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Glenn Brown

February 24–April 10, 2004
980 Madison Avenue, New York

Glenn Brown Installation view

Glenn Brown

Installation view

Glenn Brown Installation view

Glenn Brown

Installation view

Glenn Brown Installation view

Glenn Brown

Installation view

Glenn Brown Installation view

Glenn Brown

Installation view

Glenn Brown Installation view

Glenn Brown

Installation view

Works Exhibited

Glenn Brown, Sex, 2003 Oil on panel, 49 ⅝ × 33 ½ inches (126 × 85.1 cm)

Glenn Brown, Sex, 2003

Oil on panel, 49 ⅝ × 33 ½ inches (126 × 85.1 cm)

Glenn Brown, Death Disco, 2004 Oil on panel, 52 ¾ × 35 inches (134 × 88.9 cm)

Glenn Brown, Death Disco, 2004

Oil on panel, 52 ¾ × 35 inches (134 × 88.9 cm)

Glenn Brown, America, 2004 Oil on panel, 55 ⅛ × 36 ¾ inches (140 × 93.3 cm)

Glenn Brown, America, 2004

Oil on panel, 55 ⅛ × 36 ¾ inches (140 × 93.3 cm)

Glenn Brown, Architecture and Morality, 2004 Oil on panel, 55 ⅛ × 38 ⅝ inches (140 × 98.1 cm)

Glenn Brown, Architecture and Morality, 2004

Oil on panel, 55 ⅛ × 38 ⅝ inches (140 × 98.1 cm)

About

Color and its myriad of combinations always amaze me. To paint the expression of a face and to change that expression, from happy to sad by one miniscule change in the shadow of an eye, makes one never want to do anything else.
—Glenn Brown

Gagosian is pleased to present Glenn Brown’s first solo exhibition in New York, featuring recent paintings and sculptures.

On view will be seven new paintings, in which the artist continues his practice of appropriating figures and subjects from art-historical precedents and transforming them into something new. This body of work merges painted copies of old master paintings with references to film, literature, and music. Brown collapses the barriers that distinguish “high” art from “low” culture and fuses together images from different historical eras and cultural practices, resulting in visual hybrids that confront the viewer with an imaginary world. Through the reinterpreted brushwork, manipulation of color, addition of detail, and use of titles, Brown provides commentary on the issue of the original “artwork” and the profusion of its reproductions within artistic practice and everyday life. Also on view are two new sculptures made of paint and plaster. These three-dimensional works function as extensions of the paintings, employing color, form, and movement in a painterly manner.