Menu Skip to content

Extended through August 18, 2017

Jeff Koons

April 27–August 18, 2017
Beverly Hills

Installation video

Installation video

Installation view Artwork © Jeff Koons. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen

Installation view

Artwork © Jeff Koons. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen

Installation view Artwork © Jeff Koons. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen

Installation view

Artwork © Jeff Koons. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen

Installation view Artwork © Jeff Koons. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen

Installation view

Artwork © Jeff Koons. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen

Installation view Artwork © Jeff Koons. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen

Installation view

Artwork © Jeff Koons. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen

Works Exhibited

Jeff Koons, Gazing Ball (David Intervention of the Sabine Women), 2016 Oil on canvas, glass, and aluminum, 65 × 88 ¼ × 14 ¾ inches (165.1 × 224.2 × 37.5 cm)© Jeff Koons

Jeff Koons, Gazing Ball (David Intervention of the Sabine Women), 2016

Oil on canvas, glass, and aluminum, 65 × 88 ¼ × 14 ¾ inches (165.1 × 224.2 × 37.5 cm)
© Jeff Koons

Jeff Koons, Gazing Ball (Manet Luncheon on the Grass), 2014–15 Oil on canvas, glass, and aluminum, 63 × 81 ¼ × 14 ¾ inches (160 × 206.4 × 37.5 cm)© Jeff Koons

Jeff Koons, Gazing Ball (Manet Luncheon on the Grass), 2014–15

Oil on canvas, glass, and aluminum, 63 × 81 ¼ × 14 ¾ inches (160 × 206.4 × 37.5 cm)
© Jeff Koons

Jeff Koons, Ballerinas, 2010–14 Mirror-polished stainless steel with transparent color coating, 100 × 70 × 62 inches (254 × 177.8 × 157.5 cm)© Jeff Koons. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen

Jeff Koons, Ballerinas, 2010–14

Mirror-polished stainless steel with transparent color coating, 100 × 70 × 62 inches (254 × 177.8 × 157.5 cm)
© Jeff Koons. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen

Jeff Koons, Gazing Ball (Farnese Hercules), 2013 Plaster and glass, 128 ½ × 67 × 48 ⅝ inches (326.4 × 170 × 123.5 cm)© Jeff Koons

Jeff Koons, Gazing Ball (Farnese Hercules), 2013

Plaster and glass, 128 ½ × 67 × 48 ⅝ inches (326.4 × 170 × 123.5 cm)
© Jeff Koons

Jeff Koons, Gazing Ball (Mailbox), 2013 Plaster and glass, 74 ¼ × 24 ⅜ × 41 ½ inches (188.6 × 61.9 × 105.4 cm)© Jeff Koons

Jeff Koons, Gazing Ball (Mailbox), 2013

Plaster and glass, 74 ¼ × 24 ⅜ × 41 ½ inches (188.6 × 61.9 × 105.4 cm)
© Jeff Koons

Jeff Koons, Balloon Rabbit (Magenta), 2005–10 Mirror–polished stainless steel with transparent color coating, 168 × 107 × 80 ¾ inches (426.7 × 271.8 × 205.1 cm)© Jeff Koons. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen

Jeff Koons, Balloon Rabbit (Magenta), 2005–10

Mirror–polished stainless steel with transparent color coating, 168 × 107 × 80 ¾ inches (426.7 × 271.8 × 205.1 cm)
© Jeff Koons. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen

Jeff Koons, Bluebird Planter, 2010–16 Mirror-polished stainless steel with transparent color coating, and live flowering plants, 82 ½ × 110 ¾ × 40 inches (209.6 × 281.3 × 101.6 cm), edition of 3 + 1 AP© Jeff Koons. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen

Jeff Koons, Bluebird Planter, 2010–16

Mirror-polished stainless steel with transparent color coating, and live flowering plants, 82 ½ × 110 ¾ × 40 inches (209.6 × 281.3 × 101.6 cm), edition of 3 + 1 AP
© Jeff Koons. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen

About

I like to think that when you leave the room, the art leaves the room. Art is about your own possibilities as a human being. It’s about your own excitement, your own potential, and what you can become. It affirms your existence.
—Jeff Koons

Gagosian is pleased to present an exhibition of recent and new work by Jeff Koons.

Making use of conceptual constructs including the ancient, the everyday, and the sublime, Koons creates luxurious icons and elaborate tableaux, which, beneath their captivating exteriors, engage the viewer in a metaphysical dialogue with cultural history.

Koons draws attention to the continuity of images as they pass through time. The Gazing Ball series is grounded in distinctive narratives and art-historical precedents—from ancient classical sculpture to Rubens and Manet. In each work, a blue mirrored, hand-blown glass gazing ball—a convention from eighteenth-century garden design—reflects its surroundings, uniting painting, sculpture, and architecture in order to multiply sensory experience. Balanced on the shoulder of Hercules, or introducing a dose of the surreal to the suburban harmony of a row of mailboxes, each gazing ball reactivates and intensifies familiar scenes, whether from legend or the everyday.

Read more

From the Quarterly

Jeff Koons: Easyfun-Ethereal

Jeff Koons: Easyfun-Ethereal

Learn more about Jeff Koons’s Easyfun-Ethereal series in this video featuring Rebecca Sternthal, one of the organizers behind the most recent exhibition of these works in New York.

Rx Art

The Bigger Picture
Rx Art

Derek Blasberg speaks with Diane Brown, president and founder of RxArt, and with contributing artists Dan Colen, Urs Fischer, and Jeff Koons about the transformative power of visual art.

Jeff Koons

The Bigger Picture
Jeff Koons

Jeff Koons speaks with Alison McDonald and Maura Harty about his longstanding commitment to protecting the rights of children.

Jeff Koons Glenn Fuhrman

In Conversation
Jeff Koons Glenn Fuhrman

The FLAG Art Foundation hosted a conversation between Jeff Koons and FLAG founder Glenn Fuhrman, in which the two discuss the dichotomy between sexuality and childhood innocence in Koons’s oeuvre, remaking Made in Heaven with Lady Gaga, what drives Koons to make more work, and several works including Cat on a Clothesline (1994–2001) and Winter Bears (1988).

The Last 36 Hours

The Last 36 Hours

Derek Blasberg speaks with Scott Rothkopf, a curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art, about the last thirty-six hours of the Jeff Koons retrospective, which also marked the end of the museum’s tenure in uptown Manhattan.

Split-Rocker: A Landscaping Perspective

Split-Rocker: A Landscaping Perspective

Jeff Koons’s flowering sculpture Split-Rocker, at once imposing and adorable, has cast a spell on New York City’s Rockefeller Center. Derek Blasberg interviews Matt Donham, Koons’s landscape designer on the project, to find out more.