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Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter, Liegestuhl II (Deck Chair II), 1965 Oil on canvas, 39 ⅜ × 78 ¾ inches (100 × 200 cm)© Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter, Liegestuhl II (Deck Chair II), 1965

Oil on canvas, 39 ⅜ × 78 ¾ inches (100 × 200 cm)
© Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter, Landschaft mit Wolke (Landscape with Cloud), 1969 Oil on canvas, 35 ⅞ × 33 ⅞ inches (91 × 86 cm)© Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter, Landschaft mit Wolke (Landscape with Cloud), 1969

Oil on canvas, 35 ⅞ × 33 ⅞ inches (91 × 86 cm)
© Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter, Stadtbild (Townscape), 1969 Amphibolin on canvas, 27 ¾ × 27 ¾ inches (70.5 × 70.5 cm)© Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter, Stadtbild (Townscape), 1969

Amphibolin on canvas, 27 ¾ × 27 ¾ inches (70.5 × 70.5 cm)
© Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter, Grau (Grey), 1970 Oil on canvas, 39 ⅜ × 31 ½ inches (100 × 80 cm)© Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter, Grau (Grey), 1970

Oil on canvas, 39 ⅜ × 31 ½ inches (100 × 80 cm)
© Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter, Adler (Eagle), 1972 Oil on canvas, 31 ½ × 23 ⅝ inches (80 × 60 cm)© Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter, Adler (Eagle), 1972

Oil on canvas, 31 ½ × 23 ⅝ inches (80 × 60 cm)
© Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter, Abstraktes Bild (Abstract Painting), 1986 Oil on canvas, 31 ⅜ × 26 ⅜ inches (82 × 67 cm)© Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter, Abstraktes Bild (Abstract Painting), 1986

Oil on canvas, 31 ⅜ × 26 ⅜ inches (82 × 67 cm)
© Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter, Abstraktes Bild (Abstract Painting), 1990 Oil on canvas, 48 ⅛ × 40 ¼ inches (122 × 102 cm)© Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter, Abstraktes Bild (Abstract Painting), 1990

Oil on canvas, 48 ⅛ × 40 ¼ inches (122 × 102 cm)
© Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter, Demo, 1997 Oil on canvas, 24 ⅛ × 24 ⅛ inches (62 × 62 cm)© Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter, Demo, 1997

Oil on canvas, 24 ⅛ × 24 ⅛ inches (62 × 62 cm)
© Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter, Cage 2, 2006 Oil on canvas, 118 ⅛ × 118 ⅛ inches (300 × 300 cm)© Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter, Cage 2, 2006

Oil on canvas, 118 ⅛ × 118 ⅛ inches (300 × 300 cm)
© Gerhard Richter

About

Gerhard Richter was born in 1932 in Dresden, Germany. Throughout his career, Richter has negotiated the frontier between photography and painting, captivated by the way in which these two seemingly opposing practices speak to and challenge one another. From exuberant canvases rendered with a squeegee and acerbic color charts to paintings of photographic detail and close-ups of a single brushstroke, Richter moves effortlessly between the two mediums, reveling in the complexity of their relationship, while never asserting one above the other.

Richter’s life traces the defining moments of twentieth-century history and his work reverberates with the trauma of National Socialism and the Holocaust. In the wake of the Second World War, Richter trained in a Socialist Realist style sanctioned by East Germany’s Communist government. When he defected to West Germany in 1961, a month before the Berlin Wall was erected, Richter left his entire artistic oeuvre up to that point behind. From 1961 to 1964—alongside Blinky Palermo and Sigmar Polke—Richter studied at the Staatliche Kunstakademie Düsseldorf, where he began to explore the material, conceptual, and historical implications of painting without ideological restraint.

Richter’s earliest paintings in Düsseldorf, stimulated by a fascination with current affairs and popular culture, responded to images from magazines and newspaper cuttings. Through the 1960s, Richter continued to address found and media images of subjects such as military jets, portraits, and aerial photographs. Notably, he reimagined family pictures he had smuggled from East Germany that included his smiling uncle Rudi, dressed in a Nazi uniform, and aunt Marianne, who Richter later discovered had been murdered in a mental institution during the Third Reich. Richter’s idiosyncratic technique of blurring made such complex moments of personal and social history seem to crackle with static, distancing the viewer from their subjects and casting doubt on the ability of painting to document in the same way as photography. In 1967, Richter was awarded the Junger Western art prize and began to expand his series of, what have come to be known as, Farbtafeln (Color Charts) (1966–2008) and Graue Bilder (Gray Paintings) (1966–2014). Richter was drawn to the tonal nuances of gray as well as the hue’s conceptual rigor—seemingly stripped of feeling and association. In 1972, Richter was chosen to represent West Germany at the Venice Biennale. That same year, he exhibited at Documenta in Kassel, Germany, where he showed again in 1977, 1982, and 1987.

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Fairs, Events & Announcements

Jeff Koons, Bluebird Planter, 2010–16 © Jeff Koons

Art Fair

FIAC Online 2021
Printemps oublié

March 2–12, 2021

Gagosian is pleased to present Printemps oublié for the first online edition of FIAC. This curated presentation reflects the dual character of springtime as a reminder of past trials and the harbinger of a vibrant new season to come.

All the artworks will appear on the Gagosian website and a rotating selection will appear in the inaugural FIAC Online Viewing Rooms, from March 4 to 7.

Jeff Koons, Bluebird Planter, 2010–16 © Jeff Koons

Rembrandt van Rijn, Self-Portrait with Two Circles, c. 1665, English Heritage, The Iveagh Bequest (Kenwood, London). Photo: Historic England Photo Library

Tour

Visions of the Self: Rembrandt and Now
In partnership with English Heritage

Thursday, April 25, 2019, 6pm
Gagosian, Grosvenor Hill, London

Gagosian director and art historian Richard Calvocoressi will lead a tour of the exhibition Visions of the Self: Rembrandt and Now at Gagosian, Grosvenor Hill, London. Calvocoressi will take a look at postwar and contemporary masters of self-representation, anchoring the conversation to an important Rembrandt masterpiece included in the exhibition, Self-Portrait with Two Circles (c. 1665). The event has reached capacity. To join the wait list, contact londontours@gagosian.com.

Rembrandt van Rijn, Self-Portrait with Two Circles, c. 1665, English Heritage, The Iveagh Bequest (Kenwood, London). Photo: Historic England Photo Library

Museum Exhibitions

Rachel Whiteread, Untitled, 2010, installation view, Flughafen Tempelhof, Berlin © Rachel Whiteread

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Diversity United
Contemporary European Art

June 9–October 10, 2021
Flughafen Tempelhof, Berlin
www.stiftungkunst.de

Presenting work by more than ninety established and emerging artists from thirty-four countries, Diversity United reflects the diversity and vitality of Europe’s contemporary art scene. The exhibition, which will travel to venues in Moscow and Paris, sheds light on subjects such as freedom, democracy, migration, territory, and political and personal identity. Work by Georg Baselitz, Anselm Kiefer, Gerhard Richter, Tatiana Trouvé, and Rachel Whiteread is included.

Rachel Whiteread, Untitled, 2010, installation view, Flughafen Tempelhof, Berlin © Rachel Whiteread

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Gerhard Richter
Landschaft

March 26–July 25, 2021
Kunsthaus Zürich
www.kunsthaus.ch

This exhibition, whose title translates to Landscape, offers a comprehensive retrospective of Gerhard Richter’s landscapes, including numerous oil paintings, drawings, collages, overpainted photographs, prints, artist’s books, and objects that reflect the theme from the 1960s until today. The show has traveled from the Kunstforum Wien in Vienna.

Glenn Brown, Lemon Sunshine, 2001 © Glenn Brown

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00s. Collection Cranford
Les années 2000

October 24, 2020–May 30, 2021
Mo.Co. Contemporary, Montpellier, France
www.moco.art

This exhibition of work from the Cranford Collection, established by Muriel and Freddy Salem in 1999, aims to define the identity of the 2000s by creating a dialogue between one hundred artworks by a multigenerational array of artists who contributed to shaping the beginning of the millennium. Work by Glenn Brown, Damien Hirst, Mike Kelley, Albert Oehlen, Gerhard Richter, Ed Ruscha, Cindy Sherman, Jeff Wall, Franz West, and Christopher Wool is included.

Glenn Brown, Lemon Sunshine, 2001 © Glenn Brown

Gerhard Richter, Waldhaus (House in Forest), 2004 © Gerhard Richter 2020

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Gerhard Richter
Landschaft

October 1, 2020–March 7, 2021
Kunstforum Wien, Vienna
www.kunstforumwien.at

This exhibition, whose title translates to Landscape, offers a comprehensive retrospective of Gerhard Richter’s landscapes, including numerous oil paintings, drawings, printed graphics, photography, artist’s books, and objects that reflect the theme from the 1960s until today.

Gerhard Richter, Waldhaus (House in Forest), 2004 © Gerhard Richter 2020

See all Museum Exhibitions for Gerhard Richter