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Henry Moore

Henry Moore, Three Way Ring, 1966 Porcelain, 9 11/16 × 13 ⅜ × 11 ⅜ inches (24.6 × 34 × 29 cm), edition of 6Reproduced by permission of The Henry Moore Foundation, photo by Mike Bruce

Henry Moore, Three Way Ring, 1966

Porcelain, 9 11/16 × 13 ⅜ × 11 ⅜ inches (24.6 × 34 × 29 cm), edition of 6
Reproduced by permission of The Henry Moore Foundation, photo by Mike Bruce

Henry Moore, Large Two Forms, 1966 Bronze, 141 11/16 × 240 3/16 × 171 5/16 inches (360 × 610 × 435 cm), edition of 4Reproduced by permission of The Henry Moore Foundation

Henry Moore, Large Two Forms, 1966

Bronze, 141 11/16 × 240 3/16 × 171 5/16 inches (360 × 610 × 435 cm), edition of 4
Reproduced by permission of The Henry Moore Foundation

Henry Moore, Family Group, 1945 Bronze, 11 × 5 × 8 inches (27.9 × 12.7 × 20.3 cm)

Henry Moore, Family Group, 1945

Bronze, 11 × 5 × 8 inches (27.9 × 12.7 × 20.3 cm)

About

A giant of modern sculpture, Henry Moore engaged the abstract, the surreal, the primitive, and the classical in vigorous corporeal forms that are as accessible and familiar as they are avant-garde. His large-scale works celebrated the power of organic imagery at a time when traditional representation was largely eschewed by the vanguard art establishment. Their overwhelming physicality and forceful presence promotes a charged relation between sculpture, site, and viewer.

Moore was born in 1898 in Castleford, England, and died in 1986 in Much Hadham, England. After teaching at Castleford Grammar School, England, Moore began studying at the Leeds School of Art in 1919. From 1921 to 1924 he studied at the Royal Academy of Art, London, with traveling scholarships to Paris (1923) and Italy (1925). He then taught at the Royal Academy of Art from 1924 to 1932, and from 1932 to 1939 at the Chelsea School of Art, London. Recent solo exhibitions include the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC (2001); Henry Moore: Uma Retrospetiva, Pinacoteca do Estado de São Paulo (2005, traveled to Paço Imperial, Rio de Janeiro; and Centro Cultural Banco do Brasil, Brasília); Moore and Mexico, Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Monterrey, Mexico (2005); Imaginary Landscapes, Frederik Meijer Gardens and Sculpture Park, Grand Rapids, Michigan (2005); War and Utility, Imperial War Museum, London (2007); Natural Form, Tate Liverpool, England (2007); Moore and Mythology, Musée Bourdelle, Paris (2008); Mother and Child: Henry Moore’s West Dean Tapestries, Figge Art Museum, Davenport, Iowa (2008); Moore in America, New York Botanical Garden, New York (2008); Henry Moore and the Challenge of Architecture, Didrichsen Art Museum, Helsinki (2008); Henry Moore Sheep, Saffron Walden Museum, England (2009); Musée Rodin, Paris (2010); Tate Britain, London (2010); Blitz and Blockade: Henry Moore at the Hermitage, State Hermitage Museum, Saint Petersburg, Russia (2011); Prints and Portfolios, Henry Moore Institute, Leeds, England (2011); Henry Moore and the Classic Canon of Modern Sculpture, Kremlin Museums, Moscow (2012); Outside, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam (2013); and Back to a Land, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Wakefield, England (2015).

Museum Exhibitions

Henry Moore, Seated Figure, 1948 © Henry Moore Foundation

Closing this Week

Henry Moore Drawings
The Art of Seeing

Through October 27, 2019
Henry Moore Foundation, Perry Green, England
www.henry-moore.org

Although Henry Moore is best known as a sculptor, he was an exceptionally talented and prolific draftsman, producing a body of nearly 7,500 drawings over seven decades. The Art of Seeing explores the many different ways in which Moore used drawing, starting with studies from life of the 1920s and ending with the rarely seen, but surprisingly fine, late drawings of the 1970s and early 1980s. The exhibition includes different types of drawings, from preparatory studies and ideas for sculpture and prints, to studies and copies of works by artists Moore admired, to studies of the human figure, animals, the landscape and the weather, portraits, and more.

Henry Moore, Seated Figure, 1948 © Henry Moore Foundation

Henry Moore, Three Piece Sculpture: Vertebrae, 1968–69, installation view, Houghton Hall, Norfolk, England, May 1–September 29, 2019 © Henry Moore Foundation. Photo: Pete Huggins

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Henry Moore at Houghton Hall
Nature and Inspiration

May 1–September 29, 2019
Houghton Hall, Norfolk, England
www.houghtonhall.com

This exhibition of works by Henry Moore includes several monumental outdoor pieces on the grounds of the house, as well as a selection of smaller works, models, and etchings, which are shown in the ground-floor gallery spaces.

Henry Moore, Three Piece Sculpture: Vertebrae, 1968–69, installation view, Houghton Hall, Norfolk, England, May 1–September 29, 2019 © Henry Moore Foundation. Photo: Pete Huggins

Henry Moore, Working Model for Seated Figure: Arms Outstretched, 1960 © Henry Moore Foundation

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The Power of Nature
Henry Moore in Poland

February 22–June 30, 2019
National Museum in Kraków, Poland
mnk.pl

The Power of Nature: Henry Moore in Poland features more than twenty sculptures, showcasing a cross section of Henry Moore’s most iconic themes on a variety of scales—from small works and maquettes to monumental bronzes. The exhibition also explores Moore’s influence on Polish art, especially in the immediate aftermath of his seminal 1959 exhibition in Poland. The exhibition originated at the Centre of Polish Sculpture in Orońsko, Poland.

Henry Moore, Working Model for Seated Figure: Arms Outstretched, 1960 © Henry Moore Foundation

Henry Moore with Helmet Head No. 2 (1955) in his studio, Perry Green, England, 1967. Artwork © Henry Moore Foundation. Photo: John Hedgecoe, 1967

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Henry Moore
The Helmet Heads

March 6–June 23, 2019
Wallace Collection, London
www.wallacecollection.org

This exhibition is one of the first to explore Henry Moore’s fascination with armor. The artist’s Helmet Head sculptures, which are here shown together for the first time, are presented in collaboration with the Henry Moore Foundation. The show comprises more than sixty sketches, drawings, maquettes, and full-size sculptures in plaster, lead, and bronze, juxtaposed with the Renaissance armor that inspired them.

Henry Moore with Helmet Head No. 2 (1955) in his studio, Perry Green, England, 1967. Artwork © Henry Moore Foundation. Photo: John Hedgecoe, 1967

See all Museum Exhibitions for Henry Moore