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Gagosian Quarterly

October 23, 2017

William Forsythe:Choreographic Objects

Celebrated choreographer William Forsythe has been expanding the boundaries of dance for over four decades. In 1989 he began work on his “choreographic objects,” a series of sculptural installations. These physical, object-based extensions of his choreographic practice have become an integral aspect of his work. An exhibition at Gagosian Le Bourget in Paris continues this experimentation with three works: Black Flags, Alignigung II, and Towards the Diagnostic Gaze (Paris). Filmmaker Ulrike Stumpp created a video documenting these works that includes an in-depth interview with Forsythe about the concepts and techniques underlying the exhibition.

Video © Gagosian. Artwork © William Forsythe. Directed by Ulrike Stumpp; Edit and Post Production by Stefan Knauer. Interview by Louise Neri. Camera: Ulrike Stumpp, Dennis Westenberger, Stefan Knauer

William Forsythe

William Forsythe

The world-renowned choreographer discusses his mindful objects with Louise Neri.

Marc Newson, London, 2018.

In Conversation
Marc Newson and Derek Blasberg

Marc Newson tells Derek Blasberg about his newest creations, explaining the backstory of these ornate works.

Andy Warhol: Everything Is Good

Andy Warhol: Everything Is Good

Richard Hell writes about the “transcendentally camp” Pop artist, portraitist of daily life.

Roy Lichtenstein: 1961 to 1965

Roy Lichtenstein: 1961 to 1965

Gillian Pistell examines Roy Lichtenstein’s aesthetic developments in the years 1961 to 1965.

Zeng Fanzhi on Cézanne, Morandi, and Sanyu

Zeng Fanzhi on Cézanne, Morandi, and Sanyu

Zeng Fanzhi speaks about curating the exhibition Cézanne, Morandi, and Sanyu at Gagosian, Hong Kong, and the connections between the three artists’ works. Interview by Jin Jing.

View of the south front of Kenwood House.

Kenwood House

Anna Eavis, the curatorial director of English Heritage, traces the history of Kenwood House and details the remarkable collection of paintings that reside there.

Uncharted Territory

Uncharted Territory

For the 16th International Architecture Biennale in Venice, the architectural firm Caruso St John teamed up with artist Marcus Taylor to curate the British Pavilion. Their design, Island, offers a profound adjustment of public space at a moment of profound geopolitical change. James Lawrence considers its implications.

Steven Parrino: Natures Mortes Vivantes

Steven Parrino: Natures Mortes Vivantes

Vincent Pécoil reflects on Steven Parrino’s “deformalized” canvases as specters of abstraction and disruptions of painting’s status quo.

Romuald Hazoumè

Romuald Hazoumè

Romuald Hazoumè’s masks are deeply rooted in the cultural, social, and political context of Benin. His masks, which use salvaged materials and bidons, or plastic jerry cans, comment on pan-African politics and culture. Text by André Magnin.

Before and After the Fall

Before and After the Fall

Richard Calvocoressi examines the trajectory of pre- and postwar German and Austrian art from the 1930s through the mid-1950s, revealing how the events leading up to and following World War II affected this generation of artists.

Piero Golia: Intermission Paintings

Piero Golia: Intermission Paintings

Andrew Berardini reflects on Piero Golia’s Intermission Paintings, relics from the first phase of the artist’s three-part sculptural performance The Comedy of Craft.

Sterling Ruby: Bloody Pots

Sterling Ruby: Bloody Pots

Ceramics expert Garth Clark explores Sterling Ruby’s practice in the medium, addressing the work’s allegiances and divergences from tradition.