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Arakawa

Arakawa, Waiting Voices, 1976–77 Acrylic, varnish, pencil, and art marker on canvas and linen, 70 × 96 inches (177.8 × 243.8 cm)© 2018 Estate of Madeline Gins. Reproduced with permission of the Estate of Madeline Gins

Arakawa, Waiting Voices, 1976–77

Acrylic, varnish, pencil, and art marker on canvas and linen, 70 × 96 inches (177.8 × 243.8 cm)
© 2018 Estate of Madeline Gins. Reproduced with permission of the Estate of Madeline Gins

About

Renowned for his paintings, drawings, and prints, as well as his innovative architectural constructions, Arakawa was one of the earliest practitioners of the international conceptual art movement of the 1960s. After moving to New York from Japan in 1961, he produced diagrammatic paintings, drawings, and other conceptual works that employed systems of words and signs to both highlight and investigate the mechanics of human perception and knowledge. In 1962 Arakawa met the American poet Madeline Gins, with whom he developed a personal and creative partnership. Together they expanded Arakawa’s painting practice into an important series entitled The Mechanism of Meaning, a suite of eighty canvases that explored the workings of human consciousness. The Mechanism of Meaning exists in two versions, exhibited in their entirety by the Sezon Museum of Modern Art, Karuizawa, Japan, in 1988 and the Guggenheim Museum, New York, in 1997. In the 1990s Arakawa and Gins developed the theory of “procedural architecture” which proposes using the built form as a way to investigate and transform the relationship between body and environment. Through architecture specifically, they endeavored to “learn how not to die.” Terming this concept “reversible destiny,” they believed firmly in the capacity of their architectural works to positively influence the personal well-being and longevity of those who lived within them. Arakawa and Gins dedicated the remainder of their lives to seeing these ideas integrated into architectural theory and contemporary building design.

Arakawa was born in 1936 in Nagoya, Japan, and died in 2010 in New York. He attended the Musashino Art University in Tokyo. His work has been exhibited extensively throughout North America, Western Europe, and Japan. Major retrospectives include Constructing the Perceiver—Arakawa: Experimental Works, National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo (1991), and Reversible Destiny— Arakawa/Gins, Guggenheim Museum, New York (1997). His work is featured in institutional collections worldwide, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Centre Pompidou, Paris; Sezon Museum of Modern Art, Karuizawa, Japan; and National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo, as well as in numerous private and corporate collections. Arakawa represented Japan in the 35th Biennale di Venezia, Venice in 1970 and was included in Documenta IV (1968) and Documenta VI (1977).

From the Quarterly

Fairs, Events & Announcements

Arakawa, Why Not (A Serenade of Eschatological Ecology), 1969 © 2017 Estate of Madeline Gins. Reproduced with permission of the Estate of Madeline Gins and Reversible Destiny Foundation

Screening

Arakawa
Why Not (A Serenade of Eschatological Ecology)

Monday, October 16, 2017, 7pm
National Sawdust, Brooklyn, New York
www.nationalsawdust.org

Arakawa’s film Why Not (A Serenade of Eschatological Ecology) (1969) will be screened. Renowned for his paintings, drawings, prints, and visionary architectural constructions, the artist's wide range of experimentation extended into filmmaking. There will be a discussion after the film with Peter Katz, Diana Seo Hyung Lee, Jay Sanders, and Miwako Tezuka. To attend the event, purchase tickets at www.nationalsawdust.org.

Arakawa, Why Not (A Serenade of Eschatological Ecology), 1969 © 2017 Estate of Madeline Gins. Reproduced with permission of the Estate of Madeline Gins and Reversible Destiny Foundation

Arakawa, Waiting Voices, 1976–77 © 2016 Estate of Madeline Gins. Reproduced with permission of the Estate of Madeline Gins

New Representation

Arakawa

Gagosian is pleased to announce its representation of the artwork of Arakawa on behalf of the Estate of Madeline Gins and the Reversible Destiny Foundation, a foundation established by Arakawa and Gins.

Arakawa, Waiting Voices, 1976–77 © 2016 Estate of Madeline Gins. Reproduced with permission of the Estate of Madeline Gins

Museum Exhibitions

Arakawa and Madeline Gins, Drawing for “Container of Perceiving,” 1984 © 2018 Estate of Madeline Gins. Photo by Nicholas Knight

Closed

Arakawa and Madeline Gins
Eternal Gradient

March 30–June 16, 2018
Arthur Ross Architecture Gallery, Columbia University, New York
www.arch.columbia.edu

In the early 1960s Arakawa and Madeline Gins began a prolific collaboration that spanned nearly five decades and encompassed painting, installations, poetry, literature, architecture, urbanism, philosophy, and scientific research. The exhibition will examine this pivotal exploratory period through an array of original drawings—many exhibited for the first time—as well as archival material and writings that illuminate the working methods and wide-ranging research interests of Arakawa and Gins.

Arakawa and Madeline Gins, Drawing for “Container of Perceiving,” 1984 © 2018 Estate of Madeline Gins. Photo by Nicholas Knight

Michael Heizer, Double Negative, 1969

Closed

Los Angeles to New York
Dwan Gallery, 1959–1971

March 19–September 10, 2017
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
www.lacma.org

This exhibition features modern and contemporary works from the personal collection of gallerist Virginia Dwan. The selection has been culled from Dwan’s promised gift to Washington, DC’s National Gallery of Art, which includes major works by American artists based on the East and West Coasts. The exhibition aims to illustrate Dwan’s creative spirit and her close association with Minimalism, conceptual art, and large-scale Earthworks. Included are artists Arakawa, Walter De Maria, Michael Heizer, and Yves Klein.

Michael Heizer, Double Negative, 1969