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Gagosian Quarterly

February 16, 2018

GagosianQuarterlySpring 2018

The Spring 2018 Gagosian Quarterly is now available and begins the year with a stunning new work by Ed Ruscha on its cover.

Detail from Ed Ruscha’s Our Flag (2017) on the cover of Gagosian Quarterly, Spring 2018

Detail from Ed Ruscha’s Our Flag (2017) on the cover of Gagosian Quarterly, Spring 2018

In this issue, Drew Gilpin Faust meditates on Sally Mann’s landscape photographs of Civil War battlefields; Timothy Baum writes about Man Ray’s emigration from Paris to Los Angeles during World War II; Takashi Murakami, collaborating with scholar Nobuo Tsuji, reinterprets the work of Edo period painter Soga Shōhaku; and Glenn Brown tells novelist Hari Kunzru about the ways in which the past breathes life into his newest works. Author Francine Prose, in the first installment of her four-part series, “The Lives of the Artists,” weaves a tale of a Venetian painter whose artistic talent is as much a curse as a gift. We also take a close look at Giuseppe Penone’s recent installation in the hills of Gstaad, Switzerland; the drawings of Richard Serra; and much more!

Order your copy or subscription at the Gagosian Shop, or read the issue online.

Cover © Ed Ruscha

Featuring Joan Jonas’s Mirror Piece 1 (1969) on its cover.

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Summer 2020

The Summer 2020 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring Joan Jonas’s Mirror Piece 1 (1969) on its cover.

Installation view, Crushed, Cast, Constructed: Sculpture by John Chamberlain, Urs Fischer, and Charles Ray, Gagosian, Grosvenor Hill, London, June 15–July 31, 2020

Uncanny Delights: Sculpture by John Chamberlain, Urs Fischer, and Charles Ray

Catalyzed by the exhibition Crushed, Cast, Constructed: Sculpture by John Chamberlain, Urs Fischer, and Charles Ray, Alice Godwin examines the legacy and development of a Surrealist ethos in selected works from three contemporary sculptors.

Black-and-white photograph of Alexander Calder and Margaret French dancing on a cobblestone street while Louisa Calder plays the accordion in front of a large window outside of James Thrall Soby’s house, Farmington, Connecticut, 1936

An Alphabetical Guide to Calder and Dance

Jed Perl takes a look at Alexander Calder’s lifelong fascination with dance and its relationship to his reimagining of sculpture.

David Reed, #714, 2014–19, acrylic, oil, and alkyd on polyester.

David Reed

David Reed and Katharina Grosse met at Reed’s New York studio in the fall of 2019 to talk about his newest paintings, the temporal aspects of both artists’ practice, and some of their mutual inspirations.

Installation view, "Katharina Grosse: Is It You?," Baltimore Museum of Art, March 1–June 28, 2020.

Katharina Grosse: The Movement Comes from Outside

Katharina Grosse discusses her exhibition Is It You? at the Baltimore Museum of Art with Gagosian’s Jona Lueddeckens. They consider what sets the Baltimore installation apart from its predecessors, and how Grosse sees the relationship of the human body to her immersive environments as opposed to her canvases.

Installation view, Katharina Grosse: Is It You?, Baltimore Museum of Art, March 1, 2020–January 3, 2021.

Katharina Grosse: I see what she did there

On the occasion of the artist’s exhibition at the Baltimore Museum of Art, Terry R. Myers muses on the manipulations of time in Grosse’s work.

The cover of the Spring 2020 edition of the Gagosian Quarterly magazine. A Cindy Sherman photograph of herself dressed as a clown against a rainbow background.

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Spring 2020

The Spring 2020 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring Cindy Sherman’s Untitled #412 (2003) on its cover.

Charlotte Perriand in her studio on place Saint-Sulpice, Paris, 1928. The hands holding a plate halolike behind her head are Le Corbusier’s.

The New World of Charlotte Perriand

Inspired by a visit to the Fondation Louis Vuitton’s exhibition Charlotte Perriand: Inventing a New World, William Middleton explores the life of this modernist pioneer and her impact on the worlds of design, art, and architecture.

Neil Jenney, North America Divided, 2001–06, oil on wood in artist’s frame, 26 ¼ × 28 ¼ × 2 ¾ inches (66.7 × 71.8 × 7 cm).

Neil Jenney’s Rules to Live By

The artist speaks with Douglas Dreishpoon about his career, his conception of the term “realism,” and why one must discover one’s own rules.

Vertical film strips from Man Ray's films.

The Films of Man Ray: Mysterious Encounters of Realities and Dreams

Timothy Baum muses on Man Ray’s foray into filmmaking in the 1920s, the subject of the exhibition Man Ray: The Mysteries of Château du Dé at Gagosian, San Francisco. 

Still from the video Giuseppe Penone at Fort Mason showing the artist's 2004 sculpture Idee di pietra (Ideas of Stone) installed at Fort Mason in San Francisco.

Giuseppe Penone at Fort Mason

A yearlong outdoor installation by Giuseppe Penone in San Francisco’s historic Fort Mason features two life-size bronze sculptures cast from fallen trees. The project continues the artist’s long investigation of the perpetual give-and-take between humans and nature. In this video, Penone discusses what drew him to this landscape and the concepts behind the installation.

Tatiana Trouvé, Between sky and earth, 2012–.

Tatiana Trouvé: In Time

In upstate New York, Jenny Jaskey discovers Tatiana Trouvé’s Between sky and earth. Begun in 2012, this multifaceted installation exists as a crucial nexus in the artist’s career, both a result of her ongoing practice and a generative source for continuing investigations.