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Jeff Wall, Approach, 2014 © Jeff Wall

Opening this Week

Jeff Wall in
Actual Size! Photography at Life Scale

January 28–May 2, 2022
International Center of Photography, New York
www.icp.org

In 1946, the renowned writer Jorge Luis Borges described a society that wanted a map of its land so detailed that it eventually covered the land itself. Actual Size! is an homage to Borges’s wild but serious idea, showing us new ways to consider what a photograph is, and what it can be. The exhibition, which offers viewers a diverse group of images that all share the same dimension as life itself, is a rethinking of the fundamental qualities of this perplexing and elastic medium. Work by Jeff Wall is included.

Jeff Wall, Approach, 2014 © Jeff Wall

Installation view, Katharina Grosse: Chill Seeping from the Walls Gets between Us, Helsinki Art Museum, June 8, 2021–January 23, 2022. Artwork © Katharina Grosse and VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, Germany 2021. Photo: Hanna Kukorelli/HAM Helsinki Art Museum

Closing this Week

Katharina Grosse
Chill Seeping from the Walls Gets between Us

Through January 23, 2022
Helsinki Art Museum
www.hamhelsinki.fi

Katharina Grosse is taking over the main exhibition halls on the museum’s upper level with two new installations, one of which has been painted on-site. Focusing on painting as a process and intervention, she transforms the exhibition spaces into artworks engaging in an active correspondence with the architecture, where visitors become participants as they move through her boldly colored installations.

Installation view, Katharina Grosse: Chill Seeping from the Walls Gets between Us, Helsinki Art Museum, June 8, 2021–January 23, 2022. Artwork © Katharina Grosse and VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, Germany 2021. Photo: Hanna Kukorelli/HAM Helsinki Art Museum

Installation view, Giuseppe Penone: Sève et pensée, Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris, October 12, 2021–January 23, 2022. Artwork © ADAGP, Paris, 2021. Photo: Archivio Penone

Closing this Week

Giuseppe Penone
Sève et pensée

Through January 23, 2022
Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris
www.bnf.fr

Sève et pensée (Sap and Thought), an exhibition at the Bibliothèque nationale de France’s François-Mitterand location, centers on Giuseppe Penone’s spectacular installation Pensieri e linfa (Sap and Thought) (2021), produced especially for the site, which features a frottage rubbing of a 30-meter-long acacia tree trunk on a length of canvas. Handwritten text by the artist runs along both sides of the imprint. Also included are previously unseen works, drawings, photographs, and books, as well as a series of eighteen recent prints that Penone has gifted to the library.

Installation view, Giuseppe Penone: Sève et pensée, Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris, October 12, 2021–January 23, 2022. Artwork © ADAGP, Paris, 2021. Photo: Archivio Penone

Alberto Giacometti, L’objet invisible, 1934–35 © Succession Alberto Giacometti (ADAGP + Fondation Giacometti), 2022

Just Opened

Alberto Giacometti–André Breton
Amitiés surréalistes

Through April 10, 2022
Institut Giacometti, Paris
www.fondation-giacometti.fr

From 1930 to 1935, Alberto Giacometti spent time within the Surrealist group, where he established lasting friendships with André Breton and other artists and intellectuals of the movement. This exhibition, whose title translates to Surrealist Friendships, brings together several emblematic works from that period by Giacometti as well as works by Salvador Dalí, Man Ray, Meret Oppenheim, Pablo Picasso, and others.

Alberto Giacometti, L’objet invisible, 1934–35 © Succession Alberto Giacometti (ADAGP + Fondation Giacometti), 2022

Installation view, Urs Fischer, Bourse de Commerce, Paris, May 22, 2021–January 29, 2022. Artwork © Urs Fischer

On View

Urs Fischer

Through January 29, 2022
Bourse de Commerce, Paris
www.pinaultcollection.com

Urs Fischer’s Untitled (2011) is being presented in the rotunda of the newly renovated Bourse de Commerce. Fischer has reconceived the sculpture to suit the scale of the space, whose Belle Epoque architecture has been redesigned by architect Tadao Ando. The work consists of a group of larger-than-life candles—replicas of Giambologna’s sixteenth-century Mannerist masterpiece The Rape of the Sabine Women; Fischer’s longtime friend, artist Rudolf Stingel; and an assortment of chairs—that are lit and melt down over the course of the exhibition.

Installation view, Urs Fischer, Bourse de Commerce, Paris, May 22, 2021–January 29, 2022. Artwork © Urs Fischer

Sally Mann, Georgia, Untitled (Beaver Log), 1996 © Sally Mann

On View

Sally Mann in
Picturing the South: 25 Years

Through February 6, 2022
High Museum of Art, Atlanta
high.org

In 1996, the High Museum of Art began commissioning photographers from around the world to engage with and explore the rich social and geographic landscape of the American South for its Picturing the South initiative. Organized on the occasion of the project’s twenty-fifth anniversary, this exhibition brings together all of the commissions for the first time. Taken as a whole, the photographs amount to a complex and layered archive of the region that addresses broad themes, including racial justice, the legacy of slavery, the social implications of the evolving landscape, and the distinct and diverse character of the region’s people. Work by Sally Mann is included.

Sally Mann, Georgia, Untitled (Beaver Log), 1996 © Sally Mann

Alexander Calder, Têtes et queue, 1965, installation view, Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin © 2021 Calder Foundation, New York/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Stephanie von Becker

On View

Alexander Calder
Minimal/Maximal

Through February 13, 2022
Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin
www.smb.museum

This exhibition traces the unique relationship between size, scale, and spatiality in Alexander Calder’s works, while juxtaposing his organic forms with the strict geometry of Mies van der Rohe’s building in a poetic dialogue. Calder’s outdoor sculpture Têtes et queue (1965), which was originally installed at the museum’s inauguration, now returns to its terrace.

Alexander Calder, Têtes et queue, 1965, installation view, Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin © 2021 Calder Foundation, New York/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Stephanie von Becker

Gregory Crewdson, Untitled, 1998–2002 © Gregory Crewdson

On View

Gregory Crewdson in
Colección Jumex: Temperatura Ambiente

Through February 13, 2022
Museo Jumex, Mexico City
www.fundacionjumex.org

This exhibition, whose title translates to Ambient Temperature, presents thirty-five works from the museum’s collection with the aim of creating a journey from the suffocating heat of the desert to the air-conditioned, impersonal spaces of contemporary life. Through videos, photographs, installations, and sculptures by international artists, the exhibition considers heat poetically—how it travels through the body, affecting experiences and emotions—against the backdrop of global climate change. Work by Gregory Crewdson is included.

Gregory Crewdson, Untitled, 1998–2002 © Gregory Crewdson

Gregory Crewdson, Untitled, 2003–08 © Gregory Crewdson

On View

Gregory Crewdson in
True Pictures?: Zeitgenössische Fotografie aus Kanada und den USA

Through February 13, 2022
Sprengel Museum Hannover, Germany
www.sprengel-museum.de

This group exhibition, whose subtitle translates to Contemporary Photography from Canada and the USA, presents work by more than thirty North American artists spanning three generations whose photography is informed by our digital age—both through their employment of digital technologies and in terms of their engagement with the “flood of images” that defines visual culture of the twenty-first century. Work by Gregory Crewdson is included.

Gregory Crewdson, Untitled, 2003–08 © Gregory Crewdson

Installation view, Andreas Gursky, Museum Küppersmühle für Moderne Kunst, Duisburg, Germany, September 9, 2021–January 30, 2022. Artwork © Andreas Gursky/VG-Bild-Kunst, Bonn, Germany 2021. Photo: Inga Barnick, Installationsansichten MKM, 2021

On View

Andreas Gursky

Through February 13, 2022
Museum Küppersmühle für Moderne Kunst, Duisburg, Germany
museum-kueppersmuehle.de

This monographic exhibition of Andreas Gursky’s work includes nearly sixty photographs spanning four decades, starting with early works from the Ruhr region in Germany, which Gursky often used as a setting during his studies with Bernd and Hilla Becher at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf. Also included are well-known iconographic images and large-format photographs that provide a comprehensive overview of the artist’s practice.

Installation view, Andreas Gursky, Museum Küppersmühle für Moderne Kunst, Duisburg, Germany, September 9, 2021–January 30, 2022. Artwork © Andreas Gursky/VG-Bild-Kunst, Bonn, Germany 2021. Photo: Inga Barnick, Installationsansichten MKM, 2021

Alex Israel, Self-Portrait (TikTok), 2021, K11 Collection © Alex Israel

On View

Alex Israel
Freeway

Through February 15, 2022
Fosun Foundation, Shanghai
www.fosunfoundation.com

Freeway features Alex Israel’s interpretations of the iconic Los Angeles motifs of sunshine, waves, and the sky, informed by his unique perspective on mass media and popular culture through the lens of his multiple identities as artist, entrepreneur, filmmaker, and talk-show host. This survey exhibition, covering the past decade of the artist’s career, includes works in a range of mediums, and is the first time that Israel’s Self-Portrait and Sky Backdrop series have been presented in China.

Alex Israel, Self-Portrait (TikTok), 2021, K11 Collection © Alex Israel

Walter De Maria, The 2000 Sculpture, 1992 © Estate of Walter De Maria. Photo: Franca Candrian, Kunsthaus Zürich

On View

Walter De Maria
The 2000 Sculpture

Through February 20, 2022
Kunsthaus Zürich
www.kunsthaus.ch

Walter De Maria’s The 2000 Sculpture (1992) comprises a total of two thousand white plaster rods each 50 centimeters long and varying between 11.8 and 12 centimeters tall. The individual elements have five, seven, or nine sides. Following a specific rhythm, they are arranged on a surface covering 500 square meters, in a total of twenty rows each with one hundred rods. The result is a kind of herringbone pattern, with the rods seeming to move toward or away from the viewer, depending on where he or she stands. This creates a tension between predictable regularity and individual perception that is underscored by the light and space surrounding the arrangement.

Walter De Maria, The 2000 Sculpture, 1992 © Estate of Walter De Maria. Photo: Franca Candrian, Kunsthaus Zürich

Helen Frankenthaler, Untitled, 1967, Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Chiron Press, New York

On View

Without Limits
Helen Frankenthaler, Abstraction, and the Language of Print

Through February 20, 2022
Blanton Museum of Art, University of Texas at Austin
blantonmuseum.org

Without Limits celebrates the generous gift from the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation to the Blanton Museum of Art of ten prints and six proofs that span five decades of the artist’s career. Frankenthaler began creating prints in 1961, approaching lithography, screen printing, etching, and woodcut printing with curiosity and vision. Collaborating with master printmakers at studios such as Universal Limited Art Editions (ulae), Mixografia, and Tyler Graphics, Ltd., she contributed to a printmaking renaissance in the mid-twentieth century. Her work is presented alongside prints by other artists in the Blanton’s collection who also use the medium to capture and translate their own abstract visions.

Helen Frankenthaler, Untitled, 1967, Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Chiron Press, New York

Installation view, Making Knowing: Craft in Art, 1950–2019, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, November 22, 2019–February 20, 2022. Artwork, left to right: © Claes Oldenburg; © Yayoi Kusama; © 2022 The Estate of Richard Artschwager/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Ron Amstutz

On View

Making Knowing
Craft in Art, 1950–2019

Through February 20, 2022
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
whitney.org

Making Knowing: Craft in Art, 1950–2019 foregrounds how visual artists have explored the materials, methods, and strategies of craft over the past seven decades. Some expand techniques with long histories, such as weaving, sewing, or pottery, while others experiment with clay, beads, and glass, among other mediums. Work by Richard Artschwager, Mike Kelley, and Sterling Ruby is included.

Installation view, Making Knowing: Craft in Art, 1950–2019, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, November 22, 2019–February 20, 2022. Artwork, left to right: © Claes Oldenburg; © Yayoi Kusama; © 2022 The Estate of Richard Artschwager/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Ron Amstutz

Albert Oehlen, Untitled, 1997/2005 © Albert Oehlen. Photo: Lothar Schnepf

On View

Albert Oehlen
“Grandi quadri miei con piccoli quadri di altri”

Through February 20, 2022
Museo d’arte della Svizzera italiana, Lugano, Switzerland
masilugano.ch

In this exhibition, Albert Oehlen: Big Paintings by Me with Small Paintings by Others”, select works from Oehlen’s personal art collection are on view alongside some of his most significant paintings. In staging this large-scale exhibition, Oehlen aims to make relationships perceptible between his artworks and those by artists whose practices he has long admired. Work by Richard Artschwager, Willem de Kooning, Duane Hanson, Mike Kelley, and Franz West, among others, is included.

Albert Oehlen, Untitled, 1997/2005 © Albert Oehlen. Photo: Lothar Schnepf

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Mama in Fall, 2017, Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles © Nathaniel Mary Quinn

On View

Nathaniel Mary Quinn in
Evidence: Selections from the Permanent Collection

Through February 20, 2022
Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles
www.moca.org

Our experience of time is situational and decidedly elastic, a reality that many of us have perceived with new acuity over the course of the COVID-19 pandemic in ways intimately related to our differing responsibilities and stations in life. This selection of works from the collection of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, considers some of the myriad ways that artists mark, capture, or meditate on the passage of time: its duration, its ordering into past and present, and its relation to memory. Work by Nathaniel Mary Quinn is included.

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Mama in Fall, 2017, Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles © Nathaniel Mary Quinn

Sterling Ruby, SP132, 2010 © Sterling Ruby. Photo: Robert Wedemeyer

On View

Sterling Ruby in
Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams

Through February 20, 2022
Brooklyn Museum, New York
www.brooklynmuseum.org

This exhibition traces the groundbreaking history and legacy of the House of Dior, bringing to life Dior’s many sources of inspiration, from the splendor of flowers and other natural forms to classical and contemporary art. With objects drawn primarily from the Dior archives, it includes over two hundred haute couture garments as well as photographs, archival videos, sketches, vintage perfume elements, accessories, and works from the museum’s collection. Work by Sterling Ruby is included.

Sterling Ruby, SP132, 2010 © Sterling Ruby. Photo: Robert Wedemeyer

Jenny Saville, Study for the Eyes of Argus, 2021 (detail) © Jenny Saville. All rights reserved, DACS 2021. Photo: Prudence Cuming Associates

On View

Jenny Saville

Through February 20, 2022
Various venues in Florence, Italy
www.museonovecento.it

Jenny Saville is the subject of an exhibition project conceived and curated by Sergio Risaliti, director of the Museo Novecento, in collaboration with four other major museums in Florence: Museo di Palazzo Vecchio, Museo dell’Opera del Duomo, Museo degli Innocenti, and Museo di Casa Buonarroti. The multipart exhibition places Saville’s paintings and drawings in dialogue with masterworks of the Italian Renaissance, including some of Michelangelo’s greatest masterpieces, offering a revealing encounter between the contemporary and the historical. Correspondences include the monumentality of Saville’s paintings—a distinctive feature of her figurative language since her early career—as well as her research focused on the body and flesh of her naked subjects. 

Jenny Saville, Study for the Eyes of Argus, 2021 (detail) © Jenny Saville. All rights reserved, DACS 2021. Photo: Prudence Cuming Associates

Andy Warhol, Dolly Parton and Keith Haring, 1985 © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. Licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

On View

Andy Warhol
Photo Factory

Through February 20, 2022
Fotografiska, New York
www.fotografiska.com

Photo Factory presents some of Andy Warhol’s earliest photographic works, offering a glimpse into his experimentation with the medium and how it served as a catalyst for his early silkscreen paintings, commissioned portraits, and commercial work. The exhibition features Polaroids of celebrities, artists, and friends; lesser-seen unique gelatin silver prints; Polaroid collages; 16mm film Screen Tests from the mid-1960s; and stitched photographs from Warhol’s final exhibition in 1987.

Andy Warhol, Dolly Parton and Keith Haring, 1985 © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. Licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Louise Bonnet, Pissing Gorgon, 2021 © Louise Bonnet

On View

Louise Bonnet in
Stretching the Body

Through February 27, 2022
Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin, Italy
fsrr.org

Stretching the Body brings together the work of thirteen women artists from different generations and geographical origins who, through painting, reflect on the genre of portraiture and the theme of the human figure. Work by Louise Bonnet is included.

Louise Bonnet, Pissing Gorgon, 2021 © Louise Bonnet

Helen Frankenthaler, Stella Polaris, 1990 © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

On View

Helen Frankenthaler
Late Works, 1990–2003

Through February 27, 2022
Palm Springs Art Museum, California
www.psmuseum.org

Marking the first museum presentation dedicated to the late work of Helen Frankenthaler, this exhibition features ten paintings and twenty works on paper dating from 1990 to 2003, some measuring more than six feet. Through her invention of the soak-stain technique, Frankenthaler expanded the possibilities of abstract painting while referencing figuration and landscape in unique ways. In later years, her practice continued to evolve through her use of diverse media and processes, as she shifted from painting canvas on the floor to using larger sheets of paper that were laid out on the floor or on tabletops for easier accessibility. The continuity, in terms of content and execution, between the late work (post-1990) and what came before is striking. Graced with memorable encounters, a vast art historical image bank, and technical prowess, the aging artist moved in whatever direction suited her mood and imagination. This exhibition originated at the New Britain Museum of American Art in Connecticut.

Helen Frankenthaler, Stella Polaris, 1990 © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Giuseppe Penone, Vaso, 1986, installation view, Villa Medici–Académie de France à Rome © Giuseppe Penone/2021 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris. Photo: © Daniele Molajoli/AFR–Villa Medici

On View

Giuseppe Penone
Art Club #34

Through February 27, 2022
Villa Medici–Académie de France à Rome
www.villamedici.it

As part of its Art Club exhibition series curated by Pier Paolo Pancotto, nine works by Giuseppe Penone are on view at Villa Medici in Rome, including five sculptures in terra-cotta and bronze and a video. In the exhibition, conceived for the private rooms of Cardinal Ferdinando de Medici, Penone aims to highlight the singularity of these intimate spaces by presenting emblematic works that question the material and the concept of sculpture.

Giuseppe Penone, Vaso, 1986, installation view, Villa Medici–Académie de France à Rome © Giuseppe Penone/2021 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris. Photo: © Daniele Molajoli/AFR–Villa Medici

Carsten Höller, Divisions (Turquoise Lines and Pink Circles), 2014 © Carsten Höller

On View

Carsten Höller
Day

Through February 28, 2022
Museu de Arte, Arquitetura e Tecnologia, Lisbon
www.maat.pt

Carsten Höller: Day brings together an array of works producing light and darkness, including sculptures that function as lamps, projections, and architectural interventions, dating from 1987, when Höller was working as a scientist, to today. More than twenty works, many re-created especially for this show, unfold across the museum in an arrangement that creates a dialogue with the museum’s architecture. The exhibition space is illuminated exclusively by Höller’s art, leading audiences through multi-sensorial experiences of altered perception.

Carsten Höller, Divisions (Turquoise Lines and Pink Circles), 2014 © Carsten Höller

Ellen Gallagher, Watery Ecstatic, 2019 © Ellen Gallagher

On View

Ellen Gallagher in
To Be Like Water

Through March 6, 2022
TENT Rotterdam, Netherlands
www.tentrotterdam.nl

To Be Like Water explores and expands on the meaning of code-switching—a term used in linguistics to denote the practice of alternating between multiple languages in conversation—which now also commonly refers to adjusting one’s behaviors to optimize the comfort of others. The exhibition aims to examine and complicate the notion of identity, and consider code-switching as a manifestation of a fluid multiplicity that operates within vectors of power. Work by Ellen Gallagher is included.

Ellen Gallagher, Watery Ecstatic, 2019 © Ellen Gallagher