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Permanent Installation

Anselm Kiefer
Panthéon

Anselm Kiefer has produced a new series of works for the Panthéon in Paris, including a permanent installation comprising six vitrines, as well as two monumental paintings that are currently on loan. Together with a composition by the French contemporary composer Pascal Dusapin, it forms an ensemble of new works commissioned by President Emmanuel Macron. This marks the first time since 1924 that such a commission has been produced for the Panthéon; the works’ unveiling coincided with Armistice Day, November 11, 2020.

Anselm Kiefer, Qu’est-ce que nous sommes. . . , 2020, installation view, Panthéon, Paris © Anselm Kiefer. Photo: Georges Poncet

Anselm Kiefer, Qu’est-ce que nous sommes. . . , 2020, installation view, Panthéon, Paris © Anselm Kiefer. Photo: Georges Poncet

Related News

Anselm Kiefer: Transition from Cool to Warm (New York: Gagosian, 2017)

Online Reading

Anselm Kiefer
Transition from Cool to Warm

Anselm Kiefer: Transition from Cool to Warm is available for online reading from May 31 through July 1 as part of the From the Library series. The catalogue documents the artist’s exhibition at Gagosian New York in 2017. Central to this publication are more than forty watercolors made between 2012 and 2016, marking Kiefer’s return to the medium after forty years. The exhibition also featured over forty unique artist books and nine monumental landscape paintings, which are included in the catalogue. Essays by novelist Karl Ove Knausgård and art historian James Lawrence are included, along with an interview by art journalist Louisa Buck and the artist.

Anselm Kiefer: Transition from Cool to Warm (New York: Gagosian, 2017)

Anselm Kiefer, Uraeus, 2017–18 (detail) © Anselm Kiefer. Photo: Georges Poncet

Public Installation

Anselm Kiefer
Uraeus

May 2–July 22, 2018
Rockefeller Center, New York
www.publicartfund.org

Uraeus is Anselm Kiefer’s first US site-specific public sculpture. Commissioned by Public Art Fund and Tishman Speyer, and presented by Gagosian, the work consists of a gigantic open book with eagle’s wings 30 feet in span, both made of lead, on top of a 20-foot-tall lead-clad stainless steel column. Clustered around the base are further outsize lead books, while a large snake coils up the column. Lead is one of the artist’s preferred materials owing to its soft, fluid properties traditionally associated with alchemical transformation, especially its second stage: dissolution.

Anselm Kiefer, Uraeus, 2017–18 (detail) © Anselm Kiefer. Photo: Georges Poncet

Anselm Kiefer, Uraeus, 2017–18 (detail) © Anselm Kiefer

Artist Talk

Anselm Kiefer

Monday, April 30, 2018, 6:30–8pm
New School, New York
www.publicartfund.org

Anselm Kiefer will speak with Richard Calvocoressi about his new work and past public art projects on the occasion of his new public installation Uraeus at Rockefeller Center, New York, on view May 2–July 22, 2018. To attend the event, purchase tickets at newschool.edu

Anselm Kiefer, Uraeus, 2017–18 (detail) © Anselm Kiefer

Walter De Maria, The Lightning Field, 1977, long-term installation, western New Mexico. Artwork © Estate of Walter De Maria. Photo: John Cliett, courtesy Dia Art Foundation, New York, and © Estate of Walter De Maria

Light and Lightning: Wonder-Reactions at Walter De Maria's The Lightning Field

In this second installment of a two-part essay, John Elderfield resumes his investigation of Walter De Maria’s Lightning Field (1977), focusing this time on how the hope to see lightning there has led to the work’s association with the Romantic conception of the sublime.

Carrie Mae Weems’s The Louvre (2006), on the cover of Gagosian Quarterly, Summer 2021

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Summer 2021

The Summer 2021 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring Carrie Mae Weems’s The Louvre (2006) on its cover.

Taryn Simon, “Folder: Broken Objects” (detail), from the series The Picture Collection, 2012, framed archival inkjet print, 47 × 62 inches (119.4 × 157.5 cm) © Taryn Simon

The New York Public Library’s Picture Collection

Joshua Chuang, the Robert B. Menschel Senior Curator of Photography at the New York Public Library, discusses the institution’s singular Picture Collection, the artist Taryn Simon’s rigorous engagement with it, and four instances of its little-known role in the history of art making.

Installation view, Nancy Rubins: Fluid Space, Gagosian, Beverly Hills, June 24–August 6, 2021.

Conclusions Never Reached: Nancy Rubins in Fluid Space

Sara Softness reflects on a new series of sculptures by Nancy Rubins, Fluid Space (2019–21), “visual poems” that hint at the invisible and the unknown.

Tatiana Trouvé, April 4th, The New York Times; April 11th, South China Morning Post, China from the series From March to May, 2020, inkjet print and pencil on paper, 19 ⅞ × 26 ¾ inches (50.4 × 68 cm)

Tatiana Trouvé: From March to May

A portfolio of the artist’s drawings made during lockdown. Text by Jesi Khadivi.

Theaster Gates, A Song for Frankie, 2017–21, 5,000 records, DJ booth, and record player

Social Works: The Archives of Frankie Knuckles Organized by Theaster Gates

Theaster Gates, steward of the Frankie Knuckles record collection, is engaging with the late DJ and musician’s archive of records, ephemera, and personal effects. For the Quarterly’s “Social Works” supplement, guest edited by Antwaun Sargent, Gates presents a selection of Knuckles’s personal record collection. Chantala Kommanivanh, a Chicago-based artist, educator, and musician—and the records manager for Rebuild Foundation, Chicago—provides annotations, contextualizing these records’ importance and unique qualities. Ron Trent, a dear friend of Knuckles’s, speaks to the legacy evinced by these materials.

Taryn Simon, details from An American Index of the Hidden and Unfamiliar, 2007; A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters I–XVIII, 2008–11; A Cold Hole, 2018; An Occupation of Loss, 2016; and Paperwork and the Will of Capital, 2015

In Conversation
Taryn Simon and Teju Cole

This spring, as part of the Lambert Family Lecture Series at the Wexner Center for the Arts, Taryn Simon joined Teju Cole for an online conversation about her artistic practice and creative process.

Carrie Mae Weems, Lewitt’s Wall, 2006

Social Works: Carrie Mae Weems and Maya Phillips

A pairing of photography and poetry from “Social Works,” a supplement guest edited by Antwaun Sargent for the Summer 2021 issue of the Quarterly.

Cover page with title and author against soft red, white, and blue colors

Mercury Was There

A short story by Libby Flores, published here on the occasion of the Quarterly’s collaboration with pen America.

Rick Lowe, Black Wall Street Journey #5, 2021, Acrylic and paper collage on canvas, 108 × 192 inches (274.3 × 487.7 cm)© Rick Lowe Studio. Photo: Thomas Dubrock

Notes on Social Works

Antwaun Sargent presents a collection of thoughts and images, gathered from conversations with artists, curators, architects, and educators, as well as essays, social media, and the news, that inform the exhibition Social Works. The essay serves as an introduction to the corresponding supplement guest edited by Sargent for the Summer 2021 issue of the Quarterly.

Dennis Hopper, 1969. Photo: Columbia Pictures/Album/Alamy Stock Photo.

Dennis Hopper’s Taos Ride

Douglas Dreishpoon reflects on speaking with Hopper at the Harwood Museum of Art, Taos, New Mexico, in 2009.

Gregory Corso, New York, 1986. Photo: Allen Ginsberg

Gregory Corso: A Most Dangerous Art

On the occasion of the forthcoming publication of The Golden Dot: Last Poems by Gregory Corso, Raymond Foye reflects on the poet’s enduring engagement with the human condition and explores the unique structure of this final collection.