, 1970–1986

September 3–November 1, 2020
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
whitney.org

This exhibition pays homage to Gordon Matta-Clark’s legendary Day’s End (1975) and features works by twenty-two artists who engaged with the Meatpacking District and West Side piers, among other downtown Manhattan locations, in the 1970s and early 1980s. The show also anticipates David Hammons’s monumental public artwork Day’s End, to be completed in December 2020 and located directly across from the Whitney in Hudson River Park. Work by Jean-Michel Basquiat and Richard Serra is included.

Jean-Michel Basquiat, Untitled (Plaid), 1982, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York © The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Licensed by Artestar, New York

Andreas Gursky, Amazon, 2016 © Andreas Gursky/Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

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The Supermarket of Images

February 11–June 7, 2020
Jeu de Paume, Paris
www.jeudepaume.org

In an age that is oversaturated with images, this exhibition asks questions about their economy—their storage, management, circulation, and fluctuating values. Work by Andreas Gursky and Richard Serra is included.

Andreas Gursky, Amazon, 2016 © Andreas Gursky/Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

Ellen Gallagher, Untitled (10), 2000 © Ellen Gallagher

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Praying for Time

March 2–July 8, 2018
Rose Art Museum, Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts
www.brandeis.edu

Marked by the fall of the Berlin Wall, the attacks of September 11, and civil war, the end of the twentieth century can also be viewed as a time that presaged immense global revolutions, both social and digital, that have transformed our world. Praying for Time reflects the diversity of voices and concerns in art produced during that pivotal period from 1980 through the early 2000s. Work by Gregory Crewdson, Ellen Gallagher, Richard Prince, Richard Serra, and Andy Warhol is included. 

Ellen Gallagher, Untitled (10), 2000 © Ellen Gallagher

Jeff Koons, Rabbit, 1986 © Jeff Koons.Photo by Nathan Keay © MCA Chicago

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We Are Here

August 19, 2017–April 1, 2018
Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago
mcachicago.org

In honor of the Museum of Contemporary Art’s fiftieth anniversary, the museum presents We Are Here, a three-part exhibition drawn from its collection. I Am You gathers works that question how we relate to and shape our environments; You Are Here examines how the role of the viewer has changed over time; and We Are Everywhere showcases artists who borrow from popular culture. Work by Richard Artschwager, Francis Bacon, Chris Burden, Ellen Gallagher, Andreas Gursky, Michael Heizer, Jasper Johns, Jeff Koons, Takashi Murakami, Bruce Nauman, Richard Serra, Cindy Sherman, Rudolf Stingel, Andy Warhol, and Franz West is included.

Jeff Koons, Rabbit, 1986 © Jeff Koons.
Photo by Nathan Keay © MCA Chicago

Installation view, Proof of Life, Weserburg | Museum für moderne Kunst, Bremen, Germany, May 19, 2017–February 25, 2018. Photo: Björn Behrens

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Proof of Life

May 19, 2017–February 25, 2018
Weserburg | Museum für moderne Kunst, Bremen, Germany
www.weserburg.de

Proof of Life brings together one hundred paintings, sculptures, and photographic works that investigate existential questions in a manner both palpable and profound. Work by Damien Hirst, Thomas Houseago, Anselm Kiefer, Sterling Ruby, and Richard Serra is included.

Installation view, Proof of Life, Weserburg | Museum für moderne Kunst, Bremen, Germany, May 19, 2017–February 25, 2018. Photo: Björn Behrens

Film still from Richard Serra, Robert Bell, and Carlota Schoolman’s Prisoner’s Dilemma (1974)

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Richard Serra
Films and Videotapes

May 20–October 15, 2017
Kunstmuseum Basel
kunstmuseumbasel.ch

The exhibition turns the focus on Serra’s films and videotapes. Between 1968 and 1979, the artist produced fifteen films and videos. This is the first exhibition to present almost all that material, which runs to just over five hours, in the original formats.

Film still from Richard Serra, Robert Bell, and Carlota Schoolman’s Prisoner’s Dilemma (1974)

Richard Serra, Composite 1-1, 2016 © 2017 Richard Serra/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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Richard Serra
Drawings 2015–2017

June 24–September 24, 2017
Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam
www.boijmans.nl

This exhibition encompasses more than 110 works from five different series, many of which have never been seen before publicly, as well as a selection of notebooks.

Richard Serra, Composite 1-1, 2016 © 2017 Richard Serra/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Photo by Axel Schneider

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Primary Structures
Masterworks of Minimal Art

February 22–August 13, 2017
MMK2, Museum für Moderne Kunst Frankfurt am Main
mmk-frankfurt.de

The Minimal art current emerged in the US in the early 1960s, its exponents striving in their works for objectiveness, logic, and industrial production without artistic signature. The exhibition investigates the international impact of the influential Minimal art movement from the ’60s to the present. This show includes works by Richard Artschwager, Walter De Maria, Bruce Nauman, Steven Parrino, and Richard Serra.

Photo by Axel Schneider

Alberto Giacometti, Femme égorgée, 1932/40, Collection Centre Pompidou, Paris © Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti, Paris et ADAGP, Paris) 

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À pied d’oeuvre(s)

March 31–July 9, 2017
Monnaie de Paris
www.monnaiedeparis.fr

À pied d’oeuvre(s) examines the history of sculpture through three crucial moments. In 1917, Marcel Duchamp placed a coatrack on the ground and named it Trébuchet (Trap); in 1939, Alberto Giacometti showed a sculpture of a body of an injured woman lying on the floor; in 1960, Yves Klein removed one of his paintings from a wall and covered the space in gesso. These three masterpieces, rarely seen together, initiate a floor-level tour of the Centre Pompidou’s collections and synthesize three key moments from the history of twentieth-century sculpture: in doing so, they embody the exhibition’s aim. Work by Man Ray, Richard Serra, Tatiana Trouvé, and Rachel Whiteread is included.

Alberto Giacometti, Femme égorgée, 1932/40, Collection Centre Pompidou, Paris © Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti, Paris et ADAGP, Paris) 

Richard Serra, Prop, 1968/2007, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York © 2017 Richard Serra/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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Richard Serra
Props, Films, Early Works

March 17–June 18, 2017
Museum Wiesbaden, Germany
www.museum-wiesbaden.de

Designed in close cooperation with the artist, this exhibition presents Serra’s early Prop pieces along with his films from the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Richard Serra, Prop, 1968/2007, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York © 2017 Richard Serra/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Ed Ruscha, Made in California, 1971 © Ed Ruscha

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The American Dream
Pop to the Present

March 9–June 18, 2017
British Museum, London
americandreamexhibition.org

This exhibition traces the past six decades of American history through prints of unprecedented scale and ambition. Starting with the explosion of Pop art in the 1960s, the show includes works by many of America’s most celebrated artists. Works by Helen Frankenthaler, Roy Lichtenstein, Bruce Nauman, Ed Ruscha, Richard Serra, Cy Twombly, Andy Warhol, and Tom Wesselmann are on view.

Ed Ruscha, Made in California, 1971 © Ed Ruscha

Brice Marden, Untitled, 1988–91 © Brice Marden/Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York

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The Beginning of Everything
Drawings from the Janie C. Lee, Louisa Stude Sarofim, and David Whitney Collections

February 24–June 18, 2017
The Menil Collection, Houston
www.menil.org

In anticipation of the October 2017 opening of the Menil Drawing Institute, the museum is exhibiting a selection of drawings spanning the mid-nineteenth to the late twentieth century. The show highlights promised gifts from the collections of Janie C. Lee and Louisa Stude Sarofim, as well as works from David Whitney’s 2005 bequest, which include those by Balthus, Georg Baselitz, Helen Frankenthaler, Alberto Giacometti, Anselm Kiefer, Brice Marden, Bruce Nauman, Richard Serra, Cy Twombly, and Rachel Whiteread.

Brice Marden, Untitled, 1988–91 © Brice Marden/Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York

Andy Warhol, Flower, 1964 © 2017 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Therese Husby, courtesy Nasjonalmuseet 

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The Great Graphic Boom

March 3–May 28, 2017
Nasjonalmuseet, Oslo
www.nasjonalmuseet.no

This exhibition explores the intense interest in graphic art among many leading artists of the postwar art period. With works from twenty-five artists, including Helen Frankenthaler, Roy Lichtenstein, Brice Marden, Bruce Nauman, Ed Ruscha, Richard Serra, Cy Twombly, and Andy Warhol, the show highlights the use of graphic media both as a refined form of expression and as an important phase in the artistic process. The exhibition has been organized with support from Staatsgalerie Stuttgart, Germany.

Andy Warhol, Flower, 1964 © 2017 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Therese Husby, courtesy Nasjonalmuseet 

Richard Serra, Bo Diddley, 1999 © Richard Serra/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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Richard Serra
Prints

January 28–April 30, 2017
Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas
www.nashersculpturecenter.org

From the collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and his Family Foundation, Richard Serra: Prints features the artist’s earliest printed works alongside more recent pieces.

Richard Serra, Bo Diddley, 1999 © Richard Serra/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York