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Donald Judd

Donald Judd, untitled, 1965 Galvanized iron, 6 × 27 × 24 inches (15.2 × 68.6 × 61 cm)© 2021 Judd Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Donald Judd, untitled, 1965

Galvanized iron, 6 × 27 × 24 inches (15.2 × 68.6 × 61 cm)
© 2021 Judd Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Donald Judd, untitled, 1978 Plywood, 19 ¾ × 39 ⅜ × 19 ¾ inches (50 × 100 × 50 cm)© 2021 Judd Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Donald Judd, untitled, 1978

Plywood, 19 ¾ × 39 ⅜ × 19 ¾ inches (50 × 100 × 50 cm)
© 2021 Judd Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Donald Judd, untitled, 1980 Plywood, 12 × 80 × 4 feet (3.7 × 24.4 × 1.2 m)© 2021 Judd Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Rob McKeever

Donald Judd, untitled, 1980

Plywood, 12 × 80 × 4 feet (3.7 × 24.4 × 1.2 m)
© 2021 Judd Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Rob McKeever

Donald Judd, untitled, 1991 Clear anodized aluminum with transparent amber over black acrylic sheets, 9 ⅞ × 39 ⅜ × 9 ⅞ inches (25 × 100 × 25 cm)© 2021 Judd Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Donald Judd, untitled, 1991

Clear anodized aluminum with transparent amber over black acrylic sheets, 9 ⅞ × 39 ⅜ × 9 ⅞ inches (25 × 100 × 25 cm)
© 2021 Judd Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

About

Donald Judd (1928–1994) produced visual and written work that shifted the course of modern art. Starting out as a painter in the 1950s, he began making three-dimensional works in the early 1960s, aiming to make objects that were free of the illusionism associated with painting. The aluminum, plexiglass, and plywood objects utilized the neutrality of their industrial mediums, and Judd’s production methods emphasized schematic variation and spatial definition through form. His interdisciplinary focus included architecture as well as furniture, and he was a prolific critic and essayist whose writing clarified his own artistic intentions as well as insightfully reflected on the work of his contemporaries.

Donald Judd was born in 1928 in Excelsior Springs, Missouri, and died in 1994 in New York. Collections include the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Tate, London; Museum Ludwig, Cologne, Germany; and Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum. Exhibitions include the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (1968 and 1988); Stedelijk Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven, Netherlands (1970, traveled to Museum Folkwang, Essen, Germany; Kunstverein Hannover, Germany; and Whitechapel Art Gallery, London); National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa (1975); and Tate Modern, London (2004, traveled to Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Düsseldorf, Germany; and Kunstmuseum Basel). Judd established Judd Foundation in 1977 to preserve his art, spaces, libraries, and archives in New York and in Marfa, Texas. He founded the Chinati Foundation/La Fundación Chinati in 1986 for the permanent installation of his and his contemporaries’ large-scale works. The Museum of Modern Art, New York, presented a major retrospective of Judd’s work from March 1, 2020, to January 9, 2021.

Donald Judd

Photo: Leo Holub, courtesy Judd Foundation Archives, Marfa, Texas

Fairs, Events & Announcements

Donald Judd in his architecture studio, Marfa, Texas, 1993. Artwork © 2021 Judd Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: © Laura Wilson

New Representation

Donald Judd and Judd Foundation

It is impossible to consider the history of American art without Donald Judd. He played an essential role in the development of modernism and was as respected by his peers as he is revered by artists working today. We got to know each other in New York in the early 1980s and he was one of the first artists whose work I really admired. The use of color and proportion, together with a unique combination of rigor and elegance, was incredibly powerful and remains essential today. Being a partner in realizing his vision and presenting his work as he intended is a great honor for me and the gallery.
—Larry Gagosian

Gagosian is pleased to announce the representation of the work of Donald Judd and Judd Foundation. The partnership underscores the gallery’s more than forty-year commitment to critical artists of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

Donald Judd in his architecture studio, Marfa, Texas, 1993. Artwork © 2021 Judd Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: © Laura Wilson

Still from “MoMA Virtual Views: Donald Judd”

Video

MoMA Virtual Views
Donald Judd

As we “museum from home,” exhibition curator Ann Temkin introduces the 2020 retrospective Judd at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Temkin discusses Donald Judd’s installation process and how the artist’s revolutionary approach has widened our understanding of sculpture for generations to come.

Still from “MoMA Virtual Views: Donald Judd”

Museum Exhibitions

Installation view, Donald Judd, Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 1, 2020–January 9, 2021. Artwork © 2020 Judd Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Closed

Donald Judd

March 1, 2020–January 9, 2021
Museum of Modern Art, New York
www.moma.org

Bringing together sculptures, paintings, drawings, and rarely seen works from throughout Donald Judd’s career, this exhibition is the first US retrospective in over thirty years to explore this artist’s remarkable vision.

Installation view, Donald Judd, Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 1, 2020–January 9, 2021. Artwork © 2020 Judd Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York