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Robert Rauschenberg

Jammers

February 16–March 28, 2013
Britannia Street, London

Installation view, photo by Mike Bruce

Installation view, photo by Mike Bruce

Installation view Photo by Mike Bruce

Installation view Photo by Mike Bruce

Installation view Photo by Mike Bruce

Installation view Photo by Mike Bruce

Installation view Photo by Mike Bruce

Installation view Photo by Mike Bruce

Installation view Photo by Mike Bruce

Installation view Photo by Mike Bruce

Installation view Photo by Mike Bruce

Installation view Photo by Mike Bruce

Installation view Photo by Mike Bruce

Installation view Photo by Mike Bruce

Installation view Photo by Mike Bruce

Installation view Photo by Mike Bruce

Installation view Photo by Mike Bruce

Installation view Photo by Mike Bruce

Installation view Photo by Mike Bruce

Installation view Photo by Mike Bruce

Installation view Photo by Mike Bruce

Installation view Photo by Mike Bruce

Installation view Photo by Mike Bruce

Installation view Photo by Mike Bruce

Installation view Photo by Mike Bruce

Installation view Photo by Mike Bruce

Works Exhibited

Robert Rauschenberg, Quarterhouse (Jammer), 1975 Sewn fabric and cloth-covered rattan poles, 59 ½ × 168 ½ inches (151.1 × 428 cm)© The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation 2013/Licensed by VAGA, New York

Robert Rauschenberg, Quarterhouse (Jammer), 1975

Sewn fabric and cloth-covered rattan poles, 59 ½ × 168 ½ inches (151.1 × 428 cm)
© The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation 2013/Licensed by VAGA, New York

Robert Rauschenberg, Quarterhouse (Jammer), 1975 (detail) Sewn fabric and cloth-covered rattan poles, 59 ½ × 168 ½ inches (151.1 × 428 cm)© The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation 2013/Licensed by VAGA, New York

Robert Rauschenberg, Quarterhouse (Jammer), 1975 (detail)

Sewn fabric and cloth-covered rattan poles, 59 ½ × 168 ½ inches (151.1 × 428 cm)
© The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation 2013/Licensed by VAGA, New York

Robert Rauschenberg, Mirage (Jammer), 1975 Sewn fabric, 80 × 69 inches (203.2 × 175.3 cm)© The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation 2013/Licensed by VAGA, New York

Robert Rauschenberg, Mirage (Jammer), 1975

Sewn fabric, 80 × 69 inches (203.2 × 175.3 cm)
© The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation 2013/Licensed by VAGA, New York

Robert Rauschenberg, Mirage (Jammer), 1975 (detail) Sewn fabric, 80 × 69 inches (203.2 × 175.3 cm)© The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation 2013/Licensed by VAGA, New York

Robert Rauschenberg, Mirage (Jammer), 1975 (detail)

Sewn fabric, 80 × 69 inches (203.2 × 175.3 cm)
© The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation 2013/Licensed by VAGA, New York

Robert Rauschenberg, Untitled (Jammer), 1975 Sewn fabric with rattan pole, twine, and tin cans, 100 × 36 × 27 inches (254 × 91.4 × 68.6 cm)© The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation 2013/Licensed by VAGA, New York

Robert Rauschenberg, Untitled (Jammer), 1975

Sewn fabric with rattan pole, twine, and tin cans, 100 × 36 × 27 inches (254 × 91.4 × 68.6 cm)
© The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation 2013/Licensed by VAGA, New York

Robert Rauschenberg, Untitled (Jammer), 1975 (detail) Sewn fabric with rattan pole, twine, and tin cans, 100 × 36 × 27 inches (254 × 91.4 × 68.6 cm)© The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation 2013/Licensed by VAGA, New York

Robert Rauschenberg, Untitled (Jammer), 1975 (detail)

Sewn fabric with rattan pole, twine, and tin cans, 100 × 36 × 27 inches (254 × 91.4 × 68.6 cm)
© The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation 2013/Licensed by VAGA, New York

About

Even though the [Jammers] are still quite romantic, my job was to impose a great amount of restraint upon myself…Nearly everything that I could think to do previously would have violated what these pieces wanted to be. And so with the fabrics, it was another kind of adventure, almost like going out and picking up garbage.
—Robert Rauschenberg

Gagosian Gallery is pleased to present Robert Rauschenberg’s Jammers.

Rauschenberg’s protean oeuvre ushered in a new era of postwar American art in the wake of Abstract Expressionism, with a free and experimental approach that drew inspiration from conceptual, materialist, and gestural approaches to art making. His restlessly inventive spirit pushed him to explore a wealth of materials and processes, thus collapsing the distinctions between medium, genre, abstraction and representation, while his invention of the “flatbed picture plane” forever changed the relationship between artist, image, and viewer.

In the early 1970s, Rauschenberg moved his permanent studio from New York City to Captiva Island, off the Gulf coast of Florida (Today, this site is in use as the artists’ residency program of the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation). This relocation marked a shift from the gritty urban detritus that had been the basis of much of the earlier work to a rhapsodic embrace of color and geometric abstraction in a wholly new vernacular language. The Jammers series (1975–76), its title a direct reference to the Windjammer sailing vessel, is Rauschenberg’s salute to his new island life. In 1975, he also went to India to investigate textiles and papermaking, and the inspiration of this new and exotic context is evident in the use of vivid colors and nuanced textures of cotton, muslin, and silk.

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