Menu

Gagosian Quarterly

October 22, 2014

Cecily Brownin Turin

The first major presentation of Cecily Brown’s work in an Italian museum is on view in Turin, assembling approximately fifty paintings and works on paper from distinguished American and European collections. Exhibition curator Danilo Eccher discusses the show with Alison McDonald.

Cecily Brown, The river’s tent is broken, 2014, oil on linen, 67 × 65 inches (170.2 × 165.1 cm)

Cecily Brown, The river’s tent is broken, 2014, oil on linen, 67 × 65 inches (170.2 × 165.1 cm)

Alison McDonald

Alison McDonald has been the director of publications at Gagosian since 2002. During her tenure she has worked closely with Larry Gagosian to shape every aspect of the gallery’s extensive publishing program and has personally overseen more than five hundred publications dedicated to the gallery’s artists.

See all Articles

Alison McDonald When did you first encounter the work of Cecily Brown? What resonated for you—or what events occurred—that led you to invite an exhibition of her work at Galleria d’Arte Moderna (GAM), Turin?

Danilo EccherI met Cecily Brown in the early 2000s with Ealan Wingate, who took me to her first studio in Manhattan. I was immediately surprised by her work and fascinated by her energy, and I decided to show some of her works in a small but precious exhibition at the MACRO in Rome, where I was director at that time. I have always considered that first encounter very important, and I have never stopped following Cecily’s work. Now we have an opportunity to present to the Italian public a major show of her works and to publish a great catalogue.

AMCDGAM has a rich history that dates back to 1863, a collection of more than 45,000 works, and a commitment to hosting contemporary exhibitions. The mission of the museum includes “weaving a continuous exchange between its own historical works and today’s cultural debate, and setting a close relationship for its exhibition program between contemporary and historical collections.” How does this exhibition further that legacy?

DEGAM was the first museum in Italy to focus on the relationship between historical works and contemporary works. I have always thought of art as a river, a big continuous flow impossible to contain or to restrict within limits. This is why I like to treat even the experimental and contemporary exhibitions as I would treat the more historical ones. I believe that Cecily Brown’s work, by its own nature—with the historical intersections, the references, the culture, and the education that it constantly documents—is an example of this same approach.

AMCDAre there any dialogues between the works that are shown and the museum’s permanent collection that are of particular interest for you? Are there any connections that you hope the public will make?

DEReal connections stimulate curiosity and the intellect. In our collection, for example, Cy Twombly’s Untitled (Rome, The Wall) from 1962 is displayed in the same room as Mario Merz’s Igloo from 1969, and a Picasso from 1948 stands in front of a work by Jannis Kounellis dated about twenty years later. I had invited Cecily to display one of her works outside of the exhibition space, within the museum’s permanent collection, in front of a Fontana.

Cecily Brown in Turin

Cecily Brown, The Girl and Goat, 2013–14, oil on linen, 97 × 89 inches (246.4 × 226.1 cm)

AMCDThere is an apparent abundance to your installation, which amplifies the tension and energy already prevalent in the paintings themselves. Please elaborate on the motivation behind this idea.

DEFor many years we have been used to cold and rarefied installations, which with the passing of time have lost their sense of reflection and assumed a merely decorative value. A big empty wall with only one small painting—that is the attitude. For the works of Cecily Brown, I was interested in having the visitor not just see a single work but enter physically into the painting, almost breathing it in and touching it, feeling deeply immersed in Cecily’s colors, marks, and figures. I wanted the show to be not a simple exhibition but a lived, narrative experience.

AMCDThe paintings included in your exhibition, and Cecily Brown’s paintings in general, encompass a wide range of sources that include newspapers, children’s books, and old masters. There is no hierarchy among her sources. James Lawrence has written, “We get the sensation. We also get the glimpses of history as they flow in and out, whether through direct recognition of an image or through indistinct echoes of something familiar.” How would you describe—or how does your exhibition frame—the abstract narratives that Cecily Brown creates?

DEBesides the many art-historical references, Cecily Brown’s work nourishes itself with up-to-date reality and is immersed in the social-network era. These communication media allow the spread of images beyond a precise time and without any hierarchical order, mixing up different cultural fields, epochs, styles, and suggestions. Cecily Brown’s works are deeply rooted in the painting tradition but enhance themselves with this rapid dissemination of information, with this varied and widely shared imagery.

AMCD The works you have selected for inclusion document the artist’s practice from 1999 to 2014. Boy Trouble, one work from 1999, depicts a scene that is definitively sexual. How would you describe the impact of sensual and sexual imagery within her oeuvre and the way this type of imagery, and its reception, has shaped her practice?

DEThe erotic, sensual, and sexual content in Cecily Brown works has been widely discussed and documented by critics in the past. All the same, I would not associate her art with a genre that superficially tries to provoke and scandalize, like many contemporary artistic endeavors. Cecily Brown’s work confronts a variety of content with deep insight into the surrounding reality and through an intimate meditation, a psychological and introspective attitude toward the human soul. If we recognize a biographical element, however, it is not narrative but represents a glint, a pretext.

Cecily Brown’s work confronts a variety of content with deep insight into the surrounding reality and through an intimate meditation, a psychological and introspective attitude toward the human soul.

Danilo Eccher
Cecily Brown in Turin

Cecily Brown, Breathless Noon, 2014, oil on linen, 83 × 67 inches (210.8 × 170.2 cm). Photo by Rob McKeever

AMCDKlaus Kertess has written, “Cecily Brown’s paintings swing precariously from improvisation to more conscious control, from abstraction to figuration—avoiding closure, reveling in ability and surprise.” He has also written, “I had been looking at an abstraction and a figurative painting that had neither narrative nor visual coherence. What was it to be labeled? Figtraction? Abfiguration? Neither, of course, would do.” How would you define the push and pull between control and improvisation as well as abstraction and figuration that energizes these paintings?

DE Cecily Brown’s paintings are a continuous stream of color and forms that accumulate and expand on the canvas in changing, multiple layers of influence. Staring at her paintings is like leaning out over an orchestra pit, where cultural and historical references are like musical instruments mixing their notes.

AMCDThere are quite a few works on paper (more than thirty) included in the exhibition. How do these works on paper complement the paintings? What do they add to the presentation?

DEI wanted to select a conspicuous corpus of works on paper that show the richness of the techniques she uses, as she skillfully incorporates watercolor, gouache, drawings, and monotype in her artwork. Through these works on paper it becomes clear that the variation, fluctuation, and fluidity of the images that evolve are continuously analyzing a few themes also recurrent in her paintings. The quick gesture of drawing, characteristic of sketches, has both a reflective and a meditative quality—an intuitive and impulsive immediacy, almost unconscious, that characterizes Cecily Brown’s entire body of work. In her drawings the quick and instinctive approach emerges more clearly compared with the paintings, where it is mediated by the literary construction, the time of execution, and the conceptual substance.

AMCDIs there anything unique about your installation that you feel responds to, or heightens, the viewer’s experience of the paintings?

DEIn every show, each curator intends to present his own critical thinking, a personal view about one or more artistic endeavors. A show is built as a subtle game, or balance, between the desire of the curator to let his point of view on the work emerge and the artist’s needs. If this relationship is fruitful, the show is successful and it is able to arouse curiosity in the public—as I think Cecily Brown’s show will do, arouse this curiosity.

Artwork © Cecily Brown. Cecily Brown is on view at the Galleria Civica d’Arte Moderna e Contemporanea, Turin, Italy. October 17, 2014–February 1, 2015

Peter Lindbergh photograph of four women

Peter Lindbergh: Untold Stories

The traveling retrospective gathering the work of legendary photographer Peter Lindbergh will be on view in A Coruña, Spain, from December 4, 2021, through February 28, 2022. Featuring work created over four decades of his expansive career, the exhibition was curated by Lindbergh before his death in 2019. Here, the artist’s son Benjamin Lindbergh speaks with Derek Blasberg about the project.

Cover page with title and author in black and white

Out of the Darkness

A short story by Mathapelo Mofokeng, published here on the occasion of the Quarterly’s collaboration with PEN America.

Lee “Scratch” Perry, c. 1980

Game Changer
Lee “Scratch” Perry

Connor Garel celebrates the outsized impact of this legendary musician on the world of music and beyond.

GCC Founding Committee surrounded by grass and trees

The Bigger Picture
Gallery Climate Coalition

Gallery Climate Coalition founders Victoria Siddall and Heath Lowndes speak with Adele Minardi from Gagosian, London, about the origins of the coalition, its goals, and concrete steps that every actor in the art industry can take to reduce carbon emissions.

Diego Rivera, The Making of a Fresco Showing the Building of a City, installation view, San Francisco Art Institute (SFAI)

The San Francisco Art Institute: Its History and Future

Constance Lewallen marks the 150th anniversary of the San Francisco Art Institute, exploring the school’s evolution and pioneering faculty, as well as current challenges and the innovations necessary for its preservation.

Markuskyrkan (St. Mark’s Church), Björkhagen, Sweden, 1956–60.

Sigurd Lewerentz

On the occasion of the exhibition Sigurd Lewerentz: Architect of Death and Life at ArkDes, Stockholm, Mark Francis speaks with Kieran Long, Adam Caruso, and Anna Nittve about the enduring legacy of Lewerentz and the singular qualities of the revered architect and his work.

Rachelle Mozman Solano, Las Damas, 2010, chromogenic print,

The Destination Is Latinx

Susan Breyer surveys the dynamic state of contemporary Latinx art in the United States. Highlighting seven artists who are rewriting cultural narratives, Breyer calls for sustained attention to this growing group beyond National Hispanic Heritage Month.

Anna Halprin in The Prophetess, 1955.

Game Changer
Anna Halprin

Jacquelynn Baas celebrates the choreographer, dancer, and teacher, tracing the profound influence she had on the worlds of dance and art.

Shelley Duvall in Robert Altman’s 3 Women (1977). Photo: Photo 12/Alamy Stock Photo

Shelley Duvall

Every era has a handful of actors who embody the moods and aesthetics of their time. Carlos Valladares looks back to the 1970s, the time of New Hollywood, and argues for the singular contemporaneity of Shelley Duvall.

Cecilia Pavón, Little Joy: Selected Stories, trans. Jacob Steinberg (Los Angeles: Semiotext(e), 2021).

Cecilia Pavón

Poet, writer, and translator Cecilia Pavón’s Little Joy, a collection of short stories written between 1999 and 2020, marks the first publication of the celebrated Argentine’s prose in English translation. Here, Pavón speaks with Fiona Alison Duncan, author of Exquisite Mariposa: A Novel (2019), about the art of translation, the costs of consumerism, and the importance of writing beyond the self.

Walter De Maria, The Lightning Field, 1977, long-term installation, western New Mexico. Artwork © Estate of Walter De Maria. Photo: John Cliett, courtesy Dia Art Foundation, New York, and © Estate of Walter De Maria

Light and Lightning: Wonder-Reactions at Walter De Maria’s The Lightning Field

In this second installment of a two-part essay, John Elderfield resumes his investigation of Walter De Maria’s The Lightning Field (1977), focusing this time on how the hope to see lightning there has led to the work’s association with the Romantic conception of the sublime.

Cover page with title and author against soft red, white, and blue colors

Mercury Was There

A short story by Libby Flores, published here on the occasion of the Quarterly’s collaboration with PEN America.