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Cy Twombly

Cy Twombly, Min-Oe, 1951 Bitumen and oil-based house paint on canvas, 34 ¼ × 40 inches (87 × 101.6 cm)© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Min-Oe, 1951

Bitumen and oil-based house paint on canvas, 34 ¼ × 40 inches (87 × 101.6 cm)
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 1953 House paint and wax on fabric and wood with twine, wire, and nails, 15 ¼ × 9 ⅞ × 4 inches (38.7 × 25 × 10.2 cm)© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 1953

House paint and wax on fabric and wood with twine, wire, and nails, 15 ¼ × 9 ⅞ × 4 inches (38.7 × 25 × 10.2 cm)
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 1954 Wax crayon, gouache, and colored pencil on paper, 19 × 25 inches (48.2 × 63.5 cm), Museum of Modern Art, New York© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 1954

Wax crayon, gouache, and colored pencil on paper, 19 × 25 inches (48.2 × 63.5 cm), Museum of Modern Art, New York
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Sperlonga Drawing, 1959 Pencil, oil-based house paint, and wax crayon on paper, 27 ½ × 39 ¼ inches (69.9 × 99.7 cm)© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Sperlonga Drawing, 1959

Pencil, oil-based house paint, and wax crayon on paper, 27 ½ × 39 ¼ inches (69.9 × 99.7 cm)
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled (New York City), 1968 Oil-based house paint and wax crayon on canvas, 68 × 85 inches (172.7 × 215.9 cm)© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled (New York City), 1968

Oil-based house paint and wax crayon on canvas, 68 × 85 inches (172.7 × 215.9 cm)
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Veil of Orpheus, 1968 House paint, crayon, and graphite pencil on primed canvas, 90 × 192 inches (228.6 × 487.7 cm)© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Veil of Orpheus, 1968

House paint, crayon, and graphite pencil on primed canvas, 90 × 192 inches (228.6 × 487.7 cm)
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled (Bolsena), 1969 Oil, crayon, and pencil on canvas© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled (Bolsena), 1969

Oil, crayon, and pencil on canvas
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 1969 Oil and crayon on canvas, 79 × 103 ⅜ inches (200.7 × 262.6 cm), Whitney Museum of American Art, New York© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 1969

Oil and crayon on canvas, 79 × 103 ⅜ inches (200.7 × 262.6 cm), Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Mars and the Artist, 1975 Oil, wax crayon, charcoal, and pencil with drawing paper, cardboard, and staples on paper, 55 ⅞ × 50 ¼ inches (142 × 127.5 cm)© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Mars and the Artist, 1975

Oil, wax crayon, charcoal, and pencil with drawing paper, cardboard, and staples on paper, 55 ⅞ × 50 ¼ inches (142 × 127.5 cm)
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Malevich in Pointe-à-Pitre, 1980 Tempera, pencil, and staples on handmade rag paper, 30 ⅛ × 22 ¼ inches (76.4 × 56.4 cm)© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Malevich in Pointe-à-Pitre, 1980

Tempera, pencil, and staples on handmade rag paper, 30 ⅛ × 22 ¼ inches (76.4 × 56.4 cm)
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 1989 Acrylic and pencil on paper, 30 × 22 ¼ inches (76 × 56.5 cm), Cy Twombly Foundation© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 1989

Acrylic and pencil on paper, 30 × 22 ¼ inches (76 × 56.5 cm), Cy Twombly Foundation
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 1990 Acrylic, wax crayon, and pencil on handmade paper, 30 ⅝ × 21 ⅝ inches (77.8 × 54.8 cm), Cy Twombly Foundation© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 1990

Acrylic, wax crayon, and pencil on handmade paper, 30 ⅝ × 21 ⅝ inches (77.8 × 54.8 cm), Cy Twombly Foundation
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 2001 Acrylic, wax crayon, and cut-and-pasted paper on paper, 48 ⅞ × 39 inches (124 × 99 cm)© Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Rob McKeever

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 2001

Acrylic, wax crayon, and cut-and-pasted paper on paper, 48 ⅞ × 39 inches (124 × 99 cm)
© Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Rob McKeever

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 2003 Acrylic on canvas, 84 × 106 inches (213.4 × 269.2 cm)© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 2003

Acrylic on canvas, 84 × 106 inches (213.4 × 269.2 cm)
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Brushes (Lexington), 2005 Color dry-print, 17 × 11 inches (43.2 × 27.9 cm), edition of 6© Nicola Del Roscio Foundation

Cy Twombly, Brushes (Lexington), 2005

Color dry-print, 17 × 11 inches (43.2 × 27.9 cm), edition of 6
© Nicola Del Roscio Foundation

Cy Twombly, Note III, 2005–07 Acrylic on wood panel, 96 × 144 inches (243.8 × 365.8 cm)© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Note III, 2005–07

Acrylic on wood panel, 96 × 144 inches (243.8 × 365.8 cm)
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Bacchus, 2006–08 Acrylic on canvas, 124 ⅞ × 159 ⅛ inches (317 × 404.2 cm), Cy Twombly Foundation© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Bacchus, 2006–08

Acrylic on canvas, 124 ⅞ × 159 ⅛ inches (317 × 404.2 cm), Cy Twombly Foundation
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, The Rose (IV), 2008 Acrylic on wood panel, 99 ¼ × 291 ⅜ inches (252 × 740 cm)© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, The Rose (IV), 2008

Acrylic on wood panel, 99 ¼ × 291 ⅜ inches (252 × 740 cm)
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Light Flowers V (Gaeta), 2008 Color dry-print, 17 × 11 inches (43.2 × 27.9 cm), edition of 6© Nicola Del Roscio Foundation

Cy Twombly, Light Flowers V (Gaeta), 2008

Color dry-print, 17 × 11 inches (43.2 × 27.9 cm), edition of 6
© Nicola Del Roscio Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled (Lexington), 2009 Wood, white paint, cardboard, yellow acrylic, and plastic strings, 21 × 12 × 9 ½ inches (53.3 × 30.5 × 24.1 cm)© Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Rob McKeever

Cy Twombly, Untitled (Lexington), 2009

Wood, white paint, cardboard, yellow acrylic, and plastic strings, 21 × 12 × 9 ½ inches (53.3 × 30.5 × 24.1 cm)
© Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Rob McKeever

Cy Twombly, Camino Real II, 2010 Acrylic on plywood, 99 ⅜ × 72 ⅞ inches (252.4 × 185.1 cm)© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Camino Real II, 2010

Acrylic on plywood, 99 ⅜ × 72 ⅞ inches (252.4 × 185.1 cm)
© Cy Twombly Foundation

About

To my mind, one does not put oneself in place of the past; one only adds a new link.
—Cy Twombly

Cy Twombly (1928–2011) developed a gestural vocabulary in which each line and color is infused with energy, spirituality, and meaning. Emerging as a prominent figure in the mid-1950s following extensive travels throughout Europe and North Africa, he produced works that are simultaneously personal and mythological, allowing narrative, language, and inner visions to erupt from his intimate, abstract notations.

Twombly was born in 1928 in Lexington, Virginia, and studied art in Boston and New York, then at Black Mountain College in North Carolina in the early 1950s. Although he was a contemporary of Robert Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns, his work soon digressed from the aims of American postwar abstraction. While prevailing tendencies of the period, such as Pop art, sought to abandon historical narratives altogether, Twombly directed his focus toward ancient, classical, and modern poetic traditions. In the late 1950s he moved to Italy, where he produced colorful, diagrammatic works, such as Ode to Psyche (1960), that feature erotic allusions and sly jokes while maintaining an abstract charge. Shortly thereafter the sebaceous, bright colors of these works gave way to the more austere grays and blues of the “blackboard” paintings, in which terse, white scrawls and loops recall the powdery effects of chalk on a blackboard. As Twombly continued to work in various locations over the following decades—including Rome, Lexington, and his final residence, in Gaeta, Italy—places, landscapes, and natural forms came to figure prominently in his drawings, collages, photographs, and watercolors.

For Twombly, the poetic and the rational were not mutually exclusive. Collage, which engaged him briefly in 1959, then began to appear more regularly in 1971, allies Twombly to the Dadaists and their descendants, such as Rauschenberg and Johns. Visual information from everyday life—travel postcards, reproductions of paintings, scientific illustrations, personal drawings, and more—entered his work as a way to explore the potential of both structure and meaning.

From his student days on, Twombly also captured his daily life in photographs. He recorded the verdant landscapes of Virginia and the coasts of Italy; close-up details of ancient buildings and sculptures; studio interiors; and still lifes of objects and flowers. Beginning in the early 1990s, he used specialized copiers to enlarge his Polaroid images on matte paper, resulting in subtle distortions that approximate the timeless qualities of his paintings and sculptures.

In 1995 the Cy Twombly Gallery opened across the street from the Menil Collection in Houston. A collaboration between the Menil, Dia Foundation, and Twombly himself, the gallery serves as a permanent home for a number of important works made between 1953 and 2004. Included is the series of paintings Analysis of the Rose as Sentimental Despair (1985), which features floral forms in deep reds, pinks, and purples, with quotations from Rainer Maria Rilke, Rumi, and Giacomo Leopardi. In 2010 Twombly was selected to install a permanent work at the Louvre: a painted ceiling for the Salle des Bronzes. The Ceiling spans 3,750 square feet and pays homage to the greatest Hellenic sculptors, from Phidias to Praxiteles, each of their names inscribed over an immense blue sky populated by floating, cosmic orbs.

Cy Twombly

Photo: Michael Stravato/The New York Times/Redux

Website

cytwombly.org

Left: Sally Mann, Self-Portrait, 1974; right: Jenny Saville in her studio, c. 1990s.

Sally Mann and Jenny Saville

The two artists discuss being drawn to difficult subjects, the effects of motherhood on their practice, embracing chance, and their shared adoration of Cy Twombly.

The cover of the Fall 2019 Gagosian Quarterly magazine. Artwork by Nathaniel Mary Quinn

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Fall 2019

The Fall 2019 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring a detail from Sinking (2019) by Nathaniel Mary Quinn on its cover.

Glenstone Museum.

Intimate Grandeur: Glenstone Museum

Paul Goldberger tracks the evolution of Mitchell and Emily Rales’s Glenstone Museum in Potomac, Maryland. Set amid 230 acres of pristine landscape and housing a world-class collection of modern and contemporary art, this graceful complex of pavilions, designed by architects Thomas Phifer and Partners, opened to the public in the fall of 2018.

Cy Twombly: In Beauty it is finished

Cy Twombly: In Beauty it is finished

Mark Francis, director of the exhibition Cy Twombly: In Beauty it is finished, Drawings 1951–2008, describes the impetus for this expansive presentation, the source for its title, and details the stories of some of the works on view.

Cy Twombly: Coronation of Sesostris

Cy Twombly: Coronation of Sesostris

Cy Twombly’s Coronation of Sesostris (2000) receives a closer look by Gagosian Director, Mark Francis. In this video, he discusses the history of the work, the myths and poetry embedded within it, and considers its lasting impact.

C.T.S.T.

C.T.S.T.

Katharina Grosse reflects on the work of Cy Twombly.

Cy Twombly

Cy Twombly

Olivier Berggruen and Mary Jacobus spoke about the works in the inaugural exhibition at Gagosian’s Grosvenor Hill outpost.

Treatise on the Veil: Cy Twombly at the Morgan

Treatise on the Veil: Cy Twombly at the Morgan

On the occasion of the Morgan Library and Museum’s exhibition of Cy Twombly’s monumental painting Treatise on the Veil (1970) and related drawings, Gagosian director Mark Francis speaks with Isabelle Dervaux, Acquavella Curator of Modern & Contemporary Drawings at the Morgan.

Fairs, Events & Announcements

Tom Wesselmann, Sunset Nude with Wesselmann Still Life, 2004 © The Estate of Tom Wesselmann/Licensed by ARS/VAGA, New York

Art Fair

Art Basel Miami Beach 2019

December 5–8, 2019, booth D7
Miami Beach Convention Center
www.artbasel.com

Gagosian is pleased to participate in Art Basel Miami Beach 2019 with modern and contemporary artworks by Richard Avedon, Georg Baselitz, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Joe Bradley, Cecily Brown, John Chamberlain, John Currin, Edmund de Waal, Rachel Feinstein, Urs Fischer, Helen Frankenthaler, Ellen Gallagher, Theaster Gates, Katharina Grosse, Mark Grotjahn, Jennifer Guidi, Simon Hantaï, Damien Hirst, Alex Israel and Bret Easton Ellis, Ellsworth Kelly, Jeff Koons, Roy Lichtenstein, Man Ray, Peter MarinoAdam McEwenJoan MitchellTakashi MurakamiAlbert OehlenSteven ParrinoPablo Picasso, Rudolf Polanszky, Richard PrinceSterling RubyEd RuschaRichard SerraRudolf StingelCy TwomblyAndy WarholMary WeatherfordTom WesselmannJonas WoodChristopher Wool, and Zao Wou-Ki, among others.

To receive a PDF with detailed information on the works, please contact the gallery at inquire@gagosian.com. To attend the fair, purchase tickets at www.artbasel.com.

Download the full press release (PDF)

Tom Wesselmann, Sunset Nude with Wesselmann Still Life, 2004 © The Estate of Tom Wesselmann/Licensed by ARS/VAGA, New York

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 2004 © Cy Twombly Foundation

Tour

Cy Twombly
Sculpture

Wednesday, December 4, 2019, 6:15pm
Gagosian, Grosvenor Hill, London

Join Gagosian for a tour of Cy Twombly: Sculpture, currently on view at Grosvenor Hill, London. The exhibition, presented in association with the Cy Twombly Foundation, marks the publication of the second volume of the catalogue raisonné of Twombly’s sculptures edited by Nicola Del Roscio and published by Schirmer/Mosel. Gagosian’s Alice Godwin will lead the tour, providing an overview of the materials, processes, and influences behind the artist’s sculptural works. To attend the free event, RSVP to londontours@gagosian.com. Space is limited.

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 2004 © Cy Twombly Foundation

Gagosian at Galeries Lafayette Champs-Élysées, Paris, 2019

Visit

Gagosian at Galeries Lafayette Champs-Élysées

Opening reception: Saturday, October 12, 6:30–8pm
October 12–20, 2019
Galeries Lafayette Champs-Élysées, Paris
galerieslafayettechampselysees.com

In celebration of FIAC in Paris, Gagosian is pleased to collaborate with Galeries Lafayette Champs-Élysées on a two-floor pop-up takeover featuring products related to Gagosian artists. On the first floor, the Coin Culture section will feature catalogues, posters, apparel, and audio productions. The second floor, the Library, will house an additional selection of limited-edition books, publications, and catalogues raisonnés.

Download the full press release in English (PDF) or French (PDF)

Gagosian at Galeries Lafayette Champs-Élysées, Paris, 2019

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Museum Exhibitions

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 1959 © Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Peter Schälchli, Zurich

On View

Cy Twombly
Portraits

Through January 19, 2020
National Portrait Gallery, London
www.npg.org.uk

Exploring figuration and portraiture in Cy Twombly’s practice, across the media of painting, drawing, and photography, this exhibition centers on two paintings of the artist’s friends: the set designer Henry Heymann, whom Twombly painted in 1956, and the philanthropist J. Paul Getty Jr., represented in an abstract work from 1967. The exhibition also includes Twombly’s photographs of friends, family, and himself, alongside never-before-seen drawings that reveal the importance of classical art and figuration within his oeuvre.

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 1959 © Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Peter Schälchli, Zurich

Cy Twombly, The Song of the Border Guard, 1952 © Cy Twombly Foundation

On View

How Far Can Creativity Take You
VMFA Fellowship Artists

Through May 16, 2020
VMFA on the Road: An Artmobile for the 21st Century, various locations throughout Virginia
www.vmfa.museum

The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts’s new state-of-the-art traveling museum and art studio offers an opportunity for residents of the Commonwealth to see and experience works of art from the collection up close. The inaugural exhibition, How Far Can Creativity Take You, celebrates the role this institution has played in the lives of fellowship recipients. Work by Sally Mann and Cy Twombly is included.

Cy Twombly, The Song of the Border Guard, 1952 © Cy Twombly Foundation

Helen Frankenthaler, Western Dream, 1957, collection of Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, New York © 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

On View

Epic Abstraction
Pollock to Herrera

Opened December 17, 2018
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
www.metmuseum.org

Epic Abstraction: Pollock to Herrera explores large-scale abstract painting, sculpture, and assemblage, from the 1940s to the twenty-first century, through works from the Met collection and special loans. Many of the artists in the exhibition worked in large formats not only to explore aesthetic elements of line, color, shape, and texture, but also to activate scale’s metaphoric potential to evoke expansive—“epic”—ideas and subjects, including time, history, nature, and existential concerns of the self. Work by Helen Frankenthaler and Cy Twombly is included.

Helen Frankenthaler, Western Dream, 1957, collection of Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, New York © 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 2002 © Nicola Del Roscio Foundation

Closed

Cy Twombly
Photographs

August 26–November 4, 2018
Château La Coste, Le Puy-Sainte-Réparade, France
chateau-la-coste.com

Cy Twombly: Photographs is comprised of thirty photographs, taken between 1985 and 2008, variously depicting intimate spaces, landscapes, and natural subjects. This exhibition has traveled from the Sursock Museum in Beirut.

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 2002 © Nicola Del Roscio Foundation

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Press

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