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Richard Serra

Rolled and Forged

May 6–August 11, 2006
555 West 24th Street, New York

Richard Serra, Elevations, Repetitions, 2006 (view 1) Weatherproof steel, 60 × 366 × 6 inches (152.4 × 929.6 × 15.2 cm)

Richard Serra, Elevations, Repetitions, 2006 (view 1)

Weatherproof steel, 60 × 366 × 6 inches (152.4 × 929.6 × 15.2 cm)

Richard Serra, Elevations, Repetitions, 2006 (view 2) Weatherproof steel, 60 × 366 × 6 inches (152.4 × 929.6 × 15.2 cm)

Richard Serra, Elevations, Repetitions, 2006 (view 2)

Weatherproof steel, 60 × 366 × 6 inches (152.4 × 929.6 × 15.2 cm)

Richard Serra, Equal Weights and Measures, 2006 Forged weatherproof steel, 51 × 63 × 75 inches each (129.5 × 160 × 190.5 cm)

Richard Serra, Equal Weights and Measures, 2006

Forged weatherproof steel, 51 × 63 × 75 inches each (129.5 × 160 × 190.5 cm)

Richard Serra, No Relief, 2006 Weatherproof steel, 1 @ 72 × 716 × 6 inches (82.9 × 1818.6 × 15.2 cm), 1 @ 57 × 716 × 6 inches (144.8 × 1818.6 × 15.2 cm)

Richard Serra, No Relief, 2006

Weatherproof steel, 1 @ 72 × 716 × 6 inches (82.9 × 1818.6 × 15.2 cm), 1 @ 57 × 716 × 6 inches (144.8 × 1818.6 × 15.2 cm)

About

Gagosian is pleased to present five new sculptures by Richard Serra.

Amongst Elevations, 2006, weatherproof steel
Round, 1997, forged weatherproof steel
Equal Weights and Measures, 2006, forged weatherproof steel
No Relief, 2006, weatherproof steel
Elevational Mass, 2006, hot rolled steel

Weight is a value for me, not that it is any more compelling than lightness, but I simply know more about weight than lightness and therefore I have more to say about it, more to say about the balancing of weight, the diminishing of weight, the addition and subtraction of weight, the concentration of weight, the rigging of weight, the propping of weight, the placement of weight, the locking of weight, the psychological effects of weight, the disorientation of weight, the disequilibrium of weight, the rotation of weight, the movement of weight, the directionality of weight, the shape of weight. I have more to say about the perpetual and meticulous adjustments of weight, more to say about the pleasure derived from the exactitude of the laws of gravity. I have more to say about the processing of the weight of steel, more to say about the forge, the rolling mill, and the open hearth. 
—Richard Serra

Serra’s rolled, planar works are concerned with division, elevation, and passage, whereas the forged works deal primarily with weight, density, and mass. Serra’s desire to involve the viewer with his work parallels his desire to create works that respond to a specific site. His large indoor installations are built within the context of the architecture, their scale and placement determined by the size and shape of the room and by the limitations of weight load and access to space. The massive steel structures alter and reshape one’s perception of space. As only parts of these works can be seen from any one vantage point, they require that time be spent walking, looking, anticipating, and remembering. As the viewer moves in, around, and through them, they change configuration with every step. Their meaning unfolds through one’s constantly changing physical experience of them and the space that they occupy.