Menu

Jeff Koons

May 30–August 24, 2018
976 Madison Avenue, New York

Installation video Play Button

Installation video

Installation view Artwork © Jeff Koons. Photo: Tom Powel

Installation view

Artwork © Jeff Koons. Photo: Tom Powel

Installation view Artwork © Jeff Koons. Photo: Tom Powel

Installation view

Artwork © Jeff Koons. Photo: Tom Powel

Installation view Artwork © Jeff Koons. Photo: Tom Powel

Installation view

Artwork © Jeff Koons. Photo: Tom Powel

Installation view Artwork © Jeff Koons. Photo: Tom Powel

Installation view

Artwork © Jeff Koons. Photo: Tom Powel

Installation view Artwork © Jeff Koons. Photo: Tom Powel

Installation view

Artwork © Jeff Koons. Photo: Tom Powel

Installation view Artwork © Jeff Koons. Photo: Tom Powel

Installation view

Artwork © Jeff Koons. Photo: Tom Powel

Installation view Artwork © Jeff Koons. Photo: Tom Powel

Installation view

Artwork © Jeff Koons. Photo: Tom Powel

Installation view Artwork © Jeff Koons. Photo: Tom Powel

Installation view

Artwork © Jeff Koons. Photo: Tom Powel

Works Exhibited

Jeff Koons, Gazing Ball (Poussin The Triumph of Pan), 2015–16 Oil on canvas, glass, and aluminum, 63 ½ × 68 ¼ × 14 ¾ inches (161.3 × 173.4 × 37.5 cm)© Jeff Koons

Jeff Koons, Gazing Ball (Poussin The Triumph of Pan), 2015–16

Oil on canvas, glass, and aluminum, 63 ½ × 68 ¼ × 14 ¾ inches (161.3 × 173.4 × 37.5 cm)
© Jeff Koons

About

I think art teaches us how to feel, and what our parameters can be. It makes us more engaged with life.
—Jeff Koons

Gagosian is pleased to present recent works by Jeff Koons from the Gazing Ball series.

Making use of conceptual constructs including the ancient, the everyday, and the sublime, Koons creates luxurious icons and elaborate tableaux, which, beneath their captivating exteriors, engage the viewer in a metaphysical dialogue with cultural history.

With the Gazing Ball series, Koons draws attention to the continuity of images as they pass through time. In each work, a blue mirrored, hand-blown glass gazing ball—a convention from eighteenth-century garden design—is affixed to a replica of a famous painting or sculpture, adding a layer of sensory experience to familiar masterpieces. Installed within these art historical milestones, the gazing ball reflects its surroundings, uniting painting, sculpture, and architecture.

Included in this exhibition are seven Gazing Ball paintings, ranging from mythical and pastoral scenes by Jacques-Louis David, Hendrick Goltzius, Nicolas Poussin, and Tintoretto to a self-portrait by Rembrandt and a stark depiction of a dead fox in the snow by Gustave Courbet. Koons captures the artists’ variations in style, technique, and subject matter, offering a glimpse into the past, while the gleaming orbs locate the viewer in the immediate present. In the only Gazing Ball sculpture in the show, the blue sphere is placed atop a copy of Marcel Duchamp’s Bottle Rack (1914), raising questions about the definition of the readymade, as well as its relevance within Koons’s larger oeuvre.

Josh Kline, Skittles, 2014, commercial fridge, light box, and blended liquids in bottles, 86 ½ × 127 ½ × 41 inches (219.7 × 323.9 × 104.1 cm) © Josh Kline. Photo:  © Timothy Schenck

Laws of Motion

Catalyzed by Laws of Motion—a group exhibition pairing artworks from the 1980s on by Jeff Koons, Cady Noland, Rosemarie Trockel, and Jeff Wall with contemporary sculptures by Josh Kline and Anicka Yi—Wyatt Allgeier discusses the convergences and divergences in these artists’ practices with an eye to the economic worlds from which they spring.

The cover of the Fall 2019 Gagosian Quarterly magazine. Artwork by Nathaniel Mary Quinn

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Fall 2019

The Fall 2019 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring a detail from Sinking (2019) by Nathaniel Mary Quinn on its cover.

Glenstone Museum.

Intimate Grandeur: Glenstone Museum

Paul Goldberger tracks the evolution of Mitchell and Emily Rales’s Glenstone Museum in Potomac, Maryland. Set amid 230 acres of pristine landscape and housing a world-class collection of modern and contemporary art, this graceful complex of pavilions, designed by architects Thomas Phifer and Partners, opened to the public in the fall of 2018.

Still from video Visions of the Self: Jenny Saville on Rembrandt

Visions of the Self: Jenny Saville on Rembrandt

Jenny Saville reveals the process behind her new self-portrait, painted in response to Rembrandt’s masterpiece Self-Portrait with Two Circles.

Jeff Koons: Easyfun-Ethereal

Jeff Koons: Easyfun-Ethereal

Learn more about Jeff Koons’s Easyfun-Ethereal series in this video featuring Rebecca Sternthal, one of the organizers behind the most recent exhibition of these works in New York.

Rx Art

The Bigger Picture
Rx Art

Derek Blasberg speaks with Diane Brown, president and founder of RxArt, and with contributing artists Dan Colen, Urs Fischer, and Jeff Koons about the transformative power of visual art.

News

Jeff Koons, Cherubs, 1991 © Jeff Koons. Photo: Rob McKeever

Art Fair

TEFAF Online New York 2020
Jeff Koons

November 1–4, 2020

Gagosian is pleased to participate in TEFAF Online New York 2020 with a special presentation of Cherubs (1991) by Jeff Koons.

A wall sculpture in polychromed wood, Cherubs forms a key part of Koons’s renowned Made in Heaven series (1989–91) and merges his investigation of kitsch aesthetics and commodity culture with a veneration of Baroque craftsmanship—it was carved by artisans from the Bavarian village of Oberammergau. Making reference to the Rococo visions of Jean-Honoré Fragonard and François Boucher, and evoking the cavorting figures of Cupid or Eros, Cherubs combines the religious and the sensual, bringing divergent conceptions of taste and value into confrontation with one another.

Jeff Koons, Cherubs, 1991 © Jeff Koons. Photo: Rob McKeever