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Extended through June 27, 2020

Duino Elegies

March 5–June 27, 2020
980 Madison Avenue, New York

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Installation video

Installation view Artwork, left to right: Medardo Rosso; Paul Cezanne; Auguste Rodin, © Cy Twombly Foundation; © 2020 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: Medardo Rosso; Paul Cezanne; Auguste Rodin, © Cy Twombly Foundation; © 2020 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork © Anselm Kiefer. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Anselm Kiefer. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © Anselm Kiefer; Medardo Rosso. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © Anselm Kiefer; Medardo Rosso. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork, left to right: Medardo Rosso; Paul Cezanne. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: Medardo Rosso; Paul Cezanne. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork, left to right: Medardo Rosso, Paul Cezanne, Auguste Rodin, © Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: Medardo Rosso, Paul Cezanne, Auguste Rodin, © Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © Cy Twombly Foundation; © 2020 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © Cy Twombly Foundation; © 2020 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork, left and right: © Cy Twombly Foundation, middle: © Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti Paris + ADAGP), Paris 2020. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork, left and right: © Cy Twombly Foundation, middle: © Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti Paris + ADAGP), Paris 2020. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © 2020 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © 2020 Richard Serra/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © 2020 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © 2020 Richard Serra/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © 2020 Richard Serra/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti Paris + ADAGP), Paris 2020; © 2020 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © 2020 Richard Serra/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti Paris + ADAGP), Paris 2020; © 2020 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Rob McKeever

Works Exhibited

Cy Twombly, Duino, 1967 Oil-based house paint and wax crayon on canvas, 70 × 58 inches (177.8 × 147.3 cm)© Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Rob McKeever

Cy Twombly, Duino, 1967

Oil-based house paint and wax crayon on canvas, 70 × 58 inches (177.8 × 147.3 cm)
© Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Rob McKeever

Edmund de Waal, elegie, 2020 Kaolin, graphite, gold, oil stick, oak, and ash, in 2 parts, overall: 33 ⅛ × 46 ⅞ × 1 ¾ inches (84 × 119 × 4.5 cm)© Edmund de Waal. Photo: Mike Bruce

Edmund de Waal, elegie, 2020

Kaolin, graphite, gold, oil stick, oak, and ash, in 2 parts, overall: 33 ⅛ × 46 ⅞ × 1 ¾ inches (84 × 119 × 4.5 cm)
© Edmund de Waal. Photo: Mike Bruce

Medardo Rosso, Bambino Ebreo, c. 1920–25 Wax on plaster, 9 ⅜ × 7 ⅛ × 5 ¾ inches (23.7 × 17.9 × 14.4 cm)Photo: Rabatti & Domingie

Medardo Rosso, Bambino Ebreo, c. 1920–25

Wax on plaster, 9 ⅜ × 7 ⅛ × 5 ¾ inches (23.7 × 17.9 × 14.4 cm)
Photo: Rabatti & Domingie

About

For beauty is nothing but
the beginning of terror, that we are still able to bear,
and we revere it so, because it calmly disdains
to destroy us. 

—Rainer Maria Rilke

Gagosian is pleased to present Duino Elegies, a group exhibition that traces the resonance of Rainer Maria Rilke’s poetry through artworks spanning the past 150 years.

In 1912, Rilke was invited to stay at Duino Castle—a fortress just north of Trieste, Italy—by the Princess Marie von Thurn und Taxis. There, while standing atop a cliff overlooking the Adriatic Sea, he claimed to hear the following line: “Who, if I cried out, would hear me among the angelic orders?” Rilke eventually used these words to open the Duino Elegies, a 1923 collection of ten intensely religious metaphysical poems. Concerned with the interplay of suffering and beauty in human existence, the Elegies also project a hopeful vision of a more peaceful world.

Two decades earlier, Rilke had moved to Paris to write a monograph on Auguste Rodin, initiating a complex but lasting friendship between the two men. Rilke venerated the sculptor’s ability to translate poetic sentiments into figuration, as exemplified by Rodin’s large bronze La Muse tragique (1896). Originally conceived seven years prior for the Monument to Victor Hugo—in which the muse, perched above the French literary giant, whispers inspiration to him—La Muse tragique is presented here as a single figure, evoking a heightened pathos befitting its subject’s symbolic identity.

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Rainer Maria Rilke, 1928. Photo: Lou Andreas-Salomé

Rainer Maria Rilke: Duino Elegies

Bobbie Sheng explores the symbiotic relationship between the poet and visual artists of his time and tracks the enduring influence of his poetry on artists working today.

Anna Weyant’s Two Eileens (2022) on the cover of Gagosian Quarterly, Winter 2022

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Winter 2022

The Winter 2022 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring Anna Weyant’s Two Eileens (2022) on its cover.

Image of Cy Twombly's Treatise on the Veil (Second Version), 1970

Cy Twombly: Imperfect Paradise

Eleonora Di Erasmo, cocurator of Un/veiled: Cy Twombly, Music, Inspirations, a program of concerts, video screenings, and works by Cy Twombly at the Fondazione Nicola Del Roscio, Rome, reflects on the resonances and networks of inspiration between the artist and music. The program was the result of an extensive three-year study, done at the behest of Nicola Del Roscio in the Rome and Gaeta offices of the Cy Twombly Foundation, intended to collect, document, and preserve compositions by musicians around the world who have been inspired by Twombly’s work, or to establish an artistic dialogue with them.

Black and white image of the interior of Cy Twombly’s apartment in Rome

Cy Twombly: Making Past Present

In 2020, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, announced their plan for a survey of Cy Twombly’s artwork alongside selections from their permanent ancient Greek and Roman collection. The survey was postponed due to the lockdowns necessitated by the coronavirus pandemic, but was revived in 2022 with a presentation at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles from August 2 through October 30. In 2023, the exhibition will arrive at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. The curator for the exhibition, Christine Kondoleon, and Kate Nesin, author of Cy Twombly’s Things (2014) and advisor for the show, speak with Gagosian director Mark Francis about the origin of the exhibition and the aesthetic and poetic resonances that give the show its title: Making Past Present.

Darkly lit road, trees, and building exterior at La Ribaute, Barjac, France.

Anselm Kiefer: Architect of Landscape and Cosmology

Jérôme Sans visits La Ribaute in Barjac, France, the vast studio-estate transformed by Anselm Kiefer over the course of decades. The labyrinthine site, now open to the public, stands as a total work of art, reflecting through its grounds, pavilions, and passageways major themes in Kiefer’s oeuvre: regeneration, mythology, memory, and more. 

Two dress sculptures in the landscape at Barjac

La Ribaute: Transitive, It Transforms

Camille Morineau writes of the triumph of the feminine at Anselm Kiefer’s former studio-estate in Barjac, France, describing the site and its installations as a demonstration of women’s power, a meditation on inversion and permeability, and a reversal of the long invisibility of women in history and myth.