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Pablo Picasso

The Sculptures of Pablo Picasso

April 3–May 3, 2003
980 Madison Avenue, New York

Pablo Picasso, The Pregnant Woman, 1948–50 Plaster with a metal armature, wood (for the arms), large vessel (for the stomach), two pottery jars (for the breasts), 43 1/3 × 8 2/3 × 12 ½ inches (110 × 22 × 32 cm)© ARS

Pablo Picasso, The Pregnant Woman, 1948–50

Plaster with a metal armature, wood (for the arms), large vessel (for the stomach), two pottery jars (for the breasts), 43 1/3 × 8 2/3 × 12 ½ inches (110 × 22 × 32 cm)
© ARS

Pablo Picasso, Head, 1928 Brass and iron, painted, 7 × 4 1/3 × 3 inches (18 × 11 × 7.5 cm)© ARS

Pablo Picasso, Head, 1928

Brass and iron, painted, 7 × 4 1/3 × 3 inches (18 × 11 × 7.5 cm)
© ARS

Pablo Picasso, Head of a Woman (Tête de femme: Marie-Thérèse Walter), 1931–32 (cast 1973) Bronze, 34 × 14 ⅜ × 19 ¼ inches (86.4 × 36.5 × 48.9 cm)© Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Pablo Picasso, Head of a Woman (Tête de femme: Marie-Thérèse Walter), 1931–32 (cast 1973)

Bronze, 34 × 14 ⅜ × 19 ¼ inches (86.4 × 36.5 × 48.9 cm)
© Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

About

Gagosian is honored to present, with the generous support of the Picasso family and other important lenders, a comprehensive exhibition of sculpture by Pablo Picasso.

The Sculptures of Pablo Picasso traces a path from the artist’s early bronzes to monumental heads and carved wood figures from the Boisgeloup period as well as constructions that incorporate diverse media and objets-trouvés. Also included are works from the ’30s, ’40s, and ’50s executed in clay, bronze, iron, plaster, and wood, as well as signature painted metal cutouts from the late period.

This exhibition incorporates such iconic and celebrated sculptures as Head of a Woman (Fernande) (1909), Glass of Absinth (1914), Study for Monument to Guillaume Apollinaire (1928), Head of a Woman (Boisgeloup) (1930), Still Life with Glass (1938), Head of a Bull (1950), and Pregnant Woman (1950), as well as other rarely seen works.

A fully illustrated catalogue edited by and with an introduction by Diana Widmaier Picasso will accompany the exhibition. The catalogue will include an essay by Robert Rosenblum.

A black-and-white portrait of Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler seated at a desk in front of a painting by Pablo Picasso.

Game Changer
Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler

Michael Cary pays homage to the visionary dealer Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler (1884–1979).

Grace McCann Morley, c. 1950s.

Game Changer
Grace McCann Morley

Berit Potter pays homage to the ardent museum leader who transformed San Francisco’s relationship to modern art.

Charlotte Perriand in her studio on place Saint-Sulpice, Paris, 1928. The hands holding a plate halolike behind her head are Le Corbusier’s.

The New World of Charlotte Perriand

Inspired by a visit to the Fondation Louis Vuitton’s exhibition Charlotte Perriand: Inventing a New World, William Middleton explores the life of this modernist pioneer and her impact on the worlds of design, art, and architecture.

Diana Widmaier-Picasso standing in front of a bookcase

Picasso and Maya: An Interview with Diana Widmaier-Picasso

Diana Widmaier-Picasso curated a presentation at Gagosian, Paris, to celebrate the publication of Picasso and Maya: Father and Daughter at the end of 2019. This comprehensive reference publication explores the figure of Maya Ruiz-Picasso, Pablo Picasso’s beloved eldest daughter, throughout Picasso’s work and chronicles the loving relationship between the artist and his daughter. In this video, Widmaier-Picasso details her ongoing interest in the subject and reflects on the process of making the book.

Still from video Visions of the Self: Jenny Saville on Rembrandt

Visions of the Self: Jenny Saville on Rembrandt

Jenny Saville reveals the process behind her new self-portrait, painted in response to Rembrandt’s masterpiece Self-Portrait with Two Circles.

Claude Picasso and John Richardson

In Conversation
Claude Picasso and John Richardson

Picasso biographer Sir John Richardson sits down with Claude Picasso to discuss Claude’s photography, his enjoyment of vintage car racing, and the future of scholarship related to his father, Pablo Picasso.