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Gagosian Quarterly

April 16, 2020

Shortlist

Twelve Tracks:Jennifer Guidi

In this series we invite artists and writers to tell us about works of art, literature, film, or music that have influenced their work or are at the forefront of their minds today. Here Jennifer Guidi shares a selection of the music she listens to in the studio and speaks about its connection to her meditative painting process.

Jennifer Guidi, We Shine Outward Into the Universe (Gemini and Cancer), 2019, sand, acrylic, and oil on linen, 92 × 74 inches (233.7 × 188 cm)

Jennifer Guidi, We Shine Outward Into the Universe (Gemini and Cancer), 2019, sand, acrylic, and oil on linen, 92 × 74 inches (233.7 × 188 cm)

Jennifer Guidi

Jennifer Guidi creates paintings notable for their luminosity, texture, and sculptural presence. Her swirling, mandala-like compositions oscillate in color and texture, inspiring shifts in perceptual awareness to forge new sensory horizons. Each painting is methodically executed through a unique process—at once systematic and organic—which reflects the connection of her painting practice to strains of Minimalism that privilege attention to detail and repetition. Her sculptural markings evoke an intensely meditative sense of narrative and spiritual votive.

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A recurring form in my painting is the mandala: I start at a center point and move outwards, creating a pattern that radiates out to the edges of the canvas. I apply paint to my brush before making each mark. The repetition of applying paint to the brush and then to the canvas is, for me, a meditative process.

Set to music, this physical practice becomes like choreography. I work to the beat of the music. The rhythm keeps me going and helps me maintain momentum. I need the backdrop of music to push me along and keep me motivated while I paint.

Jennifer Guidi working in her studio to Drake’s “In My Feelings” from his album Scorpion (2018), Los Angeles, 2020

I grew up listening to hip-hop here and there but really connected to it on a deeper level six years ago. Typically I pick an artist and listen to an album all the way through. I play certain songs to get into a desired headspace to paint. Sometimes I connect with the lyrics, the narrative of a song; other times it’s the beat that resonates.

The music doesn’t directly influence the mood or form of the artwork—I plan the color and mark-making before I start painting. But the energy of the song fuels and sustains my own energy.

The list below is composed of a mixture of new tracks I’m listening to now and a few long-time favorites. My intention was for it to be somewhat upbeat, resonating hope and healing for the current moment.

I don’t usually create playlists for the music I listen to in the studio. More often, I’ll pick a particular song and see where it takes me. This selection reflects that; it’s a wandering journey.

As told to Gillian Jakab, April 2020; artwork © Jennifer Guidi

Jennifer Guidi in her Los Angeles studio, 2020.

Jennifer Guidi

The artist speaks with Laura Fried about her most recent paintings, the symbol of the serpent, and her evolving relationship to color.

The cover of the Spring 2020 edition of the Gagosian Quarterly magazine. A Cindy Sherman photograph of herself dressed as a clown against a rainbow background.

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Spring 2020

The Spring 2020 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring Cindy Sherman’s Untitled #412 (2003) on its cover.

(RED) Auction 2018

(RED) Auction 2018

Theaster Gates and Sir David Adjaye join Bono to spearhead (RED)’s third auction of contemporary art and design, raising funds for the global fight against AIDS. As Gagosian prepares the preview exhibition, Gillian Pistell looks at the urgency of this vital cause.

Spencer Sweeney, Self-Portrait Morning Gown, Records, 2019, oil on canvas, 66 x 42 inches (167.6 x 106.7 cm)

Shortlist
Mixtape: Spencer Sweeney

Spencer Sweeney shares a selection of songs that have punctuated his journey through the pandemic and ponders the expressive powers of a playlist.

Still from Vertigo (1958), directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Photo: PARAMOUNT PICTURES/Ronald Grant Archive/Alamy Stock Photo

Shortlist
Five Films: Louise Bonnet

Los Angeles painter Louise Bonnet reminisces about the films that influenced her development as an artist.

Jenny Saville, Study for Pentimenti I, 2011, graphite and pastel on paper.

Shortlist
Five Preoccupations: Jenny Saville

Jenny Saville shares a selection of the books, films, and more that have been her companions in the quiet of the shutdowns in recent months and as she looks ahead to a new exhibition next year.

Five Books: Urs Fischer

Shortlist
Five Books: Urs Fischer

Urs Fischer talks about reading during the pandemic lockdown, sharing five books—both fiction and nonfiction—that he has turned to while in self-isolation.

Twelve Tracks: Roe Ethridge

Shortlist
Twelve Tracks: Roe Ethridge

Roe Ethridge shares the transportive powers of his playlist “Teenage Chemicals in 1985,” a soundtrack that began playing in those formative years and hasn’t stopped since.

Still from La Jetée (1962), directed by Chris Marker.

Shortlist
Five Films: Sarah Sze

Sarah Sze writes about five films that live as richly evocative images in her visual memory.

Installation view of Urs Fischer’s Untitled (2011) in the exhibition Ouverture, Bourse de Commerce – Pinault Collection, Paris, 2021. Artwork © Urs Fischer, courtesy Galerie Eva Presenhuber, Zurich; Bourse de Commerce – Pinault Collection © Tadao Ando Architect & Associates, Niney et Marca Architectes, Agence Pierre-Antoine Gatier. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Bourse de Commerce

William Middleton traces the development of the new institution, examining the collaboration between the collector François Pinault and the architect Tadao Ando in revitalizing the historic space. Middleton also speaks with artists Tatiana Trouvé and Albert Oehlen about Pinault’s passion as a collector, and with the Bouroullec brothers, who created design features for the interiors and exteriors of the museum.

Anna Halprin in The Prophetess, 1955.

Game Changer
Anna Halprin

Jacquelynn Baas celebrates the choreographer, dancer, and teacher, tracing the profound influence she had on the worlds of dance and art.

Kevin Jerome Everson, 2019. Photo: © Erin Leland

Overtime: On Kevin Jerome Everson

Carlos Valladares writes on the filmmaker’s expansive body of work, exploring themes of identity, time, and reality.