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Jeff Koons

Cracked Egg (Blue)

October 2–December 22, 2006
Davies Street, London

Jeff Koons: Cracked Egg (Blue) Installation view

Jeff Koons: Cracked Egg (Blue)

Installation view

Jeff Koons: Cracked Egg (Blue) Installation view

Jeff Koons: Cracked Egg (Blue)

Installation view

Works Exhibited

Jeff Koons, Cracked Egg (Blue), 1994–2006 Mirror-polished stainless steel with transparent color coating, in 2 parts, 78 × 62 × 62 inches (198.1 × 157.5 × 157.5 cm) and 18 × 48 × 48 inches (45.7 × 121.9 × 121.9 cm), 1 of 5 unique versions© Jeff Koons

Jeff Koons, Cracked Egg (Blue), 1994–2006

Mirror-polished stainless steel with transparent color coating, in 2 parts, 78 × 62 × 62 inches (198.1 × 157.5 × 157.5 cm) and 18 × 48 × 48 inches (45.7 × 121.9 × 121.9 cm), 1 of 5 unique versions
© Jeff Koons

About

When I was about five years old, I would go after school to this little building, like a little shelter. In the afternoons we’d make things out of Popsicle sticks. We’d work with Play-Doh. And this experience gave me my foundation. That’s what I hold on to in the world. And whatever I made at that time, I know is equivalent to what I’m doing now. And that was, for me, really art.
—Jeff Koons

Gagosian is pleased to present the exhibition of Cracked Egg (Blue) (1994–2006) by Jeff Koons, a large two-part stainless-steel sculpture from the mythic Celebration series that he began with Balloon Dog in 1994. Cracked Egg (Blue) is a unique work and the first of five versions (including the artist’s proof), each rendered in a different vivid color.

The Celebration series comprises twenty different sculptures and sixteen paintings inspired by Koons’s enduring preoccupation with childhood experiences and childlike consciousness. These paintings and sculptures isolate moments and objects associated with life’s celebratory events such as birthdays and holidays. With its impressive scale, pure lines, and flawless, highly reflective surface, Cracked Egg (Blue) resonates with iconic significance.

From the outset of his controversial career, Koons turned the traditional notion of the work of art and its context inside out. Focusing on some of the most unexpected objects as models for his work, from vacuum cleaners and inflatable flowers to novelty drink caddies, Koons eschewed typical standards of “good taste” in art, instead embracing conventional, distinctly American middle-class values to expose the vulnerabilities of hierarchies and value systems. Addressing various conceptual constructs including the new, the banal, and the heavenly, Koons has evolved his work from its literal, deadpan beginnings to baroque manifestations that oscillate between abstraction, sculpture, and pure spectacle.

From the Quarterly

Jeff Koons: Easyfun-Ethereal

Jeff Koons: Easyfun-Ethereal

Learn more about Jeff Koons’s Easyfun-Ethereal series in this video featuring Rebecca Sternthal, one of the organizers behind the most recent exhibition of these works in New York.

Rx Art

The Bigger Picture
Rx Art

Derek Blasberg speaks with Diane Brown, president and founder of RxArt, and with contributing artists Dan Colen, Urs Fischer, and Jeff Koons about the transformative power of visual art.

Jeff Koons

The Bigger Picture
Jeff Koons

Jeff Koons speaks with Alison McDonald and Maura Harty about his longstanding commitment to protecting the rights of children.

Jeff Koons Glenn Fuhrman

In Conversation
Jeff Koons Glenn Fuhrman

The FLAG Art Foundation hosted a conversation between Jeff Koons and FLAG founder Glenn Fuhrman, in which the two discuss the dichotomy between sexuality and childhood innocence in Koons’s oeuvre, remaking Made in Heaven with Lady Gaga, what drives Koons to make more work, and several works including Cat on a Clothesline (1994–2001) and Winter Bears (1988).

The Last 36 Hours

The Last 36 Hours

Derek Blasberg speaks with Scott Rothkopf, a curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art, about the last thirty-six hours of the Jeff Koons retrospective, which also marked the end of the museum’s tenure in uptown Manhattan.

Split-Rocker: A Landscaping Perspective

Split-Rocker: A Landscaping Perspective

Jeff Koons’s flowering sculpture Split-Rocker, at once imposing and adorable, has cast a spell on New York City’s Rockefeller Center. Derek Blasberg interviews Matt Donham, Koons’s landscape designer on the project, to find out more.