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Gagosian Quarterly

October 23, 2017

William Forsythe:Choreographic Objects

Celebrated choreographer William Forsythe has been expanding the boundaries of dance for over four decades. In 1989 he began work on his “choreographic objects,” a series of sculptural installations. These physical, object-based extensions of his choreographic practice have become an integral aspect of his work. An exhibition at Gagosian Le Bourget in Paris continues this experimentation with three works: Black Flags, Alignigung II, and Towards the Diagnostic Gaze (Paris). Filmmaker Ulrike Stumpp created a video documenting these works that includes an in-depth interview with Forsythe about the concepts and techniques underlying the exhibition.

Video © Gagosian. Artwork © William Forsythe. Directed by Ulrike Stumpp; Edit and Post Production by Stefan Knauer. Interview by Louise Neri. Camera: Ulrike Stumpp, Dennis Westenberger, Stefan Knauer

William Forsythe

William Forsythe

The world-renowned choreographer discusses his mindful objects with Louise Neri.

Huma Bhabha during the installation of Huma Bhabha: The Company at Gagosian, Rome, September 2019.

Work in Progress
Huma Bhabha

The artist tells Negar Azimi about her interest in the monstrous, the influence of science fiction on her practice, and her recent rooftop commission at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Artist Nam June Paik writing on his typewriter in black and white photo.

Reading Nam June Paik

Earlier this year, MIT Press released We Are in Open Circuits: Writings by Nam June Paik. Here Gregory Zinman, coeditor of the book along with John Hanhardt and Edith Decker-Phillips, writes about his first exposure to the artist’s archives, the discoveries made there, and the relationship between Paik’s writings and his larger practice.

Before the Smoke Has Cleared

Before the Smoke Has Cleared

Angela Brown provides a glimpse into the charged ecologies of recent drawings and sculptures by Tatiana Trouvé. These works will be included in On the Eve of Never Leaving, Trouvé’s first solo exhibition in Los Angeles, opening in November 2019.

Jerry Schatzberg, Self Portrait in the Mirror, Trinidad, 1964.

The Center of the Storm

Carlos Valladares writes on filmmaker and photographer Jerry Schatzberg’s prolific career.

Helen Frankenthaler, Riverhead, 1963 (detail).

Frankenthaler

On the occasion of the exhibition Pittura/Panorama: Paintings by Helen Frankenthaler, 1952–1992, at the Museo di Palazzo Grimani in Venice, Italy, art historians John Elderfield and Pepe Karmel discuss the concept of the panorama in relation to the artist’s work. Their conversation traces developments in Frankenthaler’s approach to composition, the boundaries and conventions of abstraction, and how, in many ways, her career continually challenged established theories of art history.

Sarah Sze, Dews Drew (Half-life), 2018.

Sarah Sze: Infinite Generation

Louise Neri talks with Sarah Sze about the new primacy of the image in her explorations between and across mediums. They spoke on the occasion of an exhibition of Sze’s work at Gagosian, Rome, comprising collaged panel paintings, a large-scale video installation, and an outdoor sculpture fashioned from a natural boulder.

Installation view, Urs Fischer: PLAY with choreography by Madeline Hollander, Gagosian, West 21st Street, New York, September 6–October 13, 2018.

Play

Urs Fischer and choreographer Madeline Hollander speak with novelist Natasha Stagg about the ways in which choreographic experimentation and an interest in our ability to project emotion onto objects led to the one-of-a-kind project PLAY.

Video still of Sarah Sze speaking at a TED conference, Vancouver, BC, April 2019.

Sarah Sze: Art That Explores Time and Memory

Join Sarah Sze as she talks about the questions that drive her work. She describes creating immersive experiences that blur the lines between time, memory, and space—and between art and life.

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Brooklyn, New York, 2019.

Nathaniel Mary Quinn

Anderson Cooper spoke with the artist at his Brooklyn studio about his childhood and the visionary nature of his art.

Billy Martin.

Digital Pompeii

Guitarist and legendary composer Marc Ribot and acclaimed percussionist Billy Martin speak with Brett Littman, the director of the Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum, about how they met, New York in the 1980s, and the way the visual arts have informed their music.

Nina Simone at the Globe Jazz festival at Symphony Hall, Boston, March 20, 1986.

Nina Simone, Our National Treasure

Text by Salamishah Tillet.