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Richard Serra

Rifts

April 6–May 25, 2018
Grosvenor Hill, London

Installation video

Installation video

Installation view Artwork © Richard Serra/DACS, London, 2018. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view

Artwork © Richard Serra/DACS, London, 2018. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view Artwork © Richard Serra/DACS, London, 2018. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view

Artwork © Richard Serra/DACS, London, 2018. Photo: Mike Bruce

Works Exhibited

Richard Serra, Triple Rift #3, 2018 Paintstick on handmade Japanese paper, 9 feet 3 inches × 22 feet (2.82 × 6.71 m)© Richard Serra/DACS, London, 2018. Photo: Rob McKeever

Richard Serra, Triple Rift #3, 2018

Paintstick on handmade Japanese paper, 9 feet 3 inches × 22 feet (2.82 × 6.71 m)
© Richard Serra/DACS, London, 2018. Photo: Rob McKeever

Richard Serra, Quadruple Rift, 2017 Paintstick on handmade Japanese paper, 9 feet 2 inches × 26 feet 10 inches (2.79 × 8.17 m)The Menil Collection, Houston, Purchased with funds provided by Louisa Stude Sarofim© Richard Serra/DACS, London, 2018. Photo: Rob McKeever

Richard Serra, Quadruple Rift, 2017

Paintstick on handmade Japanese paper, 9 feet 2 inches × 26 feet 10 inches (2.79 × 8.17 m)
The Menil Collection, Houston, Purchased with funds provided by Louisa Stude Sarofim
© Richard Serra/DACS, London, 2018. Photo: Rob McKeever

About

I use black because it is a color that doesn’t transport elusive emotions.
—Richard Serra

Gagosian is pleased to present Rifts, an exhibition of recent drawings by Richard Serra.

The Rifts get their name from the distinctive white shapes—elongated triangles—that punctuate their otherwise unrelenting tarmac blackness, and perhaps from the geological term for a rent in the earth’s surface caused by moving tectonic plates. These sharp-edged triangular rifts are negative shapes, the white of the blank paper. An invention in drawing but one demanding their own rigor, they happen at the junction of two sheets of paper.

The stringent intelligible structures of the Rift Drawings obstruct us from seeing their white divisions expressively as other kinds of rupture—psychological, historical, ontological. Yet minimal metaphors of drawing remain: tension, balance, presence, space. The imposing scale and gross materiality of the Rifts hover just long enough on this border, perhaps, to make us more conscious of the operations of metaphor in our relationship to drawing.

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Press

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Erica Bolton
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Dennis Chang
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Zosia Gamgee
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From the Quarterly