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Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, “The Pornography of Death”—Painting for Ian Curtis (copied from “Floating Cities” 1981 by Chris Foss), 1995 Oil on canvas, 86 ½ × 129 ¼ inches (220 × 328 cm)© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, “The Pornography of Death”—Painting for Ian Curtis (copied from “Floating Cities” 1981 by Chris Foss), 1995

Oil on canvas, 86 ½ × 129 ¼ inches (220 × 328 cm)
© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, You Take My Place in This Showdown, 1996 Oil on canvas, 84 ⅝ × 126 ¾ inches (214.9 × 321.9 cm)© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, You Take My Place in This Showdown, 1996

Oil on canvas, 84 ⅝ × 126 ¾ inches (214.9 × 321.9 cm)
© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, The Loves of Shepherds (after “Doublestar” by Tony Roberts), 2000 Oil on canvas, 86 ½ × 132 ¼ inches (219.5 × 336 cm)© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, The Loves of Shepherds (after “Doublestar” by Tony Roberts), 2000

Oil on canvas, 86 ½ × 132 ¼ inches (219.5 × 336 cm)
© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, Dirty, 2003 Oil on panel, 41 ¼ × 32 ¾ inches (105 × 83 cm)© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, Dirty, 2003

Oil on panel, 41 ¼ × 32 ¾ inches (105 × 83 cm)
© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, Architecture and Morality, 2004 Oil on panel, 55 ⅛ × 38 ⅝ inches (140 × 98 cm)© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, Architecture and Morality, 2004

Oil on panel, 55 ⅛ × 38 ⅝ inches (140 × 98 cm)
© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, Wild Horses, 2007 Oil on panel, 52 ⅜ × 40 ¼ inches (133 × 102 cm)© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, Wild Horses, 2007

Oil on panel, 52 ⅜ × 40 ¼ inches (133 × 102 cm)
© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, Suffer Well, 2007 Oil on panel, 61 ⅞ × 47 ¼ inches (157 × 120 cm)© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, Suffer Well, 2007

Oil on panel, 61 ⅞ × 47 ¼ inches (157 × 120 cm)
© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, Some Velvet Morning When I’m Straight I'm Going to Open Up Your Gates, 2007 Oil on panel, 87 ⅜ × 58 ⅜ inches (222 × 148 cm)© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, Some Velvet Morning When I’m Straight I'm Going to Open Up Your Gates, 2007

Oil on panel, 87 ⅜ × 58 ⅜ inches (222 × 148 cm)
© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, Wooden Heart, 2008 Oil paint on acrylic medium on metal armature, 35 × 58 ⅜ × 27 ⅝ inches (89 × 148 × 70 cm)© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, Wooden Heart, 2008

Oil paint on acrylic medium on metal armature, 35 × 58 ⅜ × 27 ⅝ inches (89 × 148 × 70 cm)
© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, Christina of Denmark, 2008 Oil on panel, 65 × 46 ⅞ inches (165 × 119 cm)© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, Christina of Denmark, 2008

Oil on panel, 65 × 46 ⅞ inches (165 × 119 cm)
© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, Burlesque, 2008 Oil on panel, 48 ¼ × 79 ⅞ inches (122.5 × 203 cm)© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, Burlesque, 2008

Oil on panel, 48 ¼ × 79 ⅞ inches (122.5 × 203 cm)
© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, Layered Portrait (after Urs Graf) 1, 2008 Etching on Velin Arches 300gsm paper, 15 ⅞ × 11 ⅞ inches (40.5 × 30 cm), edition of 30© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, Layered Portrait (after Urs Graf) 1, 2008

Etching on Velin Arches 300gsm paper, 15 ⅞ × 11 ⅞ inches (40.5 × 30 cm), edition of 30
© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, Spearmint Rhino, 2009 Oil on panel, 76 ½ × 102 ½ inches (194 × 260 cm)© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, Spearmint Rhino, 2009

Oil on panel, 76 ½ × 102 ½ inches (194 × 260 cm)
© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, Star Dust, 2009 Oil on panel, 60 ¾ × 48 inches (154 × 122 cm)© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, Star Dust, 2009

Oil on panel, 60 ¾ × 48 inches (154 × 122 cm)
© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, Cactus Land, 2012 Oil on panel, 67 × 55 ⅞ inches (170 × 142 cm)© Glenn Brown. Photo: Mike Bruce

Glenn Brown, Cactus Land, 2012

Oil on panel, 67 × 55 ⅞ inches (170 × 142 cm)
© Glenn Brown. Photo: Mike Bruce

Glenn Brown, Drawing 39 (after Greuze), 2014 India ink on Pergamenata paper, 19 ¾ × 13 ¾ inches (50 × 35 cm)© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, Drawing 39 (after Greuze), 2014

India ink on Pergamenata paper, 19 ¾ × 13 ¾ inches (50 × 35 cm)
© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, Marie Berna/Die Toteninsel (The Isle of the Dead), 2014 Oil on panel, 63 × 39 ⅜ inches (160 × 100 cm)© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, Marie Berna/Die Toteninsel (The Isle of the Dead), 2014

Oil on panel, 63 × 39 ⅜ inches (160 × 100 cm)
© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, The Glory of Spain, 2014 Oil paint over acrylic paint and bronze, 49 ¼ × 28 ⅜ × 28 ⅜ inches (125 × 72 × 72 cm)© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, The Glory of Spain, 2014

Oil paint over acrylic paint and bronze, 49 ¼ × 28 ⅜ × 28 ⅜ inches (125 × 72 × 72 cm)
© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, Woman II, 2015 Oil paint over acrylic, steel structure and bronze with marble base and vitrine, 38 ⅝ × 13 ¾ × 13 ¾ inches (98 × 35 × 35 cm)© Glenn Brown. Photo: Mike Bruce

Glenn Brown, Woman II, 2015

Oil paint over acrylic, steel structure and bronze with marble base and vitrine, 38 ⅝ × 13 ¾ × 13 ¾ inches (98 × 35 × 35 cm)
© Glenn Brown. Photo: Mike Bruce

Glenn Brown, Drawing 36 (after Flinck), 2015 India ink and acrylic on panel, 33 ¾ × 23 ⅝ inches (85.5 × 60 cm)© Glenn Brown. Photo: Prudence Cuming Associates Ltd

Glenn Brown, Drawing 36 (after Flinck), 2015

India ink and acrylic on panel, 33 ¾ × 23 ⅝ inches (85.5 × 60 cm)
© Glenn Brown. Photo: Prudence Cuming Associates Ltd

Glenn Brown, Drawing 6 (after Murillo/Murillo), 2015 India ink and acrylic on beech plywood panel, 30 × 19 ⅞ inches (76.1 × 50.5 cm)© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, Drawing 6 (after Murillo/Murillo), 2015

India ink and acrylic on beech plywood panel, 30 × 19 ⅞ inches (76.1 × 50.5 cm)
© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, On the Way to the Leisure Centre, 2017 Oil on panel, 48 ⅛ × 96 ⅛ inches (122 × 244 cm)© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, On the Way to the Leisure Centre, 2017

Oil on panel, 48 ⅛ × 96 ⅛ inches (122 × 244 cm)
© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, Children of the Revolution (after Rembrandt), 2017 India ink and acrylic on polyester film over cardboard, in Italian 17th-century carved and gilded overlapping leaf frame with later gilded arch-topped spandrel, 42 ¾ × 27 ¾ × 2 ⅛ inches (108.5 × 70.5 × 5.5 cm)© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, Children of the Revolution (after Rembrandt), 2017

India ink and acrylic on polyester film over cardboard, in Italian 17th-century carved and gilded overlapping leaf frame with later gilded arch-topped spandrel, 42 ¾ × 27 ¾ × 2 ⅛ inches (108.5 × 70.5 × 5.5 cm)
© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, Drawing 1 (after Bloemaert), 2018 India ink and acrylic on film over panel, in likely Genoese 17th-century fully carved frame with scrolling leaves, 30 ¾ × 35 ⅛ × 2 ⅜ inches (78 × 89.3 × 6 cm)© Glenn Brown

Glenn Brown, Drawing 1 (after Bloemaert), 2018

India ink and acrylic on film over panel, in likely Genoese 17th-century fully carved frame with scrolling leaves, 30 ¾ × 35 ⅛ × 2 ⅜ inches (78 × 89.3 × 6 cm)
© Glenn Brown

About

I like my paintings to have one foot in the grave, to be not quite of this world. For me they exist in a dream world, a world that is made up of all the accumulated images stored in our subconscious that coagulate and mutate when we sleep.
—Glenn Brown

Mining art history and popular culture, Glenn Brown has created an artistic language that eschews categorization, fusing a wide range of time periods and pictorial conventions through reference, appropriation, and precise attention to detail. His mannerist impulses stem from a desire to breathe new life into history, using its forms as vehicles for his exploration of paint.

As an art student at Goldsmiths College, London, in the 1980s, Brown wrestled with the idea that painting had reached its end, as artists, critics, and scholars were then proclaiming. Seeking a future for painting despite its historical baggage, he made illusionistic versions of the thickly painted works of Frank Auerbach and Karel Appel, rendering their layered impasto in smoothly detailed two-dimensional brushstrokes.

Brown sources images from the internet, books, and other printed materials, distorting and manipulating them. In the 1990s he created several paintings based on science fiction novels drawing inspiration from sci-fi illustrations of the 1970s and 1980s, as well as the apocalyptic scenes created by painter and illustrator John Martin. In these works Brown combined panoramic and close-up views, a technique he would later apply to depictions of the body and flesh, alluding to works by Salvador Dalí, Willem de Kooning, Chaim Soutine, and others.

As a complement to his painting practice, he creates sculptures by accumulating thick layers of oil paint over structures or found bronze casts. Brown has also produced detailed drawings in which he further explores the uncanny juxtapositions seen in his paintings. Since 2013 he has increased his engagement with drawing’s tactility, using different types of lines, shadings, and strokes in order to reinterpret the age-old tradition of copying historical subjects as a learning tool. His drawings reinforce the importance of gesture, echoing the layered lines of Old Master sketches.

Many of Brown’s titles make reference to literature, film, or individuals. Though not overtly related to the content of the paintings, drawings, and sculptures they name, the titles assert a directness that parallels Brown’s subject matter. In this way, he combines textual and visual reference as a means to update art history and perception.

Exhibitions such as the British Museum’s Historical Baggage: Glenn Brown and His Sources (2018) have made the links between Brown’s works and those from which he draws inspiration even more apparent. The show paired early portraits based on prints by Rembrandt van Rijn and Lucian Freud with Brown’s 2012 series Half-Life, a new engagement with Rembrandt’s work, revealing Brown’s intricate technical evolution over the past decade.

Fairs, Events & Announcements

Glenn Brown: Come to Dust (London: Gagosian, 2018)

Online Reading

Glenn Brown
Come to Dust

Glenn Brown: Come to Dust is available for online reading from April 28 through May 27 as part of Artist Spotlight: Glenn Brown. The book documents a 2018 exhibition at Gagosian, Grosvenor Hill, London, which featured oil paintings, drawings in period frames, grisaille panel works, etchings, and sculptures that attest to the ever-intensifying dexterity with which Brown employs paint, content, and form. A text by author Hari Kunzru and a conversation between Brown and curator Xavier Bray offer insight into the artist’s work.

Glenn Brown: Come to Dust (London: Gagosian, 2018)

Photo: Edgar Laguinia

Artist Spotlight

Glenn Brown

April 28–May 4, 2021

Mining art history and popular culture, Glenn Brown has created an artistic language that refuses categorization, combining a wide range of periods from art history through reference, appropriation, and precise attention to detail. His mannerist impulses stem from a desire to breathe new life into past images; they are treasuries of raw material, offering countless images, titles, and techniques to be combined and deconstructed, producing complex and sensuous works of art that are resolutely of our time.

Photo: Edgar Laguinia

Jeff Koons, Bluebird Planter, 2010–16 © Jeff Koons

Art Fair

FIAC Online 2021
Printemps oublié

March 2–12, 2021

Gagosian is pleased to present Printemps oublié for the first online edition of FIAC. This curated presentation reflects the dual character of springtime as a reminder of past trials and the harbinger of a vibrant new season to come.

All the artworks will appear on the Gagosian website and a rotating selection will appear in the inaugural FIAC Online Viewing Rooms, from March 4 to 7.

Jeff Koons, Bluebird Planter, 2010–16 © Jeff Koons

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Museum Exhibitions

Ewa Juszkiewicz, Untitled (After Elisabeth Vigée Le Brun), 2020 © Ewa Juszkiewicz

On View

Face à Arcimboldo

Through November 22, 2021
Centre Pompidou-Metz, France
www.centrepompidou-metz.fr

This exhibition, whose title translates to Arcimboldo Face to Face, invites visitors to explore the timeless vocabulary of the sixteenth-century painter Giuseppe Arcimboldo (c. 1527–1593). The show demonstrates how his work has influenced art history for more than four centuries through the work of 130 artists, including work by Francis Bacon, Glenn Brown, Alex Israel, Ewa Juszkiewicz, Roy Lichtenstein, Man Ray, Pablo Picasso, Auguste Rodin, and Ed Ruscha.

Ewa Juszkiewicz, Untitled (After Elisabeth Vigée Le Brun), 2020 © Ewa Juszkiewicz

Glenn Brown, Lemon Sunshine, 2001 © Glenn Brown

Closed

00s. Collection Cranford
Les années 2000

October 24, 2020–May 30, 2021
Mo.Co. Contemporary, Montpellier, France
www.moco.art

This exhibition of work from the Cranford Collection, established by Muriel and Freddy Salem in 1999, aims to define the identity of the 2000s by creating a dialogue between one hundred artworks by a multigenerational array of artists who contributed to shaping the beginning of the millennium. Work by Glenn Brown, Damien Hirst, Mike Kelley, Albert Oehlen, Gerhard Richter, Ed Ruscha, Cindy Sherman, Jeff Wall, Franz West, and Christopher Wool is included.

Glenn Brown, Lemon Sunshine, 2001 © Glenn Brown

Installation view, Inspiraatio—Nykytaide & Klassikot, Ateneum, Finnish National Gallery, Helsinki, June 18–September 20, 2020. Artwork, left to right: © Glenn Brown, © Wolfe von Lenkiewicz. Photo: Hannu Pakarinen

Closed

Inspiraatio—Nykytaide & Klassikot

June 18–September 20, 2020
Ateneum, Finnish National Gallery, Helsinki
ateneum.fi

This exhibition, whose title translates to Inspiration—Contemporary Art and Classics, explores contemporary art inspired by iconic masterpieces. Here, the original works are referenced through replicas, prints, plaster casts, and an abundance of archival materials. This exhibition has traveled from the Nationalmuseum, Stockholm, under the title Inspiration: Iconic Works. Work by Georg Baselitz, Glenn Brown, Jeff Koons, and Jenny Saville is included.

Installation view, Inspiraatio—Nykytaide & Klassikot, Ateneum, Finnish National Gallery, Helsinki, June 18–September 20, 2020. Artwork, left to right: © Glenn Brown, © Wolfe von Lenkiewicz. Photo: Hannu Pakarinen

Glenn Brown, Layered Portrait (after Lucian Freud) 4, 2008 © Glenn Brown

Closed

(Re)Print
Five Projects

April 30–June 20, 2020
International Print Center New York
www.ipcny.org

This online exhibition, centered on works by Mark Bradford, Cecily Brown, Glenn Brown, Enrique Chagoya, and Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, opens a dialogue between contemporary prints and the source material referenced. (Re)Print examines how artists revise, recontextualize, and personalize familiar imagery to elicit new thinking. Further, the pairings express the dynamic relationship between contemporary practice and the historical role that prints have played in image reproduction and dissemination, and in the shaping of history, culture, and beliefs.

Glenn Brown, Layered Portrait (after Lucian Freud) 4, 2008 © Glenn Brown

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Press

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