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Nam June Paik

Nam June Paik, Magnet TV, 1965 Television (black and white, silent) with magnet, 28 ⅜ × 19 ¼ × 24 ½ inches (72 × 48.9 × 62.2 cm), Whitney Museum of American Art, New York© Nam June Paik Estate

Nam June Paik, Magnet TV, 1965

Television (black and white, silent) with magnet, 28 ⅜ × 19 ¼ × 24 ½ inches (72 × 48.9 × 62.2 cm), Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
© Nam June Paik Estate

Nam June Paik, TV Chair, 1968 Closed-circuit video (black and white) with television and chair with Plexiglas seat, 33 × 17 × 15 inches (83.2 × 43.2 × 38.1 cm)© Nam June Paik Estate

Nam June Paik, TV Chair, 1968

Closed-circuit video (black and white) with television and chair with Plexiglas seat, 33 × 17 × 15 inches (83.2 × 43.2 × 38.1 cm)
© Nam June Paik Estate

Nam June Paik, Opus Paintings, 1975 Oil on canvas, in 32 parts, each: 10 × 8 inches (25.4 × 20.3 cm)© Nam June Paik Estate

Nam June Paik, Opus Paintings, 1975

Oil on canvas, in 32 parts, each: 10 × 8 inches (25.4 × 20.3 cm)
© Nam June Paik Estate

Nam June Paik, The More the Better, 1988 Three-channel video (color, sound) with 1,003 monitors and steel structure, approximately 60 feet (18.3 m) tall, National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Seoul© Nam June Paik Estate

Nam June Paik, The More the Better, 1988

Three-channel video (color, sound) with 1,003 monitors and steel structure, approximately 60 feet (18.3 m) tall, National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Seoul
© Nam June Paik Estate

Nam June Paik, Untitled [Newspaper Drawing], c. 1990 Oil stick on printed newsprint, 22 ⅝ × 15 ⅛ inches (57.5 × 38.4 cm), Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC© Nam June Paik Estate

Nam June Paik, Untitled [Newspaper Drawing], c. 1990

Oil stick on printed newsprint, 22 ⅝ × 15 ⅛ inches (57.5 × 38.4 cm), Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC
© Nam June Paik Estate

Nam June Paik, 359 Canal Street, 1991 Desk with wood blocks from George Maciunas demolition, acrylic, television chassis, newspaper clippings, piano key, and letters (authors include Yoko Ono, Ray Johnson, and Wolf Vostell), dimensions variable© Nam June Paik Estate

Nam June Paik, 359 Canal Street, 1991

Desk with wood blocks from George Maciunas demolition, acrylic, television chassis, newspaper clippings, piano key, and letters (authors include Yoko Ono, Ray Johnson, and Wolf Vostell), dimensions variable
© Nam June Paik Estate

Nam June Paik, Untitled (RCA Victor), 1996 Single-channel video with 22-inch monitor, 43 ½ × 37 ½ × 35 inches (110.5 × 95.3 × 88.9 cm)© Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Nam June Paik, Untitled (RCA Victor), 1996

Single-channel video with 22-inch monitor, 43 ½ × 37 ½ × 35 inches (110.5 × 95.3 × 88.9 cm)
© Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Nam June Paik, Untitled [Console RCA Victor Deluxe], 1996 Single-channel video (color, silent) in a vintage television cabinet with acrylic and toy robot, dimensions variable© Nam June Paik Estate

Nam June Paik, Untitled [Console RCA Victor Deluxe], 1996

Single-channel video (color, silent) in a vintage television cabinet with acrylic and toy robot, dimensions variable
© Nam June Paik Estate

Nam June Paik, Untitled, 1998 Acrylic on canvas, 46 × 67 inches (116.8 × 170.2 cm)© Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Ben Blackwell

Nam June Paik, Untitled, 1998

Acrylic on canvas, 46 × 67 inches (116.8 × 170.2 cm)
© Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Ben Blackwell

Nam June Paik, Untitled, 1999 Pastel on paper, 22 ⅜ × 30 inches (56.8 × 76.2 cm)© Nam June Paik Estate

Nam June Paik, Untitled, 1999

Pastel on paper, 22 ⅜ × 30 inches (56.8 × 76.2 cm)
© Nam June Paik Estate

Nam June Paik, Bakelite Robot, 2002 Single-channel video (color, silent) with LCD monitors and vintage Bakelite radios, 48 × 50 × 7 ¾ inches (121.9 × 127 × 19.7 cm)© Nam June Paik Estate

Nam June Paik, Bakelite Robot, 2002

Single-channel video (color, silent) with LCD monitors and vintage Bakelite radios, 48 × 50 × 7 ¾ inches (121.9 × 127 × 19.7 cm)
© Nam June Paik Estate

Nam June Paik, TV Cello, 2003 Single-channel video with 20-inch LCD monitor, 15-inch LCD monitor, and 13-inch CRT monitor, 64 ½ × 21 ½ × 23 inches (163.8 × 54.6 × 58.4 cm)© Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Nam June Paik, TV Cello, 2003

Single-channel video with 20-inch LCD monitor, 15-inch LCD monitor, and 13-inch CRT monitor, 64 ½ × 21 ½ × 23 inches (163.8 × 54.6 × 58.4 cm)
© Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Rob McKeever

Nam June Paik, Golden Buddha, 2005 Closed-circuit video (color) with television and bronze Buddha with permanent oil marker additions, overall: 46 ½ × 31 ¾ × 106 inches (118.1 × 80.6 × 296.2 cm)© Nam June Paik Estate

Nam June Paik, Golden Buddha, 2005

Closed-circuit video (color) with television and bronze Buddha with permanent oil marker additions, overall: 46 ½ × 31 ¾ × 106 inches (118.1 × 80.6 × 296.2 cm)
© Nam June Paik Estate

Nam June Paik, Third Eye Television, 2005 Single-channel video (color, sound) in a vintage television with permanent oil marker and acrylic, 17 ½ × 20 ¾ × 18 ¾ inches (44.5 × 52.7 × 47.6 cm)© Nam June Paik Estate

Nam June Paik, Third Eye Television, 2005

Single-channel video (color, sound) in a vintage television with permanent oil marker and acrylic, 17 ½ × 20 ¾ × 18 ¾ inches (44.5 × 52.7 × 47.6 cm)
© Nam June Paik Estate

Nam June Paik, Lion, 2005 Three-channel video (color, silent) with 2 plasma monitors and 26 CRT monitors and wood lion with acrylic and permanent oil marker additions, 133 × 109 × 65 inches (337.8 × 276.9 × 165.1 cm)© Nam June Paik Estate

Nam June Paik, Lion, 2005

Three-channel video (color, silent) with 2 plasma monitors and 26 CRT monitors and wood lion with acrylic and permanent oil marker additions, 133 × 109 × 65 inches (337.8 × 276.9 × 165.1 cm)
© Nam June Paik Estate

Nam June Paik, Untitled [Cage Composite], 2005 Two-channel video (color, silent) in vintage televisions with electric lights and permanent oil marker, 45 ½ × 21 × 23 ½ inches (115.6 × 53.3 × 59.7 cm)© Nam June Paik Estate

Nam June Paik, Untitled [Cage Composite], 2005

Two-channel video (color, silent) in vintage televisions with electric lights and permanent oil marker, 45 ½ × 21 × 23 ½ inches (115.6 × 53.3 × 59.7 cm)
© Nam June Paik Estate

About

Skin has become inadequate in interfacing with reality. Technology has become the body’s new membrane of existence.
—Nam June Paik

Nam June Paik (1932–2006) brought the television to fine art, treating it as a tactile and multisensory medium and object. Trained as a classical pianist, he came into contact with protagonists of the counterculture and avant-garde movements of the 1960s through his early interests in composition and performance, and this engagement profoundly shaped his outlook at a time when electronic images were becoming increasingly present in everyday life. His groundbreaking work is considered seminal to the development of video art.

Born in Seoul, Paik fled with his family in 1950 to escape the Korean War, traveling first to Hong Kong and then to Japan. After graduating from the University of Tokyo in 1956, he moved to West Germany to continue his studies. There he met the composers Karlheinz Stockhausen and John Cage, as well as the conceptual artists George Maciunas and Joseph Beuys, all of whom deeply affected his thoughts on performance. He joined the Fluxus group in 1962 and moved from the manual manipulation of audiotapes to experimenting with television sets and their screens. Two years later, by this time living in New York, Paik met the cellist Charlotte Moorman, a central figure of the city’s avant-garde, and the two began a collaboration that would last until her death in 1991. Paik created many of his most well-known works for Moorman, including TV Bra for Living Sculpture (1969) and TV-Cello (1971).

Prior to moving to the United States, Paik had met the engineer Shuya Abe, who would also become a longtime collaborator as well as his assistant. Abe helped Paik make his first robot, Robot K-456, in 1964. Composed of metal fragments, fabric, a data recorder, and a loudspeaker that plays recordings of speeches by John F. Kennedy, Robot K-456 captures Paik’s interest in merging popular media and technology with human traits; possessing abstracted breasts and penis, it moves on wheels and is programmed to periodically defecate beans. Paik showed this remote-controlled robot in several exhibitions and performances in New York throughout the 1960s. In 1982, during his first major museum exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art, he took Robot K-456 out into the street to orchestrate an “accident”: the robot walked down Madison Avenue and was hit by a car as it attempted to cross 75th Street. For Paik, this spectacle represented a “catastrophe of technology in the twentieth century.”

Alongside his robotic works, Paik maintained a dynamic drawing practice, both in works on paper and in multimedia sculptures and installations. His modified television sets, in particular, combine the moving image with the free, expressive gesture of abstraction; using brightly colored markers, paints, and other materials, Paik would add expressive layers to the screens. Lion (2005), a monumental assemblage comprising twenty-eight television screens and a hand-painted guardian lion sculpture framed within a wooden arch, displays fast-paced montages of flowers, animals, and fish, as well as footage of lions and Merce Cunningham dancing. Lion is emblematic of Paik’s late style, in which he often reflected upon the many artists and performers who influenced his oeuvre.

Nam June Paik

Photo: Sueddeutsche Zeitung Photo/Alamy Stock Photo

Website

paikstudios.com

Fairs, Events & Announcements

Ed Ruscha, Even Though He’s Light Years Away, His Heart Belongs to Me, 1963 © Ed Ruscha

Art Fair

Seattle Art Fair

August 2–5, 2018, booth A09
CenturyLink Field Event Center, Seattle
www.seattleartfair.com

Gagosian is pleased to present Out of This World: Artists Explore Space, a booth curated by Larry Gagosian for the 2018 Seattle Art Fair. The presentation gathers works that reveal artistic and scientific explorations of the cosmos. Featured artists include Richard Avedon, Andisheh Avini, Chris Burden, Alexander Calder, Vija Celmins, Ellen Gallagher, Andreas Gursky, Damien Hirst, Neil Jenney, Mike Kelley, Yves Klein, Vera Lutter, Brice Marden, Marc Newson, Nam June Paik, Thomas Ruff, Ed Ruscha, Tom Sachs, Taryn Simon, Yves Tanguy, and Andy Warhol, among others.

To receive a PDF with detailed information on the works, please contact the gallery at inquire@gagosian.com. To attend the fair, purchase tickets at seattleartfair.com.

Ed Ruscha, Even Though He’s Light Years Away, His Heart Belongs to Me, 1963 © Ed Ruscha

Zeng Fanzhi, 8, 2018 © Zeng Fanzhi 2018

Art Fair

Art Basel Hong Kong

March 29–31, 2018, booth ICI8
Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Center
www.artbasel.com

Gagosian is pleased to participate in Art Basel Hong Kong. To view highlights from the booth in advance of the fair visit www.artsy.com. Our presentation will include works by Georg Baselitz, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Joe Bradley, Cecily Brown, Glenn Brown, Alexander Calder, John Currin, Willem de Kooning, Edmund De Waal, Jean Dubuffet, Urs Fischer, Lucio Fontana, Walton Ford, Katharina Grosse, Mark Grotjahn, Andreas Gursky, Damien Hirst, Jia Aili, Anish Kapoor, Yves Klein, Karen Kneffel, Jeff Koons, Harmony Korine, Roy Lichtenstein, Takashi Murakami, Takashi Murakami & Virgil Abloh, Albert Oehlen, Nam June Paik, Francis Picabia, Pablo Picasso, Sterling Ruby, Ed Ruscha, Jenny Saville, Richard Serra, Rudolf Stingel, Mark Tansey, Cy Twombly, Andy Warhol, Jonas Wood, Christopher Wool, and Zeng Fanzhi. Tickets are available at www.artbasel.com.

Zeng Fanzhi, 8, 2018 © Zeng Fanzhi 2018

Nam June Paik, Lion, 2005 © Nam June Paik Estate

Art Fair

The Armory Show

March 8–11, 2018, Pier 94, booth 800
Piers 92 and 94, New York
www.thearmoryshow.com

The Gagosian booth will be dedicated to Nam June Paik. The artist’s monumental assemblage Lion (2005), the centerpiece of the booth, is comprised of a hand-painted guardian lion sculpture framed within a wooden arch and twenty-eight television screens of various sizes. The televisions display fast-paced montages of flowers, animals, and fish, as well as real-time footage of lions and of Merce Cunningham dancing. Lion is emblematic of Paik’s “late style,” in which he often reflected upon artists
and performers who influenced his oeuvre. Individual television sculptures and mixed-media works by the artist will also be on view. If you wish to receive a PDF with detailed information on the works, please contact us at newyork@gagosian.com. Tickets are available at www.thearmoryshow.com.

Nam June Paik, Lion, 2005 © Nam June Paik Estate

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Museum Exhibitions

Nam June Paik, TV Clock, 1963/89 © Nam June Paik Estate

On View

Nam June Paik
TV Clock

Through October 14, 2018
Santa Barbara Museum of Art, California
www.sbma.net

Nam June Paik’s TV Clock (1963/89) is on view for the first time in nearly a decade. The work consists of twenty-four color televisions mounted upright on pedestals that are arranged in a gentle arc and displayed in a darkened space. Paik created each electronic image by manipulating the television to compress its red, green, and blue colors into a single line against a black background.

Nam June Paik, TV Clock, 1963/89 © Nam June Paik Estate

Robert Therrien, No title (table leg), 2010 © Robert Therrien/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Peter Cox

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No Place Like Home

March 1–June 3, 2018
Museu Coleção Berardo, Lisbon, Portugal
en.museuberardo.pt

In celebration of Dada’s one hundredth anniversary in 2016 and the centennial of Marcel Duchamp’s Fountain in 2017, this exhibition examines how artists have incorporated commonplace household items into their work, removing these objects from the context of the home in ways that subvert the experiences of daily life. This exhibit has traveled from the Israel Museum in Jerusalem. Work by Duchamp, Duane Hanson, Damien Hirst, Man Ray, Takashi Murakami, Nam June Paik, Robert Therrien, and Andy Warhol is included.

Robert Therrien, No title (table leg), 2010 © Robert Therrien/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Peter Cox

Nam June Paik, Internet Dream, 1994 © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Steffan Harms

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Art in the Age of the Internet, 1989 to Today

February 6–May 20, 2018
Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston
www.icaboston.org

This exhibition examines how the Internet has radically changed the field of art, especially its production, distribution, and reception. The show comprises a broad range of works across a variety of mediums that all investigate the extensive effects of the Internet on artistic practice and contemporary culture. Work by Nam June Paik and Taryn Simon is included.

Nam June Paik, Internet Dream, 1994 © Nam June Paik Estate. Photo: Steffan Harms

Robert Therrien, No title (folding table and chairs, beige), 2006, Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York © Robert Therrien/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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Out of Sight! Art of the Senses

November 4, 2017–February 4, 2018
Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York
www.albrightknox.org

Out of Sight! Art of the Senses brings together contemporary works of art that actively engage with how our bodies meet the wider world through the
five basic senses. The artists in this exhibition have created experiences that incorporate viewers into the creative process, inviting them to become fully immersed in art that must be smelled, tasted, heard, and felt. Work by Nam June Paik and Robert Therrien is included.

Robert Therrien, No title (folding table and chairs, beige), 2006, Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York © Robert Therrien/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

See all Museum Exhibitions for Nam June Paik