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Jenny Saville

Territories

October 2–November 6, 1999
Wooster Street, New York

Jenny Saville, Shift, 1996–97 Oil on canvas, 130 × 130 inches (330 × 330 cm)

Jenny Saville, Shift, 1996–97

Oil on canvas, 130 × 130 inches (330 × 330 cm)

Jenny Saville, Hyphen, 1999 Oil on canvas, 108 × 144 inches (274.3 × 365.8 cm)

Jenny Saville, Hyphen, 1999

Oil on canvas, 108 × 144 inches (274.3 × 365.8 cm)

Jenny Saville, Matrix, 1999 Oil on canvas, 84 × 120 inches (213.4 × 304.8 cm)

Jenny Saville, Matrix, 1999

Oil on canvas, 84 × 120 inches (213.4 × 304.8 cm)

Jenny Saville, Fulcrum, 1999 Oil on canvas, 103 × 192 inches (261.6 × 487.7 cm)

Jenny Saville, Fulcrum, 1999

Oil on canvas, 103 × 192 inches (261.6 × 487.7 cm)

Jenny Saville, Ruben's Flap, 1999 Oil on canvas, 120 × 96 inches (304.8 × 243.8 cm)

Jenny Saville, Ruben's Flap, 1999

Oil on canvas, 120 × 96 inches (304.8 × 243.8 cm)

About

Gagosian is pleased to present the first solo exhibition of the acclaimed young British painter Jenny Saville. Since first appearing on the London art scene in 1994 as the star of the Saatchi Gallery’s Young British Artists III and Sensation exhibitions, Saville has been recognized as one of the most thought-provoking and technically accomplished talents of her generation.

In this long-awaited exhibition of her new work, two years in the making, the distinctive nature of Saville’s giant, fleshy nudes is both surprising and provocative; her virtuoso nudes are reminiscent of the old masters, yet employed to question societal obsession with an idealized, almost robotic, image of the female form. By portraying these “images of extreme humanness” that are so out of place in an anxious culture obsessed with eternal youth and beauty, Saville confronts the very essence of what it means to have an active mind in a decaying, dying body.

Characteristic of Saville’s work, her paint becomes flesh as it evokes the feel and touch of the body, its smell and material presence. Freed from the conventions of feminine delicacy, her gargantuan figures cascade across the canvas and into the viewer’s physical space. The vast images of corpulent bodies are deliberately ambiguous as the paintings impose themselves on the viewer and surround the body that is looking at them. The viewer cannot escape the implications of their physical being.

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From the Quarterly