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Cecily Brown

Cecily Brown, Untitled, 1996 Oil on board, 24 × 18 inches (61 × 45.7 cm)© Cecily Brown

Cecily Brown, Untitled, 1996

Oil on board, 24 × 18 inches (61 × 45.7 cm)
© Cecily Brown

Cecily Brown, Seven Brides for Seven Brothers, 1997–98 Oil on linen, 76 × 98 inches (193 × 248.9 cm)© Cecily Brown

Cecily Brown, Seven Brides for Seven Brothers, 1997–98

Oil on linen, 76 × 98 inches (193 × 248.9 cm)
© Cecily Brown

Cecily Brown, The Tender Trap II, 1998 Oil on linen, 76 × 98 ¼ inches (193 × 249.5 cm)© Cecily Brown

Cecily Brown, The Tender Trap II, 1998

Oil on linen, 76 × 98 ¼ inches (193 × 249.5 cm)
© Cecily Brown

Cecily Brown, Tender Is the Night, 1999 Oil on linen, 100 × 110 inches (254 × 279.4 cm), The Broad, Los Angeles© Cecily Brown

Cecily Brown, Tender Is the Night, 1999

Oil on linen, 100 × 110 inches (254 × 279.4 cm), The Broad, Los Angeles
© Cecily Brown

Cecily Brown, Performance, 1999 Oil on linen, 100 × 110 inches (254 × 279.4 cm)© Cecily Brown

Cecily Brown, Performance, 1999

Oil on linen, 100 × 110 inches (254 × 279.4 cm)
© Cecily Brown

Cecily Brown, Foxglove, 2001 Oil on linen, 48 × 60 inches (121.9 × 152.4 cm)© Cecily Brown

Cecily Brown, Foxglove, 2001

Oil on linen, 48 × 60 inches (121.9 × 152.4 cm)
© Cecily Brown

Cecily Brown, Figure in a Landscape, 2002 Oil on linen, 80 × 80 inches (203.2 × 203.2 cm)© Cecily Brown

Cecily Brown, Figure in a Landscape, 2002

Oil on linen, 80 × 80 inches (203.2 × 203.2 cm)
© Cecily Brown

Cecily Brown, Black Painting No. 1, 2002 Oil on linen, 80 × 90 inches (203.2 × 228.6 cm), The Broad, Los Angeles© Cecily Brown

Cecily Brown, Black Painting No. 1, 2002

Oil on linen, 80 × 90 inches (203.2 × 228.6 cm), The Broad, Los Angeles
© Cecily Brown

Cecily Brown, Girl Eating Birds, 2004 Oil on linen, 77 × 165 inches (195.6 × 419.1 cm)© Cecily Brown

Cecily Brown, Girl Eating Birds, 2004

Oil on linen, 77 × 165 inches (195.6 × 419.1 cm)
© Cecily Brown

Cecily Brown, Untitled, 2005 Oil on linen, 77 × 55 inches (195.6 × 139.7 cm)© Cecily Brown

Cecily Brown, Untitled, 2005

Oil on linen, 77 × 55 inches (195.6 × 139.7 cm)
© Cecily Brown

Cecily Brown, The Picnic, 2006 Oil on linen, 97 × 123 inches (246.4 × 312.4 cm)© Cecily Brown

Cecily Brown, The Picnic, 2006

Oil on linen, 97 × 123 inches (246.4 × 312.4 cm)
© Cecily Brown

Cecily Brown, Memento Mori 2, 2006–08 Oil on linen, 85 × 89 inches (215.9 × 226.1 cm)© Cecily Brown

Cecily Brown, Memento Mori 2, 2006–08

Oil on linen, 85 × 89 inches (215.9 × 226.1 cm)
© Cecily Brown

Cecily Brown, The Sick Leaves, 2011 Oil on linen, in 3 parts, each: 103 × 83 inches (261.6 × 210.8 cm)© Cecily Brown

Cecily Brown, The Sick Leaves, 2011

Oil on linen, in 3 parts, each: 103 × 83 inches (261.6 × 210.8 cm)
© Cecily Brown

Cecily Brown, Untitled, 2012 Oil on linen, 89 × 85 inches (226.1 × 215.9 cm)© Cecily Brown

Cecily Brown, Untitled, 2012

Oil on linen, 89 × 85 inches (226.1 × 215.9 cm)
© Cecily Brown

Cecily Brown, Combing the Hair (Côte d’Azur), 2013 Oil on linen, 109 × 113 inches (276.9 × 287 cm)© Cecily Brown. Photo: Rob McKeever

Cecily Brown, Combing the Hair (Côte d’Azur), 2013

Oil on linen, 109 × 113 inches (276.9 × 287 cm)
© Cecily Brown. Photo: Rob McKeever

Cecily Brown, The Wallflower, 2014 Oil on linen, 31 × 43 inches (78.7 × 109.2 cm)© Cecily Brown

Cecily Brown, The Wallflower, 2014

Oil on linen, 31 × 43 inches (78.7 × 109.2 cm)
© Cecily Brown

About

The place I’m interested in is where the mind goes when it’s trying to make up for what isn’t there.
—Cecily Brown

Cecily Brown makes paintings that give the appearance of being in continual flux, alive with the erotic energy of her expressive application and vivid color, shifting restlessly between abstract and figurative modes. Making reference to the giants of Western painting—from Paolo Veronese, Peter Paul Rubens, and Edgar Degas to Willem de Kooning, Francis Bacon, and Joan Mitchell—as well as to popular culture, she commands an aesthetic that breaks from the strictures of narrative to achieve an extraordinary visual and thematic fluidity. Her vigorous treatment of the nude figure in particular reveals a commitment to wresting conventional subjects free from their anticipated contexts. Punctuating her visual shorthand with moments of startling clarity, Brown maintains an endless, active present.

Raised in suburban Surrey, England, Brown studied under painter Maggi Hambling before attending art college. Her graduation from the Slade School of Fine Art in the early 1990s coincided with the rise of the Young British Artists but she didn’t share the group’s conceptual focus, ironic stance, and embrace of celebrity culture. Having spent six months in New York as an exchange student in 1992, she returned there to live in 1994, and, alongside contemporaries such as John Currin, helped to invest figurative painting with a renewed energy and critical significance that has continued to gather momentum.

Key to the success of Brown’s aesthetic is her ability to seemingly transform paint into flesh, embedding the human form within a frenzied, fragmented commentary on desire, life, and death. Her first major body of painting, from the mid-1990s, juxtaposes hedonistic rabbits with allusions to the still-life tradition; eventually, this led to the orgiastic scenes that would garner her wide and enduring recognition. In Brown’s hands, paint seems always to be in transition between liquid and solid, transparent and opaque states, and this material ballet is reflected in compositions themselves. “I think that painting is a kind of alchemy,” she has said. “The paint is transformed into image, and paint and image transform themselves into a third and new thing.”

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Fairs, Events & Announcements

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Capri 53.57), 2020 © Mark Grotjahn

Support

The Kitchen
Ice and Fire: A Benefit Exhibition in Three Parts

October 15, 2020–January 31, 2021

The benefit exhibition Ice and Fire features works by more than forty artists who have enduring relationships with the Kitchen in New York. Installed within the organization’s three-story space in Chelsea, which is currently closed due to the global pandemic, the three-part exhibition is viewable online. Proceeds from sales will go toward a planned renovation on the occasion of the Kitchen’s fiftieth anniversary, ensuring that the nonprofit space will remain a platform for artistic experimentation in its historic and beloved building. Work by Cecily Brown, Roe Ethridge, Mark Grotjahn, Alex Israel, Ed Ruscha, Taryn Simon, Mary Weatherford, and Christopher Wool is included.

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Capri 53.57), 2020 © Mark Grotjahn

Katharina Grosse, Shake Before Using, 2020 © Katharina Grosse and VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, Germany 2020

Support

Artist Plate Project
Coalition for the Homeless

November 16–December 14, 2020

Gagosian is pleased to support the Coalition for the Homeless’s Artist Plate Project fundraiser. Artwork by fifty artists, including Cecily Brown, Katharina Grosse, Sterling Ruby, Ed Ruscha, Sarah Sze, Andy Warhol, Jonas Wood, and Christopher Wool, is featured on limited-edition dinner plates produced by Prospect and made available through Artware Editions to support the Coalition’s lifesaving programs. All of the funds raised by the sale of the plates will provide food, crisis services, housing, and other critical aid to thousands of people experiencing homelessness and instability. The purchase of one plate can feed seventy-five homeless and hungry New Yorkers.

Katharina Grosse, Shake Before Using, 2020 © Katharina Grosse and VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, Germany 2020

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Treasure Hunt #2, 2020 © Nathaniel Mary Quinn

Support

100 Drawings from Now

October 7, 2020–January 17, 2021
Drawing Center, New York
drawingcenter.org

The benefit exhibition 100 Drawings from Now features drawings made by an international group of artists since early 2020, providing a snapshot of artistic production during the period of profound global unrest that has resulted from the ongoing health and economic crises, as well as the surge of activism in response to systemic racism, social injustice, and police brutality in the United States. Together, the donated works spotlight the urgency, intimacy, and universality of drawing during moments of upheaval and isolation. Proceeds from the sales will support the Drawing Center and the artists. Work by Cecily Brown, Giuseppe Penone, and Nathaniel Mary Quinn is included.

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Treasure Hunt #2, 2020 © Nathaniel Mary Quinn

See all News for Cecily Brown

Museum Exhibitions

Glenn Brown, Layered Portrait (after Lucian Freud) 4, 2008 © Glenn Brown

On View

(Re)Print
Five Projects

Opening April 30, 2020
International Print Center New York
www.ipcny.org

This online exhibition, centered on works by Mark Bradford, Cecily Brown, Glenn Brown, Enrique Chagoya, and Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, opens a dialogue between contemporary prints and the source material referenced. (Re)Print examines how artists revise, recontextualize, and personalize familiar imagery to elicit new thinking. Further, the pairings express the dynamic relationship between contemporary practice and the historical role that prints have played in image reproduction and dissemination, and in the shaping of history, culture, and beliefs.

Glenn Brown, Layered Portrait (after Lucian Freud) 4, 2008 © Glenn Brown

Installation view, No Man’s Land: Women Artists from the Rubell Family Collection, National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, DC, September 30, 2016–January 8, 2017. Artwork, left to right: © Mary Weatherford, © Kerstin Brätsch, © Sonia Gomes

Closed

No Man’s Land
Women Artists from the Rubell Family Collection

September 30, 2016–January 8, 2017
National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, DC
nmwa.org

Drawing from the Rubell Family Collection, the paintings and sculptural hybrids in N0 Man’s Land demonstrate the expressive and technical range of work by a generationally, aesthetically, and politically diverse group of contemporary women artists. Collectively, they populate “no man’s land”—an open, liberated, and adaptable creative space. The presentation focuses on the traditional mediums of painting and sculpture as a way to highlight how women artists have pushed and redefined the boundaries of such categories. Work by Cecily Brown, Jennifer Guidi, and Mary Weatherford is included.

Installation view, No Man’s Land: Women Artists from the Rubell Family Collection, National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, DC, September 30, 2016–January 8, 2017. Artwork, left to right: © Mary Weatherford, © Kerstin Brätsch, © Sonia Gomes