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Henry Moore

Henry Moore, Three Way Ring, 1966 Porcelain, 9 11/16 × 13 ⅜ × 11 ⅜ inches (24.6 × 34 × 29 cm), edition of 6Reproduced by permission of The Henry Moore Foundation, photo by Mike Bruce

Henry Moore, Three Way Ring, 1966

Porcelain, 9 11/16 × 13 ⅜ × 11 ⅜ inches (24.6 × 34 × 29 cm), edition of 6
Reproduced by permission of The Henry Moore Foundation, photo by Mike Bruce

Henry Moore, Large Two Forms, 1966 Bronze, 141 11/16 × 240 3/16 × 171 5/16 inches (360 × 610 × 435 cm), edition of 4Reproduced by permission of The Henry Moore Foundation

Henry Moore, Large Two Forms, 1966

Bronze, 141 11/16 × 240 3/16 × 171 5/16 inches (360 × 610 × 435 cm), edition of 4
Reproduced by permission of The Henry Moore Foundation

Henry Moore, Family Group, 1945 Bronze, 11 × 5 × 8 inches (27.9 × 12.7 × 20.3 cm)

Henry Moore, Family Group, 1945

Bronze, 11 × 5 × 8 inches (27.9 × 12.7 × 20.3 cm)

About

A giant of modern sculpture, Henry Moore engaged the abstract, the surreal, the primitive, and the classical in vigorous corporeal forms that are as accessible and familiar as they are avant-garde. His large-scale works celebrated the power of organic imagery at a time when traditional representation was largely eschewed by the vanguard art establishment. Their overwhelming physicality and forceful presence promotes a charged relation between sculpture, site, and viewer.

Moore was born in 1898 in Castleford, England, and died in 1986 in Much Hadham, England. After teaching at Castleford Grammar School, England, Moore began studying at the Leeds School of Art in 1919. From 1921 to 1924 he studied at the Royal Academy of Art, London, with traveling scholarships to Paris (1923) and Italy (1925). He then taught at the Royal Academy of Art from 1924 to 1932, and from 1932 to 1939 at the Chelsea School of Art, London. Recent solo exhibitions include the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC (2001); Henry Moore: Uma Retrospetiva, Pinacoteca do Estado de São Paulo (2005, traveled to Paço Imperial, Rio de Janeiro; and Centro Cultural Banco do Brasil, Brasília); Moore and Mexico, Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Monterrey, Mexico (2005); Imaginary Landscapes, Frederik Meijer Gardens and Sculpture Park, Grand Rapids, Michigan (2005); War and Utility, Imperial War Museum, London (2007); Natural Form, Tate Liverpool, England (2007); Moore and Mythology, Musée Bourdelle, Paris (2008); Mother and Child: Henry Moore’s West Dean Tapestries, Figge Art Museum, Davenport, Iowa (2008); Moore in America, New York Botanical Garden, New York (2008); Henry Moore and the Challenge of Architecture, Didrichsen Art Museum, Helsinki (2008); Henry Moore Sheep, Saffron Walden Museum, England (2009); Musée Rodin, Paris (2010); Tate Britain, London (2010); Blitz and Blockade: Henry Moore at the Hermitage, State Hermitage Museum, Saint Petersburg, Russia (2011); Prints and Portfolios, Henry Moore Institute, Leeds, England (2011); Henry Moore and the Classic Canon of Modern Sculpture, Kremlin Museums, Moscow (2012); Outside, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam (2013); and Back to a Land, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Wakefield, England (2015).

From the Quarterly

Museum Exhibitions

Rachel Whiteread, Untitled, 1993 © Rachel Whiteread

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The Sculptor’s Drawings

April 20–July 12, 2018
Museo Novecento, Florence, Italy
www.museonovecento.it

Drawing, as the initial and essential visual definition of an idea, has since antiquity played a fundamental role in the field of artistic creation. The Sculptor’s Drawings will highlight the connection between the graphic medium and the realization of sculpture and installation art. Work by Henry Moore and Rachel Whiteread will be included.

Rachel Whiteread, Untitled, 1993 © Rachel Whiteread

Roy Lichtenstein, Temple, 1964 © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

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The Classical Now

March 2–April 28, 2018
King’s College, London
www.kcl.ac.uk

The Classical Now pairs the work of modern and contemporary artists with classical Greek and Roman antiquities. The exhibition traces the ways in which Greco-Roman art has captured and permeated modern imagination, while exploring the myriad continuities and contrasts between the ancient, modern, and contemporary, revealing the “classical” as a living and fluid tradition. Work by Michael Craig-Martin, Damien Hirst, Alex Israel, Yves Klein, Roy Lichtenstein, Henry Moore, Bruce Nauman, Pablo Picasso, and Rachel Whiteread is included.

Roy Lichtenstein, Temple, 1964 © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Henry Moore, Reclining Figure, 1929, Leeds Museums & Galleries © The Henry Moore Foundation 2017

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Becoming Henry Moore

April 14–October 22, 2017
Henry Moore Studios & Gardens, Perry Green, UK
www.henry-moore.org

Discover how Henry Moore developed from a promising schoolboy into Britain’s foremost modern sculptor. Featuring works by Picasso, Rembrandt, Michelangelo, and Modigliani, Becoming Henry Moore is a rare opportunity to see Henry Moore’s early works alongside that of the artists who inspired him.

Henry Moore, Reclining Figure, 1929, Leeds Museums & Galleries © The Henry Moore Foundation 2017