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Alberto Giacometti

Giacometti in Switzerland

November 18, 2010–March 5, 2011
Geneva

Installation view Artwork © Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti + ADAGP), Paris 2010. Photo: Annik Wetter

Installation view

Artwork © Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti + ADAGP), Paris 2010. Photo: Annik Wetter

Installation view  Artwork © Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti + ADAGP), Paris 2010. Photo: Annik Wetter

Installation view

Artwork © Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti + ADAGP), Paris 2010. Photo: Annik Wetter

Installation view  Artwork © Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti + ADAGP), Paris 2010. Photo: Annik Wetter

Installation view

Artwork © Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti + ADAGP), Paris 2010. Photo: Annik Wetter

Installation view  Artwork © Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti + ADAGP), Paris 2010. Photo: Annik Wetter

Installation view

Artwork © Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti + ADAGP), Paris 2010. Photo: Annik Wetter

Installation view  Artwork © Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti + ADAGP), Paris 2010. Photo: Annik Wetter

Installation view

Artwork © Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti + ADAGP), Paris 2010. Photo: Annik Wetter

Works Exhibited

Alberto Giacometti, Interior, 1946 Pencil on paper, framed: 27 ½ × 21 ⅛ inches (69.8 × 53.7 cm)© Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti + ADAGP), Paris 2010

Alberto Giacometti, Interior, 1946

Pencil on paper, framed: 27 ½ × 21 ⅛ inches (69.8 × 53.7 cm)
© Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti + ADAGP), Paris 2010

Alberto Giacometti, Buste d’homme, 1961 Bronze, height: 18 inches (45.7 cm)© Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti + ADAGP), Paris 2010

Alberto Giacometti, Buste d’homme, 1961

Bronze, height: 18 inches (45.7 cm)
© Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti + ADAGP), Paris 2010

Alberto Giacometti, Femme debout (certificate no. 1569), 1963 Ballpoint pen on book page, 9 ¼ × 12 ¼ inches (23.5 × 31 cm)© Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti + ADAGP), Paris 2010

Alberto Giacometti, Femme debout (certificate no. 1569), 1963

Ballpoint pen on book page, 9 ¼ × 12 ¼ inches (23.5 × 31 cm)
© Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti + ADAGP), Paris 2010

Alberto Giacometti, Chaise et suspension, 1963 Lithograph, 25 ¾ × 19 ¾ inches (65.5 × 50.3 cm)© Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti + ADAGP), Paris 2010

Alberto Giacometti, Chaise et suspension, 1963

Lithograph, 25 ¾ × 19 ¾ inches (65.5 × 50.3 cm)
© Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti + ADAGP), Paris 2010

Alberto Giacometti, Mère de l’artiste assise IV, 1963 Lithograph, 25 ¾ × 19 inches (65.5 × 48.2 cm)© Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti + ADAGP), Paris 2010

Alberto Giacometti, Mère de l’artiste assise IV, 1963

Lithograph, 25 ¾ × 19 inches (65.5 × 48.2 cm)
© Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti + ADAGP), Paris 2010

Alberto Giacometti, Mère de l’artiste, lisant I, 1963 Lithograph, 26 ¾ × 19 ¾ inches (68 × 50 cm)© Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti + ADAGP), Paris 2010

Alberto Giacometti, Mère de l’artiste, lisant I, 1963

Lithograph, 26 ¾ × 19 ¾ inches (68 × 50 cm)
© Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti + ADAGP), Paris 2010

Alberto Giacometti, Tête de femme de face, tête d’homme de face et tête d’homme de profil, after December 5, 1963 13 × 13 inches (33.1 × 33.2 cm)© Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti + ADAGP), Paris 2010

Alberto Giacometti, Tête de femme de face, tête d’homme de face et tête d’homme de profil, after December 5, 1963

13 × 13 inches (33.1 × 33.2 cm)
© Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti + ADAGP), Paris 2010

Alberto Giacometti, Buste d’Annette X, 1965 Bronze, 17 ¼ × 7 ¼ × 5 ½ inches (43.9 × 18.4 × 13.7 cm)© Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti + ADAGP), Paris 2010

Alberto Giacometti, Buste d’Annette X, 1965

Bronze, 17 ¼ × 7 ¼ × 5 ½ inches (43.9 × 18.4 × 13.7 cm)
© Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti + ADAGP), Paris 2010

Alberto Giacometti, Sculptures dans l’atelier à Stampa, 1965 Lithograph, 22 × 15 ½ inches (56.2 × 39.7 cm)© Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti + ADAGP), Paris 2010

Alberto Giacometti, Sculptures dans l’atelier à Stampa, 1965

Lithograph, 22 × 15 ½ inches (56.2 × 39.7 cm)
© Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti + ADAGP), Paris 2010

Alberto Giacometti, Buste d’homme (New York I), 1965 Bronze, height: 21 ¼ inches (54 cm)© Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti + ADAGP), Paris 2010

Alberto Giacometti, Buste d’homme (New York I), 1965

Bronze, height: 21 ¼ inches (54 cm)
© Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti + ADAGP), Paris 2010

About

RELATIVITY OF ALL THINGS, and the mountains in Stampa? They are here and they will remain, like the forest.
Alberto Giacometti

To inaugurate the new gallery in Geneva, Gagosian is pleased to present Giacometti in Switzerland, an exhibition of rarely seen sculptures, paintings, and works on paper by Alberto Giacometti, as well as documentary material drawn from the archives of his estate.

Giacometti in Switzerland focuses on the works that Giacometti produced in Stampa, a town in the Bregaglia valley near the Italian border where he was born, and in Geneva, where he spent time during World War II. From its spectacular, almost anthropomorphic, mountainous landscapes to the incidental details of village streets, Stampa remained an inspiration to Giacometti throughout his life. Though intimate in scale and character, Gagosian’s first solo exhibition of Giacometti’s work—following important group exhibitions at Gagosian London and Gagosian New York in which his work has featured prominently—encompasses the breadth of his prodigious career, from an early still-life drawing to a Buste d’homme of 1965. Between these two markers are other still lifes, portraits, and figure studies—including drawings in ink and pencil, paintings on cardboard and canvas, and lithographs—as well as sculptures in plaster and bronze.

Throughout his life Giacometti remained fascinated by the existential challenges and ineffable mysteries of the human figure and psyche, which he explored in the portraits or likenesses that he produced of family, friends, and colleagues. His mother, for example, became a central focus in a series of works that include the plaster bust Tête de la mere (1927–30) as well as drawings and lithographs of her reading and sitting. Giacometti’s portrayals convey the strength of his emotional attachment to her as well as his conceptual and formal attention to the charged space that a single person occupies, which he called “the void.” Long after his mother’s death, he continued to work in the solitude of the Stampa studio as a respite from his busy life in Paris; Buste d’Homme (dit New York I) (1965)—modeled after his brother Diego as well as other male models in an attempt to create the “anonymous portrait”—and Buste d’Annette X (1965), one of the many portraits that he made of his wife, were both produced there and shown in his retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in 1965.

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