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Julian Schnabel

View of Dawn in the Tropics: Paintings, 1989–1990

April 17–May 31, 2014
West 24th Street, New York

Installation view © 2014 Julian Schnabel/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view

© 2014 Julian Schnabel/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view © 2014 Julian Schnabel/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view

© 2014 Julian Schnabel/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view © 2014 Julian Schnabel/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view

© 2014 Julian Schnabel/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view © 2014 Julian Schnabel/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view

© 2014 Julian Schnabel/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view © 2014 Julian Schnabel/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view

© 2014 Julian Schnabel/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view © 2014 Julian Schnabel/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York Photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view

© 2014 Julian Schnabel/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York Photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view © 2014 Julian Schnabel/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view

© 2014 Julian Schnabel/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, photo by Rob McKeever

Works Exhibited

Julian Schnabel, Untitled, 1990 Resin, gesso on burlap, 120 × 108 inches (304.8 × 274.3 cm)Photo by Ken Cohen Photography

Julian Schnabel, Untitled, 1990

Resin, gesso on burlap, 120 × 108 inches (304.8 × 274.3 cm)
Photo by Ken Cohen Photography

Julian Schnabel, Untitled, 1990 Resin, gesso on burlap, 120 × 108 inches (304.8 × 274.3 cm)Photo by Ken Cohen Photography

Julian Schnabel, Untitled, 1990

Resin, gesso on burlap, 120 × 108 inches (304.8 × 274.3 cm)
Photo by Ken Cohen Photography

Julian Schnabel, Untitled, 1990 Resin, gesso on burlap, 120 × 108 inches (304.8 × 274.3 cm)Photo by Ken Cohen Photography

Julian Schnabel, Untitled, 1990

Resin, gesso on burlap, 120 × 108 inches (304.8 × 274.3 cm)
Photo by Ken Cohen Photography

Julian Schnabel, A Little Later, 1990 Oil, gesso on white tarp, 96 × 76 inches (243.8 × 193 cm)Photo by Rob McKeever

Julian Schnabel, A Little Later, 1990

Oil, gesso on white tarp, 96 × 76 inches (243.8 × 193 cm)
Photo by Rob McKeever

About

A lot of what I do is about being in the moment…The residue of what happens; that's what's in the paintings.
—Julian Schnabel

Gagosian is pleased to present “View of Dawn in the Tropics: Paintings, 1989–1990,” an exhibition of paintings by Julian Schnabel that are being shown in New York for the first time, twenty-five years after they were made.

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, Schnabel approached painting as an act as susceptible to chance and circumstance as life itself. Working in the wake of American antecedents such as Robert Rauschenberg and Cy Twombly—who brought a certain sense of freedom to bear on their evident romance with European art and aesthetics—Schnabel made audaciously scaled paintings and sculptures whose richly hybrid sources were expressed in an attitude of baroque excess combined with improvisational daring. Broken plates, Kabuki theater backdrops, tarpaulins and boxing mats; thickly applied oil paint, collage, viscous resin, and flat digital reproduction; fragments of text in different languages: these are just some of the diverse materials with which Schnabel engages life's grand themes—sexuality, obsession, suffering, redemption, death, and belief.

For Paintings With and Without Bingo and Ozymandias, executed en plein air on the site of a ruined neoclassical building during a sojourn in Florida, Schnabel used old tarpaulins, sailcloth, and rolls of velvet as grounds on which to render reflections of his immediate surroundings subject to uncontrollable forces, from tropical storms to his dog Bingo's seemingly random but deliberate paw prints. These paintings, and others made in similarly unorthodox conditions in Montauk and San Sebastian, reveal an individualistic interplay between site and mark-making, both intentional and incidental, that eschews pictorial hierarchies of authorship, subject, and style.

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