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Henry Moore

Henry Moore, Three Way Ring, 1966 Porcelain, 9 11/16 × 13 ⅜ × 11 ⅜ inches (24.6 × 34 × 29 cm), edition of 6Reproduced by permission of The Henry Moore Foundation, photo by Mike Bruce

Henry Moore, Three Way Ring, 1966

Porcelain, 9 11/16 × 13 ⅜ × 11 ⅜ inches (24.6 × 34 × 29 cm), edition of 6
Reproduced by permission of The Henry Moore Foundation, photo by Mike Bruce

Henry Moore, Large Two Forms, 1966 Bronze, 141 11/16 × 240 3/16 × 171 5/16 inches (360 × 610 × 435 cm), edition of 4Reproduced by permission of The Henry Moore Foundation

Henry Moore, Large Two Forms, 1966

Bronze, 141 11/16 × 240 3/16 × 171 5/16 inches (360 × 610 × 435 cm), edition of 4
Reproduced by permission of The Henry Moore Foundation

Henry Moore, Family Group, 1945 Bronze, 11 × 5 × 8 inches (27.9 × 12.7 × 20.3 cm)

Henry Moore, Family Group, 1945

Bronze, 11 × 5 × 8 inches (27.9 × 12.7 × 20.3 cm)

About

A giant of modern sculpture, Henry Moore engaged the abstract, the surreal, the primitive, and the classical in vigorous corporeal forms that are as accessible and familiar as they are avant-garde. His large-scale works celebrated the power of organic imagery at a time when traditional representation was largely eschewed by the vanguard art establishment. Their overwhelming physicality and forceful presence promotes a charged relation between sculpture, site, and viewer.

Moore was born in 1898 in Castleford, England, and died in 1986 in Much Hadham, England. After teaching at Castleford Grammar School, England, Moore began studying at the Leeds School of Art in 1919. From 1921 to 1924 he studied at the Royal Academy of Art, London, with traveling scholarships to Paris (1923) and Italy (1925). He then taught at the Royal Academy of Art from 1924 to 1932, and from 1932 to 1939 at the Chelsea School of Art, London. Recent solo exhibitions include the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC (2001); Henry Moore: Uma Retrospetiva, Pinacoteca do Estado de São Paulo (2005, traveled to Paço Imperial, Rio de Janeiro; and Centro Cultural Banco do Brasil, Brasília); Moore and Mexico, Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Monterrey, Mexico (2005); Imaginary Landscapes, Frederik Meijer Gardens and Sculpture Park, Grand Rapids, Michigan (2005); War and Utility, Imperial War Museum, London (2007); Natural Form, Tate Liverpool, England (2007); Moore and Mythology, Musée Bourdelle, Paris (2008); Mother and Child: Henry Moore’s West Dean Tapestries, Figge Art Museum, Davenport, Iowa (2008); Moore in America, New York Botanical Garden, New York (2008); Henry Moore and the Challenge of Architecture, Didrichsen Art Museum, Helsinki (2008); Henry Moore Sheep, Saffron Walden Museum, England (2009); Musée Rodin, Paris (2010); Tate Britain, London (2010); Blitz and Blockade: Henry Moore at the Hermitage, State Hermitage Museum, Saint Petersburg, Russia (2011); Prints and Portfolios, Henry Moore Institute, Leeds, England (2011); Henry Moore and the Classic Canon of Modern Sculpture, Kremlin Museums, Moscow (2012); Outside, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam (2013); and Back to a Land, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Wakefield, England (2015).

Museum Exhibitions

Installation view, Henry Moore: Il Disegno dello scultore, Museo Novecento, Florence, Italy, January 18–July 18, 2021. Artwork: Reproduced by permission of the Henry Moore Foundation. Photo: Serge Domingie

On View

Henry Moore
Il Disegno dello scultore

Through July 18, 2021
Museo Novecento, Florence, Italy
www.museonovecento.it

Presented in collaboration with the Henry Moore Foundation, this exhibition, whose title translates to The Sculptor’s Drawing, explores the relationship between drawing and sculpture in Henry Moore’s work and includes more than seventy drawings as well as graphics and sculptures. Through the analysis of recurring iconographic themes such as natural forms (rocks, pebbles, roots, and trunks), animals, skulls, and the artist’s hands, the exhibition seeks to deepen the conceptual and formal genesis of Moore’s work.

Installation view, Henry Moore: Il Disegno dello scultore, Museo Novecento, Florence, Italy, January 18–July 18, 2021. Artwork: Reproduced by permission of the Henry Moore Foundation. Photo: Serge Domingie

Henry Moore holding the plaster maquette for his sculpture Reclining Figure: Hand (1976). Photo: Henry Moore Archive

Opening Soon

This Living Hand
Edmund de Waal Presents Henry Moore

May 17–October 31, 2021
Henry Moore Studios & Gardens, Perry Green, England
www.henry-moore.org

Curated by Edmund de Waal, this exhibition explores the role of touch and the iconography of the hand in Henry Moore’s art. Moore believed that “tactile experience is very important as an aesthetic dimension in sculpture.” Original sculptures by de Waal, as well as a group of Moore’s drawings and sculptural works charting his interest in the hand as a subject, are included.

Henry Moore holding the plaster maquette for his sculpture Reclining Figure: Hand (1976). Photo: Henry Moore Archive

Installation view, Untitled, 2020, Punta della Dogana, Venice, March 22–December 13, 2020. Artwork © Thomas Houseago. Photo: Marco Cappelletti/DSL Studio

Closed

Untitled, 2020

March 22–November 4, 2020
Punta della Dogana, Venice
www.palazzograssi.it

Conceived and curated by Thomas Houseago, Muna El Fituri, and Caroline Bourgeois, Untitled, 2020 places into dialogue works in a broad range of media by more than sixty artists held by the Pinault Collection, international museums, and private collections. The exhibition centers around a re-creation of Houseago’s studio in Tadao Ando’s cube room, in the heart of Punta della Dogana. Work by Ellen Gallagher, Duane Hanson, Mike Kelley, Henry Moore, and Nam June Paik is included.

Installation view, Untitled, 2020, Punta della Dogana, Venice, March 22–December 13, 2020. Artwork © Thomas Houseago. Photo: Marco Cappelletti/DSL Studio

Installation view, Bill Brandt / Henry Moore, Hepworth Wakefield, England, May 31–November 1, 2020. Artwork, left to right: Reproduced by permission of The Henry Moore Foundation, © Bill Brandt/Bill Brandt Archive Ltd. Photo: George Baggaley

Closed

Bill Brandt / Henry Moore

May 31–November 1, 2020
Hepworth Wakefield, England
hepworthwakefield.org

This exhibition explores the parallel and intersecting paths of the photographer Bill Brandt and sculptor Henry Moore, who first met during the Second World War, when they both created images of civilians sheltering from the Blitz in the London Underground. The show brings together more than two hundred works, including Moore’s celebrated Reclining Figure sculptures and Brandt’s well-known photographs of coal miners and their families in Durham and Yorkshire. Also on view are rare original color transparencies by Brandt, and Moore’s little-known photocollages.

Installation view, Bill Brandt / Henry Moore, Hepworth Wakefield, England, May 31–November 1, 2020. Artwork, left to right: Reproduced by permission of The Henry Moore Foundation, © Bill Brandt/Bill Brandt Archive Ltd. Photo: George Baggaley

See all Museum Exhibitions for Henry Moore