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Cy Twombly

Cy Twombly, Min-Oe, 1951 Bitumen and oil-based house paint on canvas, 34 ¼ × 40 inches (87 × 101.6 cm)© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Min-Oe, 1951

Bitumen and oil-based house paint on canvas, 34 ¼ × 40 inches (87 × 101.6 cm)
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 1953 House paint and wax on fabric and wood with twine, wire, and nails, 15 ¼ × 9 ⅞ × 4 inches (38.7 × 25 × 10.2 cm)© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 1953

House paint and wax on fabric and wood with twine, wire, and nails, 15 ¼ × 9 ⅞ × 4 inches (38.7 × 25 × 10.2 cm)
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 1954 Wax crayon, gouache, and colored pencil on paper, 19 × 25 inches (48.2 × 63.5 cm), Museum of Modern Art, New York© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 1954

Wax crayon, gouache, and colored pencil on paper, 19 × 25 inches (48.2 × 63.5 cm), Museum of Modern Art, New York
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Sperlonga Drawing, 1959 Pencil, oil-based house paint, and wax crayon on paper, 27 ½ × 39 ¼ inches (69.9 × 99.7 cm)© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Sperlonga Drawing, 1959

Pencil, oil-based house paint, and wax crayon on paper, 27 ½ × 39 ¼ inches (69.9 × 99.7 cm)
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled (New York City), 1968 Oil-based house paint and wax crayon on canvas, 68 × 85 inches (172.7 × 215.9 cm)© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled (New York City), 1968

Oil-based house paint and wax crayon on canvas, 68 × 85 inches (172.7 × 215.9 cm)
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Veil of Orpheus, 1968 House paint, crayon, and graphite pencil on primed canvas, 90 × 192 inches (228.6 × 487.7 cm)© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Veil of Orpheus, 1968

House paint, crayon, and graphite pencil on primed canvas, 90 × 192 inches (228.6 × 487.7 cm)
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled (Bolsena), 1969 Oil, crayon, and pencil on canvas© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled (Bolsena), 1969

Oil, crayon, and pencil on canvas
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 1969 Oil and crayon on canvas, 79 × 103 ⅜ inches (200.7 × 262.6 cm), Whitney Museum of American Art, New York© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 1969

Oil and crayon on canvas, 79 × 103 ⅜ inches (200.7 × 262.6 cm), Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Mars and the Artist, 1975 Oil, wax crayon, charcoal, and pencil with drawing paper, cardboard, and staples on paper, 55 ⅞ × 50 ¼ inches (142 × 127.5 cm)© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Mars and the Artist, 1975

Oil, wax crayon, charcoal, and pencil with drawing paper, cardboard, and staples on paper, 55 ⅞ × 50 ¼ inches (142 × 127.5 cm)
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Malevich in Pointe-à-Pitre, 1980 Tempera, pencil, and staples on handmade rag paper, 30 ⅛ × 22 ¼ inches (76.4 × 56.4 cm)© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Malevich in Pointe-à-Pitre, 1980

Tempera, pencil, and staples on handmade rag paper, 30 ⅛ × 22 ¼ inches (76.4 × 56.4 cm)
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 1989 Acrylic and pencil on paper, 30 × 22 ¼ inches (76 × 56.5 cm), Cy Twombly Foundation© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 1989

Acrylic and pencil on paper, 30 × 22 ¼ inches (76 × 56.5 cm), Cy Twombly Foundation
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 1990 Acrylic, wax crayon, and pencil on handmade paper, 30 ⅝ × 21 ⅝ inches (77.8 × 54.8 cm), Cy Twombly Foundation© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 1990

Acrylic, wax crayon, and pencil on handmade paper, 30 ⅝ × 21 ⅝ inches (77.8 × 54.8 cm), Cy Twombly Foundation
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 2001 Acrylic, wax crayon, and cut-and-pasted paper on paper, 48 ⅞ × 39 inches (124 × 99 cm)© Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Rob McKeever

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 2001

Acrylic, wax crayon, and cut-and-pasted paper on paper, 48 ⅞ × 39 inches (124 × 99 cm)
© Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Rob McKeever

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 2003 Acrylic on canvas, 84 × 106 inches (213.4 × 269.2 cm)© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 2003

Acrylic on canvas, 84 × 106 inches (213.4 × 269.2 cm)
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Brushes (Lexington), 2005 Color dry-print, 17 × 11 inches (43.2 × 27.9 cm), edition of 6© Nicola Del Roscio Foundation

Cy Twombly, Brushes (Lexington), 2005

Color dry-print, 17 × 11 inches (43.2 × 27.9 cm), edition of 6
© Nicola Del Roscio Foundation

Cy Twombly, Note III, 2005–07 Acrylic on wood panel, 96 × 144 inches (243.8 × 365.8 cm)© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Note III, 2005–07

Acrylic on wood panel, 96 × 144 inches (243.8 × 365.8 cm)
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Bacchus, 2006–08 Acrylic on canvas, 124 ⅞ × 159 ⅛ inches (317 × 404.2 cm), Cy Twombly Foundation© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Bacchus, 2006–08

Acrylic on canvas, 124 ⅞ × 159 ⅛ inches (317 × 404.2 cm), Cy Twombly Foundation
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, The Rose (IV), 2008 Acrylic on wood panel, 99 ¼ × 291 ⅜ inches (252 × 740 cm)© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, The Rose (IV), 2008

Acrylic on wood panel, 99 ¼ × 291 ⅜ inches (252 × 740 cm)
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Light Flowers V (Gaeta), 2008 Color dry-print, 17 × 11 inches (43.2 × 27.9 cm), edition of 6© Nicola Del Roscio Foundation

Cy Twombly, Light Flowers V (Gaeta), 2008

Color dry-print, 17 × 11 inches (43.2 × 27.9 cm), edition of 6
© Nicola Del Roscio Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled (Lexington), 2009 Wood, white paint, cardboard, yellow acrylic, and plastic strings, 21 × 12 × 9 ½ inches (53.3 × 30.5 × 24.1 cm)© Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Rob McKeever

Cy Twombly, Untitled (Lexington), 2009

Wood, white paint, cardboard, yellow acrylic, and plastic strings, 21 × 12 × 9 ½ inches (53.3 × 30.5 × 24.1 cm)
© Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Rob McKeever

Cy Twombly, Camino Real II, 2010 Acrylic on plywood, 99 ⅜ × 72 ⅞ inches (252.4 × 185.1 cm)© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Camino Real II, 2010

Acrylic on plywood, 99 ⅜ × 72 ⅞ inches (252.4 × 185.1 cm)
© Cy Twombly Foundation

About

To my mind, one does not put oneself in place of the past; one only adds a new link.
—Cy Twombly

Cy Twombly (1928–2011) developed a gestural vocabulary in which each line and color is infused with energy, spirituality, and meaning. Emerging as a prominent figure in the mid-1950s following extensive travels throughout Europe and North Africa, he produced works that are simultaneously personal and mythological, allowing narrative, language, and inner visions to erupt from his intimate, abstract notations.

Twombly was born in 1928 in Lexington, Virginia, and studied art in Boston and New York, then at Black Mountain College in North Carolina in the early 1950s. Although he was a contemporary of Robert Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns, his work soon digressed from the aims of American postwar abstraction. While prevailing tendencies of the period, such as Pop art, sought to abandon historical narratives altogether, Twombly directed his focus toward ancient, classical, and modern poetic traditions. In the late 1950s he moved to Italy, where he produced colorful, diagrammatic works, such as Ode to Psyche (1960), that feature erotic allusions and sly jokes while maintaining an abstract charge. Shortly thereafter the sebaceous, bright colors of these works gave way to the more austere grays and blues of the “blackboard” paintings, in which terse, white scrawls and loops recall the powdery effects of chalk on a blackboard. As Twombly continued to work in various locations over the following decades—including Rome, Lexington, and his final residence, in Gaeta, Italy—places, landscapes, and natural forms came to figure prominently in his drawings, collages, photographs, and watercolors.

For Twombly, the poetic and the rational were not mutually exclusive. Collage, which engaged him briefly in 1959, then began to appear more regularly in 1971, allies Twombly to the Dadaists and their descendants, such as Rauschenberg and Johns. Visual information from everyday life—travel postcards, reproductions of paintings, scientific illustrations, personal drawings, and more—entered his work as a way to explore the potential of both structure and meaning.

From his student days on, Twombly also captured his daily life in photographs. He recorded the verdant landscapes of Virginia and the coasts of Italy; close-up details of ancient buildings and sculptures; studio interiors; and still lifes of objects and flowers. Beginning in the early 1990s, he used specialized copiers to enlarge his Polaroid images on matte paper, resulting in subtle distortions that approximate the timeless qualities of his paintings and sculptures.

In 1995 the Cy Twombly Gallery opened across the street from the Menil Collection in Houston. A collaboration between the Menil, Dia Foundation, and Twombly himself, the gallery serves as a permanent home for a number of important works made between 1953 and 2004. Included is the series of paintings Analysis of the Rose as Sentimental Despair (1985), which features floral forms in deep reds, pinks, and purples, with quotations from Rainer Maria Rilke, Rumi, and Giacomo Leopardi. In 2010 Twombly was selected to install a permanent work at the Louvre: a painted ceiling for the Salle des Bronzes. The Ceiling spans 3,750 square feet and pays homage to the greatest Hellenic sculptors, from Phidias to Praxiteles, each of their names inscribed over an immense blue sky populated by floating, cosmic orbs.

Cy Twombly

Photo: Michael Stravato/The New York Times/Redux

Website

cytwombly.org

Cy Twombly, Untitled (Say Goodbye, Catallus, to the Shores of Asia Minor), 1994, oil, acrylic, oil stick, crayon, and graphite on three canvases,

Say Goodbye, Catullus, to the Shores of Asia Minor

Thierry Greub tracks the literary references in Cy Twomblys epic painting of 1994.

Carrie Mae Weems’s The Louvre (2006), on the cover of Gagosian Quarterly, Summer 2021

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Summer 2021

The Summer 2021 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring Carrie Mae Weems’s The Louvre (2006) on its cover.

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 1990, acrylic, wax crayon, and pencil on handmade paper, 30 ⅝ × 21 ⅝ inches (77.8 × 54.8 cm)

Twombly and the Poets

Anne Boyer, the inaugural winner of the Cy Twombly Award in Poetry, composes a poem in response to TwomblyAristaeus Mourning the Loss of His Bees (1973) and introduces a portfolio of the painters works accompanied by the poems that inspired them.

Gerhard Richter’s Helen (1963) on the cover of Gagosian Quarterly, Spring 2021

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Spring 2021

The Spring 2021 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring Gerhard Richter’s Helen (1963) on its cover.

Rainer Maria Rilke, 1928. Photo: Lou Andreas-Salomé

Rainer Maria Rilke: Duino Elegies

Bobbie Sheng explores the symbiotic relationship between the poet and visual artists of his time and tracks the enduring influence of his poetry on artists working today.

Featuring Joan Jonas’s Mirror Piece 1 (1969) on its cover.

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Summer 2020

The Summer 2020 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring Joan Jonas’s Mirror Piece 1 (1969) on its cover.

River Café menu with illustration by Ed Ruscha.

The River Café Cookbook

London’s River Café, a culinary mecca perched on a bend in the River Thames, celebrated its thirtieth anniversary in 2018. To celebrate this milestone and the publication of her cookbook River Café London, cofounder Ruth Rogers sat down with Derek Blasberg to discuss the famed restaurant’s allure.

Left: Sally Mann, Self-Portrait, 1974; right: Jenny Saville in her studio, c. 1990s.

In Conversation
Sally Mann and Jenny Saville

The two artists discuss being drawn to difficult subjects, the effects of motherhood on their practice, embracing chance, and their shared adoration of Cy Twombly.

The cover of the Fall 2019 Gagosian Quarterly magazine. Artwork by Nathaniel Mary Quinn

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Fall 2019

The Fall 2019 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring a detail from Sinking (2019) by Nathaniel Mary Quinn on its cover.

Glenstone Museum.

Intimate Grandeur: Glenstone Museum

Paul Goldberger tracks the evolution of Mitchell and Emily Rales’s Glenstone Museum in Potomac, Maryland. Set amid 230 acres of pristine landscape and housing a world-class collection of modern and contemporary art, this graceful complex of pavilions, designed by architects Thomas Phifer and Partners, opened to the public in the fall of 2018.

Cy Twombly: In Beauty it is finished

Cy Twombly: In Beauty it is finished

Mark Francis, director of the exhibition Cy Twombly: In Beauty it is finished, Drawings 1951–2008, describes the impetus for this expansive presentation, the source for its title, and details the stories of some of the works on view.

Cy Twombly: Coronation of Sesostris

Cy Twombly: Coronation of Sesostris

Cy Twombly’s Coronation of Sesostris (2000) receives a closer look by Gagosian Director, Mark Francis. In this video, he discusses the history of the work, the myths and poetry embedded within it, and considers its lasting impact.

Fairs, Events & Announcements

Gagosian’s booth at Art Basel Miami Beach 2021. Artwork, left to right: © Albert Oehlen; © Judd Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © Mary Weatherford. Photo: Sebastiano Pellion di Persano

Art Fair

Art Basel Miami Beach 2021

December 2–4, 2021, Booth D5
Miami Beach Convention Center
artbasel.com

Gagosian is pleased to announce its participation in Art Basel Miami Beach 2021 with a presentation of modern and contemporary works. A selection of these works will also appear on gagosian.com and on Art Basel’s Online Viewing Room.

To receive a pdf with detailed information on the works, please contact the gallery at inquire@gagosian.com. To attend the fair, purchase tickets at artbasel.com.

Gagosian’s booth at Art Basel Miami Beach 2021. Artwork, left to right: © Albert Oehlen; © Judd Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © Mary Weatherford. Photo: Sebastiano Pellion di Persano

Gagosian’s booth at FIAC 2021. Artwork, left to right: © Giuseppe Penone/2021 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris; © Michael Heizer; © Georg Baselitz, 2021; © Pier Paolo Calzolari. Photo: Thomas Lannes

Art Fair

FIAC 2021

October 21–24, 2021, booth B23
Grand Palais Éphémère, Paris
fiac.com

Gagosian is pleased to participate in FIAC 2021 with a presentation of painting, sculpture, and works on paper by gallery artists. The booth will feature works by Georg Baselitz, Edmund de Waal, Helen Frankenthaler, Theaster Gates, Katharina Grosse, Simon Hantaï, Takashi Murakami, Albert Oehlen, Steven Parrino, Auguste Rodin, Sterling RubySetsukoJim Shawand Cy Twombly, among others. A selection of the works will also appear on gagosian.com and in FIAC’s Online Viewing Room.

To receive a pdf with detailed information on the works, please contact the gallery at inquire@gagosian.com. To attend the fair, purchase tickets at fiac.com.

Gagosian’s booth at FIAC 2021. Artwork, left to right: © Giuseppe Penone/2021 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris; © Michael Heizer; © Georg Baselitz, 2021; © Pier Paolo Calzolari. Photo: Thomas Lannes

Cy Twombly, Roses, Gaeta, 2004 © Fondazione Nicola Del Roscio

Art Fair

Paris Photo 2021
Cy Twombly

November 11–14, 2021
Grand Palais Ephémère, Paris
www.parisphoto.com

Gagosian is pleased to participate in Paris Photo 2021 with a presentation of photographs by Cy Twombly, featuring fruit, flower, and landscape imagery. These shots are permeated with images of organic growth, depicting heirloom lemons cultivated in Gaeta, Italy; the petals of tulips and roses; and verdant landscapes captured near the artist’s Lexington, Virginia, birthplace. The evocation of vision and memory and the joyful embrace of life embodied by these photographs extend to the pictures that Twombly took in 2011 of crosses and flowers in a cemetery on the Caribbean island of Saint Barthélemy—his final series of photographs.

Cy Twombly, Roses, Gaeta, 2004 © Fondazione Nicola Del Roscio

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Museum Exhibitions

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 2002 © Rudolf Stingel. Photo: Alessandro Zambianchi

On View

Hey! Did you know that art does not exist

Through January 7, 2022
Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Israel
www.tamuseum.org.il

This exhibition presents more than one hundred works from Sylvio Perlstein’s intensely personal collection, which traces artists and trends that have defined the avant-garde, complex, and experimental nature of twentieth-century art. Work by Jean-Michel BasquiatDuane HansonRoy LichtensteinMan RayBrice Marden, Ed RuschaRudolf Stingel, Cy Twombly, and Andy Warhol is included.

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 2002 © Rudolf Stingel. Photo: Alessandro Zambianchi

Jay DeFeo, Untitled (Florence), 1952, Museum of Modern Art, New York © 2020 The Jay DeFeo Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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Degree Zero
Drawing at Midcentury

October 31, 2020–June 5, 2021
Museum of Modern Art, New York
www.moma.org

Bringing together approximately eighty works on paper from the museum’s collection, Degree Zero illuminates how artists used drawing to forge a new visual language in the aftermath of World War II. Modest, immediate, and direct, drawing was the ideal medium for this period of renewal. The exhibition looks across movements, geographies, and generations to highlight connections between artists who shared common materials and ideas between 1948 and 1961. Work by Jay DeFeo, Willem de Kooning, Alberto Giacometti, and Cy Twombly is included.

Jay DeFeo, Untitled (Florence), 1952, Museum of Modern Art, New York © 2020 The Jay DeFeo Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Cy Twombly, The Song of the Border Guard, 1952 © Cy Twombly Foundation

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How Far Can Creativity Take You
VMFA Fellowship Artists

October 30, 2018–May 16, 2020
VMFA on the Road: An Artmobile for the 21st Century, various locations throughout Virginia
www.vmfa.museum

The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts’s new state-of-the-art traveling museum and art studio offers an opportunity for residents of the Commonwealth to see and experience works of art from the collection up close. The inaugural exhibition, How Far Can Creativity Take You, celebrates the role this institution has played in the lives of fellowship recipients. Work by Sally Mann and Cy Twombly is included.

Cy Twombly, The Song of the Border Guard, 1952 © Cy Twombly Foundation

Helen Frankenthaler, Western Dream, 1957, collection of Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, New York © 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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Epic Abstraction
Pollock to Herrera

December 17, 2018–February 4, 2020
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
www.metmuseum.org

Epic Abstraction: Pollock to Herrera explores large-scale abstract painting, sculpture, and assemblage, from the 1940s to the twenty-first century, through works from the Met collection and special loans. Many of the artists in the exhibition worked in large formats not only to explore aesthetic elements of line, color, shape, and texture, but also to activate scale’s metaphoric potential to evoke expansive—“epic”—ideas and subjects, including time, history, nature, and existential concerns of the self. Work by Helen Frankenthaler and Cy Twombly is included.

Helen Frankenthaler, Western Dream, 1957, collection of Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, New York © 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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Press

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