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Gagosian Quarterly

May 26, 2021

Building a Legacy

Famously Unknown:Legacy Building in the Art World

In this video, Raymond Foye and Rani Singh discuss the general principles and methodologies of archiving, editing, and presenting the work of overlooked artists and writers. They share firsthand accounts and learning experiences from working with artists and poets such as Jordan Belson, Gregory Corso, Rene Ricard, and Harry Smith.

This talk, held on Tuesday, May 18, 2021, at 1pm eDt, is part of an ongoing program of conversations and presentations with leading artists and cultural figures.

Contents page: Rene Ricard, So Who Left Who, 2007 © Estate of Rene Ricard

Left: Jordan Belson, Berkeley, California, c. 1946. Photo: courtesy Estate of Jordan Belson. Right: Harry Smith (front) and Lionel Ziprin, New York City, c. 1952. Photo: Joanne Ziprin, courtesy Lionel Ziprin Archives

Delineators: Jordan Belson and Harry Smith

Raymond Foye tracks the relationship between the two mavericks, investigating their influence on one another and their enduring legacies.

Ed Sanders, Woodstock, New York, May 29, 1981.

Ed Sanders

Raymond Foye speaks with the author, musician, and American-counterculture record-keeper Ed Sanders at his home in Woodstock, New York.

Allen Midgette in front of the Chelsea Hotel, New York, 2000. Photo: Rita Barros

I’ll Be Your Mirror: Allen Midgette

Raymond Foye speaks with the actor who impersonated Andy Warhol during the great Warhol lecture hoax in the late 1960s. The two also discuss Midgette’s earlier film career in Italy and the difficulty of performing in a Warhol film.

Graham Nash at home, San Francisco, 1972. An M. C. Escher print from his collection can be seen on the floor to the right. Photo: Joel Bernstein

Graham Nash

Raymond Foye offers a window into his long-standing friendship with Graham Nash, guiding us through the legendary musician’s evolving interest in art and the visual world.

A black-and-white photograph of the poet Bob Kaufman leaning against a counter wearing a floral jacket, striped pants, and sunglasses.

Rain Unraveled Tales

In November 2019, City Lights Publishers released Collected Poems of Bob Kaufman, the first comprehensive collection of the poet’s work. Here Raymond Foye, the book’s coeditor, reminisces about his long friendship with Kaufman and reflects on the enduring power of the poems.

Helen Frankenthaler, Heart of London Map, steel sculpture

Helen Frankenthaler: A Painter’s Sculptures

On the occasion of four exhibitions in London exploring different aspects of Helen Frankenthaler’s work, Lauren Mahony introduces texts by the sculptor Anthony Caro and by the artist herself on her relatively unfamiliar first body of sculpture, made in the summer of 1972 in Caro’s London studio.

Carrie Mae Weems’s The Louvre (2006), on the cover of Gagosian Quarterly, Summer 2021

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Summer 2021

The Summer 2021 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring Carrie Mae Weems’s The Louvre (2006) on its cover.

Black-and-white photograph of Marie-Laure de Noailles in 1936 by Man Ray.

Game Changer
Vicomtesse Marie-Laure de Noailles

Ariella Wolens explores the patron’s role in fostering the legendary art world of early twentieth-century France.

Installation view, Adriana Varejão: Talavera, Gagosian, West 21st Street, New York, May 3–June 26, 2021. Photo: Rob McKeever

Adriana Varejão: For a Poetics of Difference

Curator Luisa Duarte considers the artist’s oeuvre, writing on Varejão’s active engagement with theories of difference, as well as the cultural specters of the past.

Dr. David Driskell, 2002, head resting on hand in a blue shirt with art in the background.

Game Changer
Dr. David Driskell

Taylor Aldridge reflects on the enduring legacy of the artist, educator, curator, and scholar.

Albert Oehlen’s studio, Ispaster, Spain, 2019–20. Photos © Esther Freund

Albert Oehlen: Terrifying Sunset

The artist speaks with Mark Godfrey about his new paintings, touching on the works’ relationship to John Graham, the Rothko Chapel, and Leigh Bowery.

Eiko Otake stands on what was part of the original seawall next to the Tomioka Fishing Harbor.

A Body in Fukushima

Ten years after Fukushima’s nuclear meltdown of 2011, movement-based artist Eiko Otake and historian/photographer William Johnston discuss their visits to that irradiated landscape. The forthcoming book A Body in Fukushima documents their ongoing performance project.