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Gagosian Quarterly

April 24, 2020

Shortlist

TWELVE TRACKS:Roe Ethridge

In this series we invite artists and writers to tell us about works of art, literature, film, or music that have influenced their work or are at the forefront of their minds today. Roe Ethridge shares the transportive powers of his playlist “Teenage Chemicals in 1985,” a soundtrack that began playing in those formative years and hasn’t stopped since.

Roe Ethridge, Backing Out, 1996, 2020

Roe Ethridge, Backing Out, 1996, 2020

Roe Ethridge

In his photographs, Roe Ethridge uses the real to suggest—or disrupt—the ideal. Through commercial images of fashion models, products, and advertisements, as well as intimate moments from his own daily life, he subverts the residual authority of established artistic genres such as the still life or the portrait, merging them with the increasingly pervasive image culture of the present. Photo: Albrecht Fuchs

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For as long as I can remember, music has done things to my brain and body. But I think the combo of teenage chemicals and a driver’s license at sixteen years old multiplied the feeling. The music I was listening to was suddenly selected, curated—I’d get a mixtape from a friend or tune in to the college station, hear a song, and go buy the album. I’d make my own mixtapes.

Music became the soundtrack to my world, not just whatever was on the radio. And the car was a place where I wasn’t surveilled by my parents. Driving was autonomy and freedom.

Twelve Tracks: Roe Ethridge

Twelve Tracks: Roe Ethridge

Roe Ethridge, Tallahassee, Florida, c. 1989

All the tracks on the list below are ones I’ve listened to throughout the years. Still I’ll see snapshots of specific moments when I listen to them. I remember “South of Heaven” playing in a “borrowed” Mercedes Benz as we drove around North Florida in the middle of the night, trying to find a scary-ass abandoned house. “Love Vigilantes” always makes me flash on an image of pulling out of my neighborhood with that sense of optimism and melancholy that the song conveys.

At other times they’ll conjure more of a composite image. “Big Black Car”—or any song by Big Star—makes me think of Memphis, a kind of mix of William Eggleston’s photos of the city and the trips I’ve taken there. Sometimes a song will transport me to a specific feeling rather than an image. My Bloody Valentine makes me feel like I’m on something and my eyes are rolling back in my head.

I usually listen to whole albums rather than single tracks. I suggest that all the albums on the list should be listened to as well.

Artwork © Roe Ethridge

Roe Ethridge, Oslo Grace at Willets Point, 2019, dye sublimation print on aluminum.

In Conversation
Roe Ethridge and Antwaun Sargent

From his early work for magazines in the 1990s to recent projects with the designer Telfar Clemens, Roe Ethridge has consistently challenged the distinctions between commercial and conceptual photography that long defined the medium. Antwaun Sargent recently caught up with him to discuss the moment that confirmed the artist’s understanding of the photographic image’s potential for boundary-hopping ubiquity in the contemporary era.

Photograph of pink satin bow by Roe Ethridge

Roe Ethridge

During a conversation with David Rimanelli, Roe Ethridge reflected on photographs that he made during the late 1990s and early 2000s after moving to New York. They spoke as Ethridge was preparing for his exhibition Old Fruit.

The cover of the Spring 2020 edition of the Gagosian Quarterly magazine. A Cindy Sherman photograph of herself dressed as a clown against a rainbow background.

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Spring 2020

The Spring 2020 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring Cindy Sherman’s Untitled #412 (2003) on its cover.

Diana Widmaier-Picasso standing in front of a bookcase

Picasso and Maya: An Interview with Diana Widmaier-Picasso

Diana Widmaier-Picasso curated a presentation at Gagosian, Paris, to celebrate the publication of Picasso and Maya: Father and Daughter at the end of 2019. This comprehensive reference publication explores the figure of Maya Ruiz-Picasso, Pablo Picasso’s beloved eldest daughter, throughout Picasso’s work and chronicles the loving relationship between the artist and his daughter. In this video, Widmaier-Picasso details her ongoing interest in the subject and reflects on the process of making the book.

Self-Reflections: Roe Ethridge Innocence II

Self-Reflections: Roe Ethridge Innocence II

Angela Brown considers the wide-ranging photographs included in Roe Ethridge: Innocence II.  

Innocence II

Innocence II

A photography portfolio by Roe Ethridge, accompanied by Saul Anton’s The Story of L.

Andreas Gursky and Jeff Wall

In Conversation
Andreas Gursky and Jeff Wall

On the occasion of a major survey of Andreas Gursky’s work at the Hayward Gallery in London, Gursky and Jeff Wall discuss the state of photography and the evolution of the medium.

Jennifer Guidi, We Shine Outward Into the Universe (Gemini and Cancer), 2019.

Shortlist
Twelve Tracks: Jennifer Guidi

Jennifer Guidi shares a selection of the music she listens to in the studio and speaks about its connection to her meditative painting process.

Still from La Jetée (1962), directed by Chris Marker.

Shortlist
Five Films: Sarah Sze

Sarah Sze writes about five films that live as richly evocative images in her visual memory.

The Nature of Mark Grotjahn

The Nature of Mark Grotjahn

Michael Auping writes about the origins of Mark Grotjahn’s Capri paintings and their relationship with nature and landscape.

Georg Baselitz and Zeng Fanzhi. Portraits of both artists in black-and-white.

Artist to Artist: Georg Baselitz and Zeng Fanzhi

On the occasion of Georg Baselitz: Years later at Gagosian, Hong Kong, Zeng Fanzhi composed a written foreword for the exhibition’s catalogue and a video message to the German painter. Baselitz wrote a letter of thanks to the Chinese artist for his insightful thoughts.

Willem de Kooning seated at Sidney Janis Gallery, 1959. Color photograph

There is Woman in the Landscapes: Willem de Kooning from 1959 to 1963

Lauren Mahony considers a critical four-year period in the painter’s career, examining the technical changes that occurred between his “abstract parkway landscapes” of the late 1950s and the “pastoral landscapes” that succeeded them, as well as the impact on his work of his impending move to Springs, New York.